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Nice Axe!

 
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sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41592
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 16 2:20 pm    Post subject: Nice Axe!  Reply with quote    

Robin Wood, who has posted here a bit in the past has axes for sale.
Linky Looks like a good bit of kit at a fair price to me.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32593
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 16 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

not tried one but the head is a very similar shape to my hand forged one which is an ace tool for all the jobs he mentions and prepping dinner if needs be.

those look very good value for quality

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 16 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I was tempted by one of those axes when they first came out. I ended up picking this little one up for about 50p, it needed a clean up but it's a similar weight and good for light work.


gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1323
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Tue Feb 23, 16 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I must admit to using a brumack for chopping firewood. I have various axes and small choppers, but none quite so balanced as the above. I paid a fiver once for a felling axe with a home made stale,40 years on still cuts the mustard!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8421

PostPosted: Wed Feb 24, 16 8:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

What do you call a brumack Gregotyn? I find using a small chopper easier for kindling, but use a bill hook for trimming hazel rods.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1323
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 16 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It is a hedge-laying tool. Blade about 1ft long, 5" wide, with straight cutting edges both sides and a curved end to a point on one side. I chop with the pointy bit upwards! I use it because it is so well balanced, heavier than a normal hand axe, but comfortable to use if you understand; we all get used to handling certain tools and this is one I will be lost without when it 'goes'. I have several but this is for kindling, I have others with one sharp blade, which I use for hedge-laying and trimming.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33569
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 16 4:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

This?

A billhook sort of thing?

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8421

PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 16 7:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There are many different types of billhooks with all sorts of variations. Mine is an ordinary one with a single blade and curved end, but not too curved. It has the advantage that the handle is smaller than usual, so I can hold it more easily. Mainly use it for threading out and cutting hazel rods to length, but can use it for splitting too.

Like most coppice workers, we have a small collection of billhooks of various shapes, all old Elwells, as we like that make.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1323
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 16 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

The very same, Nick. It just fits my hand and is well balanced to the point it feels light in weight. I have some others that are too heavy to use with single sharp edge, but deeper, thicker blade-much more meat in the blade, I guess you could chop your arm off with such a weapon. I have a few which need re-handling. So MR, you know what I call a brumack. Think they call billhooks our way the long handled ones that are used for cutting thicker branches-the sort that brushing hooks won't look at.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8421

PostPosted: Sat Feb 27, 16 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Different names in different places. We call the long handled ones slashers. They can be quite effective on clearing brush and brambles and have the advantage they keep your hands away from the thorns. Have only just got all the thorns out of my right hand from the last session on coppicing among the brambles.

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1323
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Sat Feb 27, 16 10:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

May I suggest-tongue in cheek- that you invest in a pair of softish leather gloves as an anti thorn protection?
You are right about the different types. I was very keen to buy a very small single sided bill hook/brumack, which looked so good then I asked why...... but it was a thing of beauty. I am at the point where less is better, but it is hard!

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8421

PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 16 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I wear a glove on my left hand, but not the one holding the bill hook. Something that is drummed into all coppice workers as it is so easy for a tool handle to slip on wet leather.

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