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Ash dieback identification
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Tavascarow



Joined: 06 Aug 2006
Posts: 8404
Location: South Cornwall
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 4:17 pm    Post subject: Ash dieback identification  Reply with quote    

A good site for identifying this horrible disease.
Forestry Commission pest alert.

Midland Spinner



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 2931
Location: Under a green roof
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Useful linky, thanks for posting it.

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34886
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It is. I haven't heard of any cases over this side of the country yet. Have you?

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

And, IMHO, slightly daft advice from the government.

The environment secretary has urged the public to wash their dogs and boots and even their children after visiting wooded areas, to help stop the spread of a fungus which is killing ash trees.

I think it might be wise if you're traveling a fair distance but I can't see many people bothering.

Being pragmatic I'm going to assume the disease will be here in a year or two and start coppicing some of my ash trees, encourage even more diversity and get the seed bed sorted this winter ready for the collection of local seed.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32882
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

coppice sounds good

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33659
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

At four this morning, something on radio 4 was talking about this. The FC were offering the same advice, but as a token, admitting the disease was coming, and there's nothing they can do. We have resistant ash strains, it they'll only be widespread in a generation. Might do swathes of damage, but perhaps it's just nature rolling through the world, and will simply be another stage in the ever changing landscape. One day we might learn not to rely on a narrow genetic range, but I doubt it.

Midland Spinner



Joined: 13 Jan 2009
Posts: 2931
Location: Under a green roof
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 5:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:
Being pragmatic I'm going to assume the disease will be here in a year or two and start coppicing some of my ash trees, encourage even more diversity and get the seed bed sorted this winter ready for the collection of local seed.


I wondered whether coppicing would be a bit of a risk in case the fungus enters via the cut surfaces - have you seen any advice one way or the other (apart from the above daft stuff?)

Personally I'm all for encouraging trees to seed & breed up resistance - I do wonder whether we'd have beaten back Dutch Elm if the trees had been allowed to sprout from suckers, rather than being grubbed out wholesale in the 1970s

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34886
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We still have plenty of elms here, but they never get very big. They sucker then die back every few years.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33659
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 5:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Is that due to Dutch elm disease still, or are they just a short lived, stunted strain?

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34886
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 5:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nick wrote:
Is that due to Dutch elm disease still, or are they just a short lived, stunted strain?


No, they still have the disease. They fruit, so maybe some resistance will build up eventually.

Nick



Joined: 02 Nov 2004
Posts: 33659
Location: Hereford
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Yeah, good. At least they have a fighting chance to evolve.

Rusticwood



Joined: 01 Dec 2009
Posts: 2117
Location: All over the South West
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 5:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Treacodactyl wrote:


Being pragmatic I'm going to assume the disease will be here in a year or two and start coppicing some of my ash trees, encourage even more diversity and get the seed bed sorted this winter ready for the collection of local seed.



I've heard of others who are going to do something with the Ash they have at the moment rather than leaving it till it needs to be destroyed

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 6:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Midland Spinner wrote:
Treacodactyl wrote:
Being pragmatic I'm going to assume the disease will be here in a year or two and start coppicing some of my ash trees, encourage even more diversity and get the seed bed sorted this winter ready for the collection of local seed.


I wondered whether coppicing would be a bit of a risk in case the fungus enters via the cut surfaces - have you seen any advice one way or the other (apart from the above daft stuff?)


I almost typed the word fell rather than coppice as I'm lucky and got the choice in many places of removing the ash and allowing several other trees to expand.

I would normally be worried of leaving wounds open to infection but if we're going to get 90% or more mortality rates I don't think there's much I can do. The trees get a fair beating during the summer and plenty of branches snap which leaves them open to infection anyway, plus deer damage etc.

I do know some trees can ward off / recover from infection if coppiced but I've no idea how this disease will react.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Rusticwood wrote:
Treacodactyl wrote:


Being pragmatic I'm going to assume the disease will be here in a year or two and start coppicing some of my ash trees, encourage even more diversity and get the seed bed sorted this winter ready for the collection of local seed.



I've heard of others who are going to do something with the Ash they have at the moment rather than leaving it till it needs to be destroyed


Any advice on looking after the timber? They're not huge trees, some trunks are a good thigh size, but I'd like to keep the timber for years to come to make things like tool handles. I plan to keep them unsawn in 2m lengths under cover for now.

Rusticwood



Joined: 01 Dec 2009
Posts: 2117
Location: All over the South West
PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 12 8:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That sort of size I tend to leave as is, bigger I would paint the ends.

You could always make some chairs with it


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