Home Page
   Articles
       links
About Us    
Traders        
Recipes            
Latest Articles
himalayan balsam, not all bad
Page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Conservation and Environment
Author 
 Message
Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14556
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 16 9:52 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote    

buzzy wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
buzzy wrote:
Being a fast growing annual I expect the plants are of little use for biomass fuel.

Anything can go into anaerobic digestion to make gas...


I'm sure you are right. The question is "Does HB produce enough gas to make it worthwhile cutting, collecting and transporting it?"

The better question is: can we set up a digester at this place with a HB infestation?

The cutting and collecting is wanting to happen anyway to control the problem. The gas is a bonus.

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 4450
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 16 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Perhaps those eradicating it need a lesson on seed disperal of the genus Impatiens and why it would be inappropriate to just throw them around if you're trying to get rid of them

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UiCRJE9e88

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3010
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 16 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
buzzy wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
buzzy wrote:
Being a fast growing annual I expect the plants are of little use for biomass fuel.

Anything can go into anaerobic digestion to make gas...


I'm sure you are right. The question is "Does HB produce enough gas to make it worthwhile cutting, collecting and transporting it?"

The better question is: can we set up a digester at this place with a HB infestation?

The cutting and collecting is wanting to happen anyway to control the problem. The gas is a bonus.


I'm not sure it's a better question, just the same question asked in a slightly different way. Replace 'transporting' with 'setting up a digester and removing it when the HB is cleared'.

Henry

Mistress Rose



Joined: 21 Jul 2011
Posts: 8419

PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 16 7:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Many years ago I thought that digesting waste rather than burying it was a good idea, and it seems to have happened. Sadly I have never had the knowledge or been in the right industry to make these things happen, but it is nice to know that they eventually do. Perhaps a small volume one to take round to sites with things like HB, severe ragwort infestations etc. might be a good idea. If all else failed, perhaps they could store the gas so that it could be used to power their transport, so apart from the cost in money and energy making the thing, it would be carbon neutral.

Treacodactyl
Downsizer Moderator


Joined: 28 Oct 2004
Posts: 25697
Location: Jumping on the bandwagon of opportunism
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 16 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

buzzy wrote:
Treacodactyl wrote:
buzzy wrote:
As I recall, HB grows from seeds, which it produces in great profusion. Thus it is important to pull or cut it before it flowers. Stuff you pull just dies, but if there are seed pods close to ripening, they will help the spread! Being a fast growing annual I expect the plants are of little use for biomass fuel.


It can also root from broken pieces during the growing season, if you look at the stems they're covered in little roots waiting to come into contact with some soil. Whole plants can also get washed down stream only to wash up and carry on growing.


Thanks. I didn't know that - and I've not come into close enough contact with it to have seen detail of the stems. I just know it seeds very well.

Henry


Here's a pic of a small plant that's probably floated down the stream and re-rooted. The original roots on the right and the lower two nodes have sprouted roots. I snapped it whilst pulling it out so not a great photo.


dpack



Joined: 02 Jul 2005
Posts: 32591
Location: yes
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 16 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

it is a very persistent and "enthusiastic" plant ,in the wrong place (most places are wrong ) it is a rather bad development but in some circumstances it does seem to enrich the biosphere rather than smother and monoculture it.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14556
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 16 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Mistress Rose wrote:
Many years ago I thought that digesting waste rather than burying it was a good idea, and it seems to have happened. Sadly I have never had the knowledge or been in the right industry to make these things happen, but it is nice to know that they eventually do. Perhaps a small volume one to take round to sites with things like HB, severe ragwort infestations etc. might be a good idea...

There is nothing complicated about methane digestion: you can do it with not much more than a couple of buckets. It's not quick though: takes a week or few before you start getting useable gas.

buzzy



Joined: 04 Jan 2011
Posts: 3010
Location: In a small wood on the edge of the Huntingdonshire Wolds
PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 16 11:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
Mistress Rose wrote:
Many years ago I thought that digesting waste rather than burying it was a good idea, and it seems to have happened. Sadly I have never had the knowledge or been in the right industry to make these things happen, but it is nice to know that they eventually do. Perhaps a small volume one to take round to sites with things like HB, severe ragwort infestations etc. might be a good idea...

There is nothing complicated about methane digestion: you can do it with not much more than a couple of buckets. It's not quick though: takes a week or few before you start getting useable gas.


