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Hammer Man

Air Rifle questions from a newbie.

Hello, I have eaten smoked pigeon breast in the pub before but wondered if it is a certain type of pigeon and are there any rules about shooting one with my air rifle to eat? Any advice greatly appreciated.


And While we're at it, what other animals can I shoot to eat if any?

Thanks.
Old-Chads-Orchard

With an air rifle, rabbit & squirrell BUT headshots required, so you need to be hitting a 10p at 30yrd.
Never shot pigeon with an air rifle, always use a shotgun
sean

You need a headshot to kill a pigeon with an air rifle.
Hammer Man

Headshots are not a problem, I don't want to sound like an arrogant so and so but I'm a good shot. I just wondered on the legalities of it.

I didn't realise people eat Squirrel! There are hundreds of rabbits round here. Can I just go along and shoot them (headshots) or do I need some kind of permit or something?

Thank you for your responses so far.
sean

You'll need permission form the landowner. Insurance (which you can get by joining BASC) is essentail too.
Hammer Man

Thanks sean. Very Happy
vegplot

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 states that it is an offence to kill any bird - including pigeons - unless a licence is held, but section one allows exemption if an organisation or individual complies with general licence regulations.

Shooting pigeon as part of pest control is a valid reason and falls under the general licence terms.

See www.basc.org.uk for further information.
Hammer Man

vegplot wrote:
The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 states that it is an offence to kill any bird - including pigeons - unless a licence is held, but section one allows exemption if an organisation or individual complies with general licence regulations.

Shooting pigeon as part of pest control is a valid reason and falls under the general licence terms.

See www.basc.org.uk for further information.


What licence is that? Is it a licence for the weapon or a licence specificly for shooting birds? Thanks for the link, I am already browsing that site! Lots of reading to do!
vegplot

Hammer Man wrote:
vegplot wrote:
The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 states that it is an offence to kill any bird - including pigeons - unless a licence is held, but section one allows exemption if an organisation or individual complies with general licence regulations.

Shooting pigeon as part of pest control is a valid reason and falls under the general licence terms.

See www.basc.org.uk for further information.


What licence is that? Is it a licence for the weapon or a licence specificly for shooting birds? Thanks for the link, I am already browsing that site! Lots of reading to do!


You don't need the licence, it's a general open licence. You do need to satisfy the conditions of the licence to remain legal.

Look under http://www.basc.org.uk/content/pestandpredatorcontrol
Hammer Man

vegplot wrote:
Hammer Man wrote:
vegplot wrote:
The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 states that it is an offence to kill any bird - including pigeons - unless a licence is held, but section one allows exemption if an organisation or individual complies with general licence regulations.

Shooting pigeon as part of pest control is a valid reason and falls under the general licence terms.

See www.basc.org.uk for further information.


What licence is that? Is it a licence for the weapon or a licence specificly for shooting birds? Thanks for the link, I am already browsing that site! Lots of reading to do!


You don't need the licence, it's a general open licence. You do need to satisfy the conditions of the licence to remain legal.

Look under http://www.basc.org.uk/content/pestandpredatorcontrol


vegplot, thank you very much for that link. You are a great help! I now understand (got there in the end, sorry!) What are land owners like as a rule when it comes to getting permission? Think I will go and knock on the farmers door round the corner and have a chat with him..
Brownbear

Hammer Man wrote:
Think I will go and knock on the farmers door round the corner and have a chat with him..


That is by far the best course. I don't mean to offend, but if you're a youngster, it might be a good idea to try to find some local shooters who would take you out and show you the ropes in exchange for your assisting them, carrying stuff and generally being their gimp for a while.

You can get a lot of very useful knowledge and experience that way. If you're older, you could join something like BASC or the Countryside Alliance and go along to their local branch meetings. Shooters are a friendly lot on the whole and like to share their knowledge with newcomers. This knowledge isn't always the best, but thank them for it anyway, and as you gain experience you'll learn to sort the wheat from the chaff.
Hammer Man

Brownbear wrote:
Hammer Man wrote:
Think I will go and knock on the farmers door round the corner and have a chat with him..


