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Knotweed as Biomass
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dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32593
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue May 27, 14 9:54 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

a place to start with digesting it if it either kills normal digester bugs or refuses to ferment might be mince it and try various bacteria ,fungi,yeasts to give a "soup" ready for the methane producing bacteria

iirc part of it's toxicity is oxalic acid so either making that insoluble chemically or denaturing it by some means or reducing it by leeching might help.leeching would have issues of a lot of oxalic acid solution

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32593
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue May 27, 14 12:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

some ingredients

this might give you some ideas as to how to overcome the problems of digesting the stuff

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8427

PostPosted: Wed May 28, 14 8:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

That's very interesting Dpack. Looks like it might be useful.

The acid could be neutralised by using an alkali such as bicarbonate or carbonate of soda (washing soda), or small amounts of sodium or potassium hydroxide. That should produce an oxalate which perhaps won't be as harmful to the bugs.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14556
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Wed May 28, 14 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
The acid could be neutralised by using an alkali such as bicarbonate or carbonate of soda (washing soda), or small amounts of sodium or potassium hydroxide.

Throw in some biodiesel waste: it is mostly a mix of glycerol and hydroxide. The glycerol is known to be beneficial to the digestion already and there is no shortage of it.

oldish chris



Joined: 14 Jun 2006
Posts: 4148
Location: Comfortably Wet Southport
PostPosted: Wed May 28, 14 8:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Its a definite non-starter. For industrial scale production there are other plants, e.g. willow, that can be propagated, for ad-hoc small scale, any old plant will do, and can be composted using the existing municipal schemes.

Japanese knot-weed isn't particularly productive, it uses the same old photosynthesis as all the other plants. Just, unlike all the other plants, it doesn't get chomped by the myriads of insects that eat everything else (starting with my cabbages ). (A sycamore next to your house would do as much damage.)

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14556
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Wed May 28, 14 9:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

oldish chris wrote:
Its a definite non-starter. For industrial scale production there are other plants, e.g. willow, that can be propagated, for ad-hoc small scale, any old plant will do, and can be composted using the existing municipal schemes.

Yes, but the point is, if you already have a patch of knotweed, then why not put it to good use?

What do those who's business it is to get rid of it do with it currently?

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