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Uses for willow wood?
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Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 3419
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 08 10:31 pm    Post subject: Uses for willow wood? Reply with quote    

My mother has a tall (maybe 40+ feet?) weeping willow in front of her house that she wants taken out. Does anyone know of anything worthwhile to do with the wood? It's got a good (ok, it's not great, but there aren't that many knots...), fairly straight section of trunk about 18' tall with at least a 12" diameter. I know it's not of much worth as timber or firewood as it's so light and weak. Is it good for anything? Maybe boxes if I got my friend to mill it? (hoping someone will fill me in, before I embarrass myself even bringing it up to him... )

Gill



Joined: 18 Jul 2006
Posts: 244

PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 08 10:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

In England, willow would be the choice wood for cricket bats. Not so sure if there would be much demand for them where you are, though...

Gill

RichardW



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 8138
Location: Llyn Peninsular North Wales
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 08 10:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Dont think a 12" tree will log into much. By the time you have trimed off the bark / 4 sides to square it up you will have 8" x 8" max, so 8 x 1 inch planks by the length its straight / parrallel for. Is willow any good for turning? i have been felling a few (normal not weaping willow) of about that size from an old copice system but have fire wooded it all.

Justme

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 3419
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 08 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Is it worth your while for firewood? Seems like it's low on the BTUs? I suppose that's ok for spring and fall burning though...

Lorrainelovesplants



Joined: 13 Oct 2006
Posts: 5718
Location: Cornwall
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 08 5:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Id log it for firewood. I dont think its the kind of wood that can be used for much, but most willows are ok to burn. We grow Bowles hybrid as a croppable windbreak. You stagger the planting and coppice it every 4 yrs. It burns ok. We also helped our neighbour fell 15 Leylandii, and they burn great (even the day after felling).
Firewood is a premium here - skips are emptied, and you never see waste wood.

snozzer



Joined: 19 Oct 2006
Posts: 296
Location: The Centre of Britian
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 08 7:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Willow is a nightmare on an open fire as it spits like crazy. Good in a stove though.

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 08 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Willow makes an excellent substrate for chicken of the woods mushroom, Laetiporus sulphureus. I'd have thought that you'd be able to find a supplier of plugs to inoculate the stump/trunk with over there.

Northern_Lad



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 14210
Location: Somewhere
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 08 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Gill wrote:
In England, willow would be the choice wood for cricket bats. Not so sure if there would be much demand for them where you are, though...

Gill


It is, but that's only one specific breed of willow; can't remember which one though.

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24291
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 08 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Northern_Lad wrote:
Gill wrote:
In England, willow would be the choice wood for cricket bats. Not so sure if there would be much demand for them where you are, though...

Gill


It is, but that's only one specific breed of willow; can't remember which one though.


It's the Cricket Bat Willow. Quick edit: that's Salix alba caerulea.

We hate willow for burning: spitty and short-lived.

Do be aware that, if the tree's near the house taking it out will affect water in the soil. Willows suck it up and when they're removed there can be a lot of water in the soil that isn't being used. Can cause problems with house foundations.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 3419
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 08 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hmm... using for a mushroom substrate may be the best choice, as firewood is certainly not at a premium here (the state is 80% wooded).

Hadn't even thought about considering the hydrological implications... It's a very wet spot... then again, that's the only spot that has sandy soil with somewhat good drainage...

mochyn



Joined: 21 Dec 2004
Posts: 24291
Location: mid-Wales
PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 08 2:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

cpg03 wrote:
Hadn't even thought about considering the hydrological implications... It's a very wet spot... then again, that's the only spot that has sandy soil with somewhat good drainage...


My main concern would be how close it is to the house, and whether up- or down-slope.

Whatever, think before you cut! And it will probably re-grow from the stump anyway, unless you destroy that too.

Mrs Fiddlesticks



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 10460

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 08 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mochyn wrote:

Do be aware that, if the tree's near the house taking it out will affect water in the soil. Willows suck it up and when they're removed there can be a lot of water in the soil that isn't being used. Can cause problems with house foundations.


that's handy to know. We've a weeping willow in our front garden - older than the house - and I have occasionally mused on removing it. As it is we keep it pollarded just in case as our surveyor advised when we bought the property.

cab



Joined: 01 Nov 2004
Posts: 32429

PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 08 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

cpg03 wrote:
Hmm... using for a mushroom substrate may be the best choice, as firewood is certainly not at a premium here (the state is 80% wooded).


Then similarly you ought to have no end of mushrooms growing wild already

Still, something like chicken of the woods would be an ideal candidate for you to grow on there, because it looks amazing, its tasty, and its simply more convenient having it growing nearby than out in the woods.

Rivermom



Joined: 10 Jun 2008
Posts: 9
Location: Ireland; north-west
PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 08 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Willow is a very useful wood for craft workers. My kids cut it into logs, and then split little planks off the logs, and then carve spoons and forks and things for their camping trips. I have made cups and trugs and some terrible carvings with the stuff.

Rivermom



Joined: 10 Jun 2008
Posts: 9
Location: Ireland; north-west
PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 08 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

cab wrote:
Willow makes an excellent substrate for chicken of the woods mushroom, Laetiporus sulphureus. I'd have thought that you'd be able to find a supplier of plugs to inoculate the stump/trunk with over there.


what is this about growing mushrooms on tree stumps? sounds fascinating. Tell me more.

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