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12 bore or 20 bore?
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Bebo



Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 12535
Location: East Sussex
PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 12 7:32 pm    Post subject: 12 bore or 20 bore?  Reply with quote    

Planning on taking up clay pigeon shooting, just applied for my shotgun certificate and I'm looking at guns. Having ended up with a bruised shoulder last time I used a 12 bore for around 40 shots, I was thinking that maybe I'd be better off with a 20 bore. Anyone got one or used one? Any opinions on whether its a good idea or not?

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 3953
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 12 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I`ve had a 20 bore for many years,initally i bought it for my Son to use under my supervision,but as he got older,and now leads his own life,i use it when necessary.

Its only a single barrel Baikal,cheap and cheerful,but a nice light easily handled gun with nice balance,and plenty of power to drop a pig or a cow.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 12 8:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Did the 12 bore you used fit correctly, if it's too big or small it can cause more bruising. Do you have any clay grounds locally where you could try one of each?

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8399
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 12 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Never used a 20 bore always a 12, & never had a problem with bruising.
Never had a gun fitted.
I first started with my Dads old hammer side by side at 15 & bought a cheap over & under when I started work.
If you suffered bruising IMHO you where probably holding the gun wrong & stance to rigid.
Shooting clays with a 20 bore will need a lot more accuracy, as there's less lead in each load, so you will be at a disadvantage against other guns unless you're a crack shot.
I would try again but next time with a bit of instruction from a more experienced shot.

12Bore



Joined: 15 Jun 2008
Posts: 9087
Location: Paddling in the Mersey
PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 12 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    


vegplot



Joined: 19 Apr 2007
Posts: 21297
Location: Ynys Môn
PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 12 8:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There's not an awful lot of difference in felt recoil between the two. 20 bores tend to be lighter and while they have a smaller cartridge the reduced gun weight makes it feel about the same as a 12 bore when fired - in general.

Poor gun fit is probably the reason you're getting a bruised shoulder, more so than the calibre of the gun.

Bebo



Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 12535
Location: East Sussex
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 12 4:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Tavascarow wrote:
I would try again but next time with a bit of instruction from a more experienced shot.


It was at a lesson with a basc registered instructor where I got the bruise. I intend to pay for a gun fitting session before I buy anything as I don't really want to fork out around a grand for something that isn't right.

Good point about greater accuracy being needed, I'm far from a crack shot so a 12 bore is probably a better bet.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13477

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 12 5:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The majority of cartridges made and used in the UK are 12 bore, which sees them being far cheaper to purchase than 20 bore cartridges. Its well worth you pricing them up before you decide which way to go.

Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8399
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 12 5:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bebo wrote:
Tavascarow wrote:
I would try again but next time with a bit of instruction from a more experienced shot.


It was at a lesson with a basc registered instructor where I got the bruise. I intend to pay for a gun fitting session before I buy anything as I don't really want to fork out around a grand for something that isn't right.

Good point about greater accuracy being needed, I'm far from a crack shot so a 12 bore is probably a better bet.

Despite that you where probably tensed up because you didn't know what to expect.
If the butt is tight to your shoulder & your body relaxed the recoil will pass through you, not into you.
A fitted gun will make you a better shot but one that doesn't fit, unless it's ridiculously out, shouldn't bruise your shoulder.

Colin & Jan



Joined: 03 Mar 2006
Posts: 203
Location: Dover, Kent
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 12 7:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I use both a twelve and a twenty bore. Not a lot of difference in recoil, dependant on the cartridge. So many people put bigger cartridges through both calibres it's no wonder there are bruised shoulders.

If I was going to be shooting predominantly clays and not having to lug the gun around all day then a properly fitted over and under twelve bore with 24 or 28 gram cartridges would be the way to go.

I'm a side-by-side user but they have a tendancy to rise (think its called muzzle flip) on the first shot (especially with heavy cartridges) and novices can sometimes struggle to get a line on the bird with the second shot.

Bebo



Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 12535
Location: East Sussex
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 12 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Cheers for that. I was planning on an over and under. I used a Beretta Silver Pigeon for the lesson I had and I gather that they are considered a pretty good beginners gun. I'll get measured up for one and then see if I can pick one up second hand.

Gervase



Joined: 17 Nov 2004
Posts: 8655

PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 12 6:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

M-J has a Beretta 600 (very similar to the Silver pigeon) in 20-bore and it's a superb gun - very easy to shoot with and, to me, preferable to a 12-bore for most shooting.

kirstyfern



Joined: 03 Jan 2010
Posts: 1574
Location: Great Dunmow, Essex
PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 12 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Bebo wrote:
Cheers for that. I was planning on an over and under. I used a Beretta Silver Pigeon for the lesson I had and I gather that they are considered a pretty good beginners gun. I'll get measured up for one and then see if I can pick one up second hand.


That's what I have, 12 bore. Lovely gun, but I got a skeet stock fitted as it is a bit heavier and therefore you get less recoil.

I find the lighter guns actually 'lift' more when you shoot them and this can cause bruising.
I shoot 21 or 24 gram cartridges.
I also have a 'shoulder pad.
AND I still bruise

http://www.bushwear.co.uk/nostyles.php?ProductID=317237&ClassID=259'

smokingdragon



Joined: 22 Aug 2009
Posts: 68
Location: Nr. Neath S.Wales
PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 12 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Look at a gas semi auto - Berretta 301 etc far less recoil than a OU. For a general purpose auto that can do clays foxes or burglars get one that is adjustable and can take 3.5" cartidges. I've got a Baikal MP153 and its superbly practical.
Simon

Ty Gwyn



Joined: 22 Sep 2010
Posts: 3953
Location: Lampeter
PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 12 11:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gun`s must have moved on faster than me,

I thought a Magnum 3in was the longest cartridge available.

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