That is by far the best course. I don't mean to offend, but if you're a youngster, it might be a good idea to try to find some local shooters who would take you out and show you the ropes in exchange for your assisting them, carrying stuff and generally being their gimp for a while.

You can get a lot of very useful knowledge and experience that way. If you're older, you could join something like BASC or the Countryside Alliance and go along to their local branch meetings. Shooters are a friendly lot on the whole and like to share their knowledge with newcomers. This knowledge isn't always the best, but thank them for it anyway, and as you gain experience you'll learn to sort the wheat from the chaff.


Hi Brownbear,

No offence taken. I probably come across as a youngster for the simple reason I have never done anything like this before and am therefore probably asking the same questions as a youngster. Since leaving the forces I have only shot my air rifle and thats only been at paper targets!! Thank you for the advice, I appreciate your time.
Hammer Man

Does anyone know how I can findout how powerful my air rifle is? I was told when I bought it that is under 12 ft lb and therfore doesn't need a firearms licence, but I don't know exactly how powerful it is. If I am going to do this I want to be completely legal with proper permission and insurance and rather than go out with this rifle only to find it doesn't give a clean kill, I would sooner buy a new one that is just over 11 ft lb. If I can find out for sure that this is powerful enough then I would use this one but I would hate to cause unnecessary suffering.

I have changed the title of this thread as it has changed slightly from the original 'Pigeon question'.
gil

there have been various previous threads that have touched on this subject

try this one

(off to find more)

more discussion
vegplot

Find someone with a chronograph and measure the pellet velocity at or near the muzzle. Next weigh or look at the pellet tin lid to find its weight.

Energy, in ft.lbs, is calculated thus:

Energy = pellet weight * velocity * velocity / 450450

Where pellet weight is in grains and velocity is in feet per second.

If you take your air rifle to a gun dealer who finds it to be over the legal limit you won't get it back and you could get prosecuted for having a non-licenced firearm.
Hammer Man

Off to the gunshop this week then. I doubt very much that it is over the 12ft lb limit as it was bought from a friend that I would trust with my life. If however, he has made a mistake or was ill advised himself then I would be happy for it to be confiscated and I would buy one that is below this limit. As for prosecution, I would have to cross that bridge when it comes - will find out this week won't I!!??
vegplot

Hammer Man wrote:
Off to the gunshop this week then. I doubt very much that it is over the 12ft lb limit as it was bought from a friend that I would trust with my life. If however, he has made a mistake or was ill advised himself then I would be happy for it to be confiscated and I would buy one that is below this limit. As for prosecution, I would have to cross that bridge when it comes - will find out this week won't I!!??


You're acting in good faith and that's good. Have you ever thought of applying for a firearms certificate? Bunny tastes good.
Hammer Man

vegplot wrote:
Hammer Man wrote:
Off to the gunshop this week then. I doubt very much that it is over the 12ft lb limit as it was bought from a friend that I would trust with my life. If however, he has made a mistake or was ill advised himself then I would be happy for it to be confiscated and I would buy one that is below this limit. As for prosecution, I would have to cross that bridge when it comes - will find out this week won't I!!??


You're acting in good faith and that's good. Have you ever thought of applying for a firearms certificate? Bunny tastes good.


Well, I wouldn't want it falling into the wrong hands so there is no way I would sell it on without knowing myself for sure. Would rather get a beasting from the gunshop owner and then try to convince a court that I was trying to do the right thing!

As for a firearms certificate, no I've never thought about it really. I'd like to own a .22 rifle like I used to fire on the rifle ranges as a cadet but don't really know whats involved in getting a certificate - cost, requirements to be met etc. I will start off with an air rifle (provided I get permission to shot on someones land that is) and possibly look into getting a certificate later on as I get into it. As I said, since leaving the forces I've only shot paper targets with an air rifle!!
Brownbear

Spring air rifles can sometimes 'creep up' in power after they're set up with no criminality involved. A decent gun shop will check it for you and make any adjustments.

Try the PigeonWatch forums to make contact with local pigeon shooters - you'll need a shotgun to shoot pigeon, but 50 for the certificate, another 50 for a cabinet and then 250+ for the gun will get you a reasonable setup. Where are you based?
Hammer Man

Brownbear wrote:
Spring air rifles can sometimes 'creep up' in power after they're set up with no criminality involved. A decent gun shop will check it for you and make any adjustments.

