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Ash dieback identification
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TTouch Homestead



Joined: 13 Oct 2011
Posts: 703
Location: Cardigan, West Wales
PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 13 12:45 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

we have loads of ash trees, some huge ones. I am always pulling up small seedlings from the beds, and the borders. Maybe I should start potting them up or create a nursery bed somewhere...

Pilsbury



Joined: 13 Dec 2004
Posts: 5645
Location: East london/Essex
PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 13 1:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I think if you have space for a nursery bed it would be a great idea. At least there would be a,chance of some of them having immunity and coming through unscathed.

TTouch Homestead



Joined: 13 Oct 2011
Posts: 703
Location: Cardigan, West Wales
PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 13 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I am going to find a space to put them tomorrow. Pigs have dug over a corner of the field, so might just use that for now.[/u]

cassy



Joined: 04 Feb 2008
Posts: 1047
Location: South West Scotland
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 13 11:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
http://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/WorrellReport-ChalaraImpacts.pdf/$FILE/WorrellReport-ChalaraImpacts.pdf

Thanks for posting that. A very interesting report esp. the potential impact on lichens and invertebrates and which species are the best replacements to plant.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8318

PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 13 7:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

As our wood has very old (possibly over 1000 years) ash coppice in it, we are hoping that a good proportion of the trees are resistant. Unfortunately nobody really seems to know the effect on coppice ash, as this is not common in Europe. The only advice we have had from Small Woods is to leave some of it as it might be less susceptible uncut, but as it needs cutting or it will fall over, this isn't really an option for us.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14474
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sun Feb 17, 13 1:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Just thinking aloud...

I hear it spreads via the leaf litter, so the advice is to clear up the leaves.
What about replacing that with a mulch of something with fungicidal properties?
Is it rhubarb leaves? What else?

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41569
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 13 1:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Genome sequencing.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8318

PostPosted: Mon Jun 17, 13 5:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Glad some progress is being made. Hope that they will find an answer before it goes much further.

Don't know if it came up, but elm trees are starting to develop a resistance to Dutch elm disease. They used to die off at 15-20 years old, but are now going to over 20. We actually have several wych elms of more than 1 variety in the woods that are not affected. It may be because they are in a wood as the beetle is less likely to find them there, or they may be resistant; we don't know.

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41569
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 13 2:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Killer beetles now.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43845
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed Oct 23, 13 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

sean wrote:
Killer beetles now.


I never did trust Herbie

gregotyn



Joined: 24 Jun 2010
Posts: 1293
Location: Llanfyllin area
PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 13 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I've got lots of small ash saplings, they sort of grow here in mid Wales like weeds. I've seen no sign of the disease but I haven't gone out of my way to look, so not really surprising! I will have a walk round at the w/e.

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 5780
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Thu Nov 07, 13 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
gritstone wrote:
There must be resistant strains surely?

They are hoping that the British trees are more rersistant than Jonny foreigner. Suspect that is nowt but jingoism, but we can hope I am wrong. It does happen sometimes.

But why on Earth were we importing saplings anyway?
I know that ash trees are desparately difficult to propagate, but even so.


I was talking to a tree grower from Somerset, he has done some research into Ash tree history. Apparently there are two genetic groups of Ash trees, Iberian and European. The latter is susceptible to the disease.

Many trees in the West of Britain are of Iberian stock, so will survive.

One source of the disease has been UK seedlings exported to the Nederlands for growing on before being re-imported to nurseries here.

Sorry I don't have sources for this information, but we just got talking at the European Masters Track Champs where we were both competing.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8318

PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 13 8:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

In August we went to a seminar about tree health run by the Forestry Commission and were able to talk to Dr. Joan Webber who is their expert on the disease. She said that if there is a choice in leaving trees, then leave them, but if they are affected by butt rot, as a number of ours are, then fell them. The new growth will get to adult immunity level in about 10 years.

As far as I know, it may be possible to move timber from a site with Chelara, but there are restrictions, and all suspected outbreaks should be reported through the Forestry Commission and any felling, movement etc. done under their direction. Please give as much detail as possible about location, because, 'a dodgy looking ash tree on the M3 between Southampton and Winchester' isn't very helpful.

It now seems that there could have been two waves of infection from imported trees, one about 15 years ago, so the spread may not be as fast in the UK as was first thought.

We live in hopes that our ash trees survive.

Woodburner



Joined: 28 Apr 2006
Posts: 2904
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 13 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
gritstone wrote:
There must be resistant strains surely?

They are hoping that the British trees are more rersistant than Jonny foreigner. Suspect that is nowt but jingoism, but we can hope I am wrong. It does happen sometimes.

But why on Earth were we importing saplings anyway?
I know that ash trees are desparately difficult to propagate, but even so.


That was tongue in cheek, right? They are weeds around here. I encourage them, but I am a hippy, and want them for coppicing ; ) .

Earlier this year, I did see a bit with a suspicious looking blotch on a stem (a bit like rust on hellebores) and not too healthy looking above that, so I pruned it out, and went round looking carefully at all the other saplings. Found one or two more bits and did the same. Haven't seen any more since, but will keep checking when they start into growth again next year.

I'm not too happy with the idea that somewhere not far enough away from me they are planting a thousand or more in close proximity. Have they never heard of the problems associated with mono culture?

Jamanda
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 22 Oct 2006
Posts: 34865
Location: Devon
PostPosted: Fri Nov 08, 13 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I seem to spend all my walks looking for diamond shaped lesions. None thus far.

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