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OtleyLad

At last an upstairs shower! - question about insulation

We're finally going to put in a shower room upstairs after talking about it for about 8 years (we don't rush into things here).

So we're dividing an existing room with a stud partition wall. Thing is the regs expect that the wall will be have sound insulation. As the shower will be against the new wall we also want to use these Aquapanels behind the tiles as they are water resistant.
For the sound insulation we're looking at these.
My questions are: Is a single layer of these sound-proofing boards (i.e. on one side of the stud wall only-plain plasterboard on the other) sufficient esp if we use this slab insulation between the studs?
Do I simply fix the Aquapanel over the sound insulation boards?

Any suggestions welcome...
Hairyloon

Fill the stud wall with something like rockwool or other loft insulation: you don't need anything fancy.
crofter

Fill the stud wall with something like rockwool or other loft insulation: you don't need anything fancy.


I agree with this, the "acoustic" rockwool in the link is only 30mm thick and seems quite expensive. Fill the studwork with 100mm "normal" rockwool and use the blue plasterboard.
Nick

Only thing I can say is that when I've taken down walls with soft insulation in them is its all slumped to the bottom. So the bottom of the wall might be well insulated...

So, if you go for the economy route, make sure it's fixed in place.
OtleyLad

Fill the stud wall with something like rockwool or other loft insulation: you don't need anything fancy.


I agree with this, the "acoustic" rockwool in the link is only 30mm thick and seems quite expensive. Fill the studwork with 100mm "normal" rockwool and use the blue plasterboard.

One one or both sides of the wall?

And do I simply fix the Aquapanel on top on the shower side?
dpack

pea netting and drawing pins to fasten it to the studs will hold rockwool in place and avoid slumping without squashing it too much.

waterproof plaster board shower side

the waterproof shower panels need good fitting to avoid any leaks
OtleyLad

pea netting and drawing pins to fasten it to the studs will hold rockwool in place and avoid slumping without squashing it too much.
Thanks for that tip.

waterproof plaster board shower side
Fixed on top of the blue (sound-proofing board)? If so it will sit proud of the rest of the wall?


the waterproof shower panels need good fitting to avoid any leaks
Luckily the I should only need a single joint between the boards in the shower corner.
dpack

water resistant board in the shower room will help avoid problems from condensation etc iirc it does not need to be donebut if you are reboarding it does no harm. the sound proof and shower walls will sort that area .
if there are any changes of level good quality beading fitted well will avoid any odd looking steps.
i know regs insist on a fan but they are quite drafty in winter and often wear a shower hat so things can get a bit steamy Wink

ps if painting the walls use full fat eggshell rather than the low solvent stuff which is pants
Hairyloon

Only thing I can say is that when I've taken down walls with soft insulation in them is its all slumped to the bottom. So the bottom of the wall might be well insulated...
I'd suggest that perhaps the insulation was too soft or there was not enough of it. Also, you should have noggins around half way up, so at least the bottom and the upper middle should be well insulated. Wink
vegplot

Are you able to get off cuts of Kingspan rigid insulation? crofter

One one or both sides of the wall?

And do I simply fix the Aquapanel on top on the shower side?

Blue on the outside for soundproofing (2 layers, broken jointed if you have plenty of space and want to go OTT) No need for plasterboard inside if you are using aquapanel - never seen it used but I assume it is screwed directly on the studs? Sometimes chipboard behind the boards inside the bathroom is specced though, to allow easy fitting of grab rails etc in the future.
crofter

Are you able to get off cuts of Kingspan rigid insulation?

Is kingspan better than rockwool for soundproofing? I don't know, but my gut feeling is that rockwool would be better...
vegplot

Are you able to get off cuts of Kingspan rigid insulation?

Is kingspan better than rockwool for soundproofing? I don't know, but my gut feeling is that rockwool would be better...

Possibly. Combined with Aquapanel the amount of acoustic attenuation would be reasonable, you'd be hard pushed to tell the difference between the two. In perspective it's not a sound studio.
OtleyLad

Are you able to get off cuts of Kingspan rigid insulation?

I don't know of a local source.
OtleyLad

One one or both sides of the wall?

And do I simply fix the Aquapanel on top on the shower side?

Blue on the outside for soundproofing (2 layers, broken jointed if you have plenty of space and want to go OTT) No need for plasterboard inside if you are using aquapanel - never seen it used but I assume it is screwed directly on the studs? Sometimes chipboard behind the boards inside the bathroom is specced though, to allow easy fitting of grab rails etc in the future.

The aquapanel needs to be on top of the soundproofing though. maybe we're getting inside/outside mixed up here?

I'm thinking on the side of the wall facing the bathroom there's soundproofing board with aquapanel on top where the shower is to sit.
On the other side of the wall (facing the bedroom) there's to be just plain plasterboard.
With rockwool/whatever in between.

Sound about right?
Nick

Are you able to get off cuts of Kingspan rigid insulation?

I don't know of a local source.

Has to be worth an ask on freecycle. I've seen them many times, and you don't sound like you're after lots.
vegplot

I shouldn't overly worry about the sound proofing aspect. Unless you're aquatic you'll only be showering a few minutes in the day and who are you disturbing? OtleyLad

I shouldn't overly worry about the sound proofing aspect. Unless you're aquatic you'll only be showering a few minutes in the day and who are you disturbing?

I imagine the building regs regarding insulation are there to protect the outside world from the heaving, grunting, splashng and plopping noises emanating from the loo rather than the shower. Or perhaps its to mitigate the kareoke tendancies of some bathers?
onemanband

I shouldn't overly worry about the sound proofing aspect. Unless you're aquatic you'll only be showering a few minutes in the day and who are you disturbing?

I imagine the building regs regarding insulation are there to protect the outside world from the heaving, grunting, splashng and plopping noises emanating from the loo rather than the shower. Or perhaps its to mitigate the kareoke tendancies of some bathers?

Yep(to VP and OL) and building control probably won't even see the insulation.... a visit at the start to see any lintels and drainage connections, and a visit at the end to see there's a fan, electric cert, etc
What the others said ...... 100mm rockwool is standard practice.
vegplot

Do you have to comply with building regs? Who would know about it?
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