Try the PigeonWatch forums to make contact with local pigeon shooters - you'll need a shotgun to shoot pigeon, but 50 for the certificate, another 50 for a cabinet and then 250+ for the gun will get you a reasonable setup. Where are you based?


Do the majority of people shoot shotgun then? If so is there a reason for this? I think I would prefer a rifle to a shotgun if I were going to get anything more powerful than an air rifle. My step father owns a shotgun though (he only shoots clays) so I might ask him if I can go along and have a go with him on the clays. I am based in Rutland (UK not USA)

Thanks for the help so far guys thumbright
vegplot

If rifle is your game then you'll do no worse than joining your local club. If it's home office approved, which most are, then you'll be able to use this to justify getting a rifle.

If you don't join a club then the process can be more difficult as you'll need to get permission to shoot on land and have that land registered for the calibre you want to use over it. You'd need to do this anyway but joining a club is the quicker route. A club also offers the advantage of being in close contact with other shooters who''l be able to offer advice etc. It will also give you the opportunity to try different guns and judge whether shooting is for you.

There are a few threads on this topic on this forum please use the search facility to see what's been said before. There are a few shooters here and Brownbear is your man if you're interested in field shooting but others here will have something valuable to say as well.

Personally, I don't shoot for the pot, I would if I had land to shoot over and the time to do it.
Hammer Man

vegplot wrote:
If rifle is your game then you'll do no worse than joining your local club. If it's home office approved, which most are, then you'll be able to use this to justify getting a rifle.

If you don't join a club then the process can be more difficult as you'll need to get permission to shoot on land and have that land registered for the calibre you want to use over it. You'd need to do this anyway but joining a club is the quicker route. A club also offers the advantage of being in close contact with other shooters who''l be able to offer advice etc. It will also give you the opportunity to try different guns and judge whether shooting is for you.

There are a few threads on this topic on this forum please use the search facility to see what's been said before. There are a few shooters here and Brownbear is your man if you're interested in field shooting but others here will have something valuable to say as well.

Personally, I don't shoot for the pot, I would if I had land to shoot over and the time to do it.


Hi again vegplot,

I will indeed use the search facility, thanks for the advice. I have already ben having a good look around and am amazed at some of the pictures!! If using a shotgun though, does the same permission and land registration not apply?

Thanks again for your help.
vegplot

Hammer Man wrote:
If using a shotgun though, does the same permission and land registration not apply?


You just need permission from the owner or an authorised person, the land doesn't have to be registered with the police. Safe shooting.
Hammer Man

Looks like I have some decisions to make then! In the meantime I will get the air rifle looked at and have a word with the farmer near me and then go from there. Thanks for all the help guys, I appreciate it.
Hammer Man

That was a wasted journey! The gunshop has gone!! No idea how long ago as I've never been in it before anyway but a little bit frustrating!! Oh well, looks like I will have to head over to Liecester or something... Do you suppose someone at the gun club where my stepdad shoots his shotgun will be able to check it for me?
vegplot

Some gun clubs have a chronograph. While not expensive they only tend to be bought by those who do a lot of reloading and like to know how their loads are performing.

You can only ask.
Hammer Man

Thanks, I'll give him a call and ask him to ask around when he goes down there next..
Hammer Man

Finally had the Air rifle checked. Its just over 10.5ft lb so I need to go and collect it back from my stepdad. I was a little nervous about the result but am pleased to hear its legal! My stepdad is going to take me clay shooting with him so I can see what I think. Can't wait!

Do you guys think 10.5ft lb is powerful enough to give a clean kill or should I be looking for a new one closer to the 12ft lb limit?
Old-Chads-Orchard

That will be fine out to 35yrds, google "chairgun" good program on balistics, interesting to see how much energy a pellet has out to certain distances.
You will find most new guns are set to around 10.5-11 lb/ft to keep the makers safe, as most rifles increase slightly in power as the barrel gets leaded in.
dpack

avoid bunnies who live in blackthorn Wink Embarassed
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