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mousjoos



Joined: 05 Jun 2006
Posts: 1973
Location: VERY Sunny SW France
PostPosted: Sat Oct 29, 16 3:22 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

Yet more chestnuts
A couple of pocketfuls of walnuts
Three thrush-like birds given to me by my colleague who hunts
A bag of yesterday's bread from a client for the chooks
& a heap of branches for firewood gleaned from the roadside at work

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8726

PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 16 8:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I took a double look at where you were mousjoos, but seeing you were in France, I suppose any bird is fair game. I have just been re-reading 'A Year in Provence' and the section in there about hunting is rather amusing.

mousjoos



Joined: 05 Jun 2006
Posts: 1973
Location: VERY Sunny SW France
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 16 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Not any bird MR, just most birds...
I knew an ex gamekeeper in W Sussex years ago & he ate rook, & blackbirds, amongst other things such as badger
The difference I've found between hunters here & those I knew in UK is that here they eat what they kill, whereas (& my ex brother in law was a case in point) the others hunted for "fun"
I know this isn't true of everyone but the vast majority saw hunting as "a day out playing with guns"...here it's very different

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1700
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 16 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

In today's NY Times: hunting wood pigeons in France.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/31/t-magazine/food/palombe-pigeon-basque-country.html

and 11 pictures

http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2016/10/31/t-magazine/pigeon-from-the-wild-to-the-french-table/s/palombe-slide-JBVT.html

Any comments?

mousjoos



Joined: 05 Jun 2006
Posts: 1973
Location: VERY Sunny SW France
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 16 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I don't understand the context of the "any comments?" at the end.

Firstly here this year the numbers of the pigeons are down as the wind is in the wrong direction, the birds are flying too high & arriving in Spain in therefore greater numbers.

Secondly the Basque traditions of hunting different from those in this region, the Basques having a heavy Spanish influence to them.

The right to hunt was granted by Napolean the (think of a number) apparently, so is jealously & preciously guarded by ordinary French...a case of "use it or lose it"

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32885
Location: yes
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 16 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

wood pigeon are delicious, in the UK they are either a protected bird or avian infestation so you can or cannot shoot them depending what they are doing ,if i understand the basic rule in a tree = protected, eating one's peas vermin (and very tasty)
one of the alternatives to shooting them is find where they cross the road as they often fail to look both ways and also fall victim to high fronted vehicles as they donít climb too well in an emergency

the thing in the casserole looks more like a woodcock ,also delicious and game in the UK.

i tried rook a long time ago ,just once. perhaps young ones are better eating as rook pie was an old time keeper's spring dinner time favourite but the one i found was chewy to say the least and the flavour was no better than fairly horrible.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1700
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Mon Oct 31, 16 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Things are always different abroad. I asked about comments just from curiosity - what do people think about the Basque traditions of shooting wood pigeons.

No wood pigeon here. I've seen then in the Netherlands. Have cooked pigeon / rock dove here (smaller than wood pigeon, city bird, wild type is gray, broad black bar markings but there are numerous fancy breeds.)

Pigeon shoots over in Pennsylvania - caged birds released for shooters. Animal rights people trying to ban the events as cruel and inhumane. They claim birds are wounded, not killed outright.

Never attended a pigeon shoot. I will say that our captive raised pheasants are so tame that it is said they have to be kicked to make them fly so they are legal to shoot. I have seen wild pheasants in Connecticut. Here in New Jersey I occasionally see a stray cock bird, never hens.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8726

PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 16 6:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Pigeons shot in the UK are mainly to keep them off the crops, but a fair number are eaten too. Someone I worked with used to go shooting pigeons, and one morning when he gave me a lift into work, he told me to hold a carrier bag open, then tipped in a dozen dead pigeons. They were distributed around at work. Haven't had pigeon, but a couple of dozy pheasants that committed suicide, one flying into a gate, the other under the car wheels.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1700
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Tue Nov 01, 16 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

One long ago winter I saw a dead ruffed grouse on the road. Stopped car. Felt between wing and body - still warm. Had flown into a car and broke its neck, I think. So I took it home and we had it for dinner.

And one time I was in town and the owner of a wildlife art gallery had been out shooting ducks. He gave me three. Which I brought home, dressed, and we had them for dinner.

Another time a friend gave me a pheasant she had been given - didn't want to deal with it. I offered to show her how to dress it but no, no, wanted nothing to do with it. My good luck.

It's funny / amusing what people will / will not be willing to do - I find dressing game birds perfectly acceptable.

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8726

PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 16 7:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Must say for things like rabbits and unexpected birds, I have to get my trusty Cookery Year book out which tells me how to deal with them. Son phoned me once and said if he brought a rabbit home from work could I deal with it. Also ended up with a haunch of venison from a deer that had just been frightened to death by a dog attacking it.

Jam Lady



Joined: 28 Dec 2006
Posts: 1700
Location: New Jersey, USA
PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 16 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I will give credit to my year-long college course in comparative anatomy which have been useful in a way my professor did not perhaps intend. It has been very useful when cutting up birds (ducks are so different from chickens etc), venison forequarter & hindquarter, woodchuck and raccoon.

Calculus and differential equations, on the other hand, have not.

dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32885
Location: yes
PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 16 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

today's hound scamper provided about a kilo of oyster shrooms which were lightly salted , then they dripped for a couple of hours on the rack before being mopped dryish.

they are now cold smoking over beech shavings in a drafty place and will be sliced and pickled in blueberry balsamic vinegar once they are about dried to about 1/3 of the original water content.

very yum with cheese, cold meats or even on a pizza.

bubble



Joined: 13 Apr 2008
Posts: 960

PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 16 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

From a few days ago . Clitocybe geotropa

gz



Joined: 23 Jan 2009
Posts: 5837
Location: Ayrshire, Scotland
PostPosted: Tue Dec 27, 16 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

beautiful...and the basket too

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