Are there any plans available for a (reasonably) portable methane digester that includes efficient storage for the gas produced?

Henry

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14556
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sat Oct 22, 16 12:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote    

buzzy wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
Mistress Rose wrote:
Many years ago I thought that digesting waste rather than burying it was a good idea, and it seems to have happened. Sadly I have never had the knowledge or been in the right industry to make these things happen, but it is nice to know that they eventually do. Perhaps a small volume one to take round to sites with things like HB, severe ragwort infestations etc. might be a good idea...

There is nothing complicated about methane digestion: you can do it with not much more than a couple of buckets. It's not quick though: takes a week or few before you start getting useable gas.


Are there any plans available for a (reasonably) portable methane digester that includes efficient storage for the gas produced?

There are plenty of plans available until you come to that last requirement. For that, the only one I've found so far is the one in my head...

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 4450
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Sat Oct 22, 16 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Hairyloon wrote:
buzzy wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
Mistress Rose wrote:
Many years ago I thought that digesting waste rather than burying it was a good idea, and it seems to have happened. Sadly I have never had the knowledge or been in the right industry to make these things happen, but it is nice to know that they eventually do. Perhaps a small volume one to take round to sites with things like HB, severe ragwort infestations etc. might be a good idea...

There is nothing complicated about methane digestion: you can do it with not much more than a couple of buckets. It's not quick though: takes a week or few before you start getting useable gas.


Are there any plans available for a (reasonably) portable methane digester that includes efficient storage for the gas produced?

There are plenty of plans available until you come to that last requirement. For that, the only one I've found so far is the one in my head...


I can't imagine the amusement is worth the brain cells lost when it comes to huffing methane

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14556
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Sat Oct 22, 16 9:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Slim wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
buzzy wrote:
Hairyloon wrote:
Mistress Rose wrote:
Many years ago I thought that digesting waste rather than burying it was a good idea, and it seems to have happened. Sadly I have never had the knowledge or been in the right industry to make these things happen, but it is nice to know that they eventually do. Perhaps a small volume one to take round to sites with things like HB, severe ragwort infestations etc. might be a good idea...

There is nothing complicated about methane digestion: you can do it with not much more than a couple of buckets. It's not quick though: takes a week or few before you start getting useable gas.


Are there any plans available for a (reasonably) portable methane digester that includes efficient storage for the gas produced?

There are plenty of plans available until you come to that last requirement. For that, the only one I've found so far is the one in my head...


I can't imagine the amusement is worth the brain cells lost when it comes to huffing methane

A plan you fool, not a storage for methane.

Bodger



Joined: 23 May 2006
Posts: 13458

PostPosted: Sun Oct 23, 16 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

I first came across HB nearly forty years ago. This was when I was mink hunting with The Border Counties Mink hounds and it was on the river banks. I can well understand how it spreads down stream but where I live now, we even have it on the cliff tops.

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14556
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 16 6:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

There are plans afoot to address a local problem with HB and other invasive weeds so I want to give this idea of digesting them some proper thought.
A digester is fairly easy to build: you can make one out of an IBC or an old barrel or whatever, but it seems to me the harder part is how to mash up the bulk of the biomass and get it in the tank.

I'm thinking that there could be a series of digesters, and one portable plant mashing device, but I'm not aware of any suitable machine...

Any thoughts?

Slim



Joined: 05 Mar 2006
Posts: 4450
Location: New England (In the US of A)
PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 16 6:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

A small wood chipper would do the trick I would think...

Hairyloon



Joined: 20 Nov 2008
Posts: 14556
Location: Today I are mostly being in Yorkshire.
PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 16 7:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote    

Slim wrote:
A small wood chipper would do the trick I would think...

For the amount of stuff I think we are talking about, a small chipper would be tedious, and a larger chipper tends to fling stuff about rather vigorously, but if the area is infested anyway, that latter shouldn't matter. Might be worth a try.

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Downsizer Forum Index -> Conservation and Environment All times are GMT
Page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Page 2 of 3
View Latest Posts View Latest Posts

 

Archive
Powered by php-BB © 2001, 2005 php-BB Group
Style by marsjupiter.com, released under GNU (GNU/GPL) license.
Copyright 2004 marsjupiter.com

<-- -->