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tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43857
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed May 13, 15 3:08 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

mousjoos wrote:
Ply is fairly stable depending on the thickness ie anything under 19mm (for furniture) is a bit useless unless housed in a frame

Also makes a difference how it's stored; flat is best, maybe with a small amount of weight on top

MDF is good but again how it is stored up until the time you use it is important...again for furniture 19 mm is most commonly used

If laminating the surface make sure as much as possible that both sides are equal ie the laminate on the outside should be balanced on the inside with laminate of equal thickness, or as near as you can get


Not looking to laminate, just oil both sides. Generally available stuff here is 18mm birch or 20mm poplar ply, we use the birch some of which can be less than 17mm thick (apparently within tolerance)

We're looking to show the ply bands on the edge, would (e.g.) a 12mm panel inset into a 24mm ply frame (2x12mm glued) be more stable than 18mm straight??

mousjoos



Joined: 05 Jun 2006
Posts: 1972
Location: VERY Sunny SW France
PostPosted: Wed May 13, 15 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

In theory there's no reason why not; extra care needs to be taken when jointing ply eg with a biscuit jointer as the core is not homogenous (is that the right word?) like MDF

Depending on the overall size of the door, a frame of 24 (glued or otherwise) with a panel of 12 should be fine

I think you mentioned a size of 1800x600, if so try to incorporate a cross rail that will divide the panel(s)

Standard wooden framework for a kitchen door is generally 65mm wide, so if your design will stand it, make this the minimum...top & bottom cross rails can be that size, but a middle rail 12-15 mm wider adds a smidge more stability

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43857
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 15 4:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Patio table:



Click to see full size image

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43857
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 15 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Nesting table (only 1 yet) from plywood scraps

Click to see full size image




Click to see full size image




Click to see full size image

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32593
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 15 4:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

very Bauhaus,nice

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43857
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 15 5:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't think Bauhaus did cable reels

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32593
Location: yes
PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 15 11:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

i recon the cable reel table is a classic as well ,i have had a few and they are very useful.

they paint quite well and can look ace in either plain or fancy style

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43857
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 16 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

We managed to finish the laundry room (with the copper pipe handles) but I don't seem to have any pics so here's the latest bedside that we've just completed. Still all ply, but we are making a cherry coffee table for my niece soon (from bits of left over stair treads).


Click to see full size image


Click to see full size image

Not our most succesful piece, we found it very difficult to keep the stacked ply sides straight in clamping, we should really have gone oversized and thicknessed to size.

sean
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 41593
Location: North Devon
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 16 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:


Not our most succesful piece, we found it very difficult to keep the stacked ply sides straight in clamping, we should really have gone oversized and thicknessed to size.


Surely you mean 'We decided to go for the hand-crafted artisanal look with this piece.'

Looks OK to me. Certainly better than I'd manage.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43857
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 16 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Just look at the way the drawer sits

You live, and sometimes you learn

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32593
Location: yes
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 16 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

very nice,i admire your patience re making and glueing all those strips.

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43857
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 16 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

It was blinking fiddly, lots of sanding too

mousjoos



Joined: 05 Jun 2006
Posts: 1972
Location: VERY Sunny SW France
PostPosted: Thu May 05, 16 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

tahir wrote:
Just look at the way the drawer sits

You live, and sometimes you learn


For drawer sides whether dovetailed or not, try to use "drawer side ply"...it's not generally called that outside the trade, but is uni directional ply which means edges can be sanded without the need to veneer them first

Drawer sides should be at least a couple of millimetres wider than the front to allow fitting, making sure that all the top edges are flush...DSP also planes well making fitting easy

tahir



Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 43857
Location: Essex
PostPosted: Thu May 05, 16 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

mousjoos wrote:
Drawer sides should be at least a couple of millimetres wider than the front to allow fitting, making sure that all the top edges are flush...DSP also planes well making fitting easy


Sorry, not quite with you there, I know it's going to be difficult to explain on t'internet but is tehre a diagram or something you could point me at? Would love to be better at drawers

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32593
Location: yes
PostPosted: Thu May 05, 16 11:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

re the ply vs mdf thing.

although sheet mdf is fairly stable if dry and stored flat good ply is better .

with either sealing any cut edges before construction ,pilot holes etc during and then sealing inside and out after will increase long term stability.

any large sheets will be more stable if braced.have a look in well made antique furniture etc for tried and tested bracing techniques.

meeting odin in a wardrobe is likely to be rather too exciting when choosing what to wear

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