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Native Persimmons

 
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Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1700
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 14 10:58 pm    Post subject: Native Persimmons  Reply with quote    

Woo hoo! Look what I found on Sunday!



This is Diosporos virginiana, our native persimmon, also known as possum haw. The people whose yard had two huge trees were not interested. Just letting them fall on the ground and rot. The falling off the tree part is important, they must be very soft if they're to be edible rather than insanely astringent.

If only one, I'd have eaten it out of hand and enjoyed very much. But I got many more. *For some reason I cannot attach the image of a box of these little delicious native fruits. You'll have to take my word for it that I collected about 150.

Processed that evening and now have four 2-cup bags of pureed persimmon in the freezer.

Am thinking of persimmon cranberry pudding, or perhaps persimmon cranberry jam, or perhaps who knows what. After all, Thanksgiving is coming.

Any suggestions?

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34886
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 14 11:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

They look interesting. But no idea what you would do with them.

Bodrighy



Joined: 15 Aug 2008
Posts: 2157
Location: Near Devizes
PostPosted: Tue Nov 04, 14 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

They look a bit like our quinces.

Pete

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1700
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 14 1:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Quinces are very hard, inedible unless they are cooked. Could never eat a quince raw.

Do you not have the much larger Japanese persimmons, Diospiros kaki, in the stores?

Persimmons are - when fully ripe - very soft and pulpy. Wild trees are, of course, variable in quality. These were very pleasant to eat - brush off the dirt, squeeze /pinch to break the skin, and suck the sweet flesh from around the seeds.

If I had to choose something similar I might pick medlar.

In this Wikipedia article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diospyros_virginiana it mentions that the tree has been grown in England but the fruit rarely ripens.

Andrea



Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 2260
Location: Portugal
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 14 6:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Whether mine are the same variety I've no idea, but I rarely catch them at the right moment. Eaten too soon they turn your face inside out, and too late and they just rot. When I catch them slightly too soon or too late I include them with whatever other ingredients I have to make chutney, and if they're just right they never make it as far as the kitchen.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8726

PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 14 7:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

They sound rather more like our medlars. I think some people grow the Japanese ones as ornamentals, and may have seen them in the shops, but have never bought them.

Andrea



Joined: 02 May 2005
Posts: 2260
Location: Portugal
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 14 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We're lucky enough to be able to grow both here. Totally different beasts.

Piggyphile



Joined: 02 Apr 2009
Posts: 891
Location: Galicia
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 14 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

In the UK their grown up cousins are also called Sharon fruit. I love them when they are ripe. I have two trees of Diospiros kaki put in last winter and I await the first fruit with excitement. I hope to get hold of some Diosporos virginiana from Martin Crawford at the ART sometime soon.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43924
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Nov 05, 14 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We've got kaki and virginiana here. Most of the virginiana have died, 1 left. The kaki have got a crop on them this year, really lovely shrubby tree, looks great in fruit even before they change colour

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1700
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 14 4:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

And a brewery in Texas was making persimmon beer - http://www.fullsteam.ag/blog/2011/09/persimmon-foraging/

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8726

PostPosted: Thu Nov 06, 14 8:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I saw some persimmons for sale yesterday at the farm shop. Must have been imported I think. Not tempted to buy though.

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