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Jonnyboy

At last!







sean

Happy bunny then? Congratulations.
Jonnyboy

Very happy, you wouldn't believe the amount of overpriced crap I've been to see recently.
sally_in_wales

what will you call it?
Jonnyboy

Dunno yet, I think the kids have first dibs on that. Last boat was called glenoria, but it came with that name Confused
sean

You could name it after your mortgage company. Wink
Blue Sky

Congrats!

I must say I am pleased to see the presence of oarlocks there too for when you just cannot be bothered to send the Mrs down to the local petty station for more fuel. Wink

Nice one. Here's wishing you many years of happy boating.
dougal

sally_in_wales wrote:
what will you call it?


How about "Our Ark" ?
Jonnyboy

Excuse me, it's not that old.
sean

The Bootle Bumtrinket.
bingo

What's wrong with the name it's already got? Confused
bingo

For Sale is a nice name!


bingo

Or maybe For Sail? Laughing

Boom, Boom! Laughing
Jonnyboy

bingo wrote:
What's wrong with the name it's already got? Confused


It ain't got one! Laughing
bingo

I thought it was called For Sale, judging by the big name board. Confused
pricey

Nice one mate, I never thought you were going to get it before Winter.

How about, Jonsfujir Wink
Bebo

How about 'This Way Up'.
sean

You'll need a bigger motor than that if you're going to get it to plane.
Treacodactyl

Looks nice, are you able to give a rough idea of the price?
Jonnyboy

sean wrote:
You'll need a bigger motor than that if you're going to get it to plane.


With a hull like that it'll never be a flyer. I'll be looking out for a 15hp but that will be fine for now.
Jonnyboy

Treacodactyl wrote:
Looks nice, are you able to give a rough idea of the price?


I can give you an exact idea Laughing 1400. Boat is in very good condition, engine looks good, trailer is fine, but needs a few little additions to help with loading and unloading. Overall I'm very happy.

She's a darragh 14, and irish make similar to the orkney spinner or dell quay fisher.
bingo

Bebo wrote:
How about 'This Way Up'.
Laughing
Treacodactyl

The boat looks almost new from the photos. How many people could she carry and when's your first trip?
Jonnyboy

I'd be happy with 4 adults at most. You could probably get 4 adults and 2 kids at a push.

Keep the questions coming Laughing I'm writing an article on beginners, basic boats so it's good to know what people want to find out.

EDIT: need to buy a few bits and pieces for her but first test run will be on the local river midweek, then out for the mackerel next weekend, weather permitting.
Treacodactyl

Well.... I was wondering how you tell a good boat from a bad one. Is similar to a car in that you check for a well maintained boat without any obvious bodges etc? As for gauging the price is it just experience or do you get an price guides like cars? Do you have to register it especially when you've named her?
Jonnyboy

Treacodactyl wrote:
Well.... I was wondering how you tell a good boat from a bad one. Is similar to a car in that you check for a well maintained boat without any obvious bodges etc?


That's pretty much it, most are grp now so you can see how well they've been maintained, if there are any cracks in the transom from using too powerful an engine, if it has holes in it from previously installed and removed equipment. I would always go for an unpainted boat, as a paint job on a grp boat can hide a multitude of sins... But I'm fairly 'green' and I can spot a good one from a bad one, it's just common sense and a bit of nosing around


Quote:
As for gauging the price is it just experience or do you get an price guides like cars? Do you have to register it especially when you've named her?


Some boats attract a premium, any orkney will, but if you get a decent bonwitco it's a far better boat for the money.

It really depends on what you want to do with it. For summer inshore fishing, mackerel and a few pots - 5k will leave you totally spoiled for choice. But at the lower end you need to spend some time looking at dogs until you find a decent 'un.

Take a look at the boats here the dell quay fisher is similar to mine and 2k dearer, the bonwitco is similar to my last one and again priced much higher.

No need to register unless you're commercial IIRC. I had a RNLI sea check (for free) with my last boat and they didn't specify it. But to be honest in hindsight that check was only suitable for people going a couple of miles out. the guy was talking about fitting radar reflectors - total overkill for what I wanted to do, but that said I did pick up a few pointers
Treacodactyl

Thanks for the answers, very useful. Do you need or is it advisable to take out insurance and before you set sail is there a recommended amount of kit you should take? Before I seriously consider a boat I'll book a trip with someone and ask them plenty of questions as well. Laughing
Jonnyboy

Yes to both, I would recommend that anyone involved in any public sport or hobby take out some kind of third party insurance.
dougal

Jonnyboy wrote:
...
Keep the questions coming Laughing I'm writing an article on beginners, basic boats so it's good to know what people want to find out. ...

AFAIK, you don't have to have any "driving license" or equivalent. One can buy a boat, launch it and sail (or chug) away.
Again AFAIK, there's no requirement for insurance, either.
But insurance (3rd party & loss/damage) seems like a sensible idea, as does an elementary competence in seamanship and navigation.

Do the insurance companies impose any competency criteria?


Again AFAIK (unless you are operating commercially), I don't think there's any legal obligations as regards carrying any safety equipment, at all.
Clearly *some* would be sensible...
What would you advise (together with an outline of the costs, as well as storage life for things like distress flares)?
Jonnyboy

You're correct, you don't need any thing, but it is advisable (likewise if you shoot or even ski for example) to have some third party insurance.

My basic safety kit is

Inshore marine flares (35 quid I think)
100 newton lifejackets for all (30 and upwards)
anchor, chain and rope (20 and upwards)
first aid kit (10 - 15)
fire extinguisher (10-20)
secondary propulsion (oars are sufficient) (25 - 500 for an outboard)
mobile phone
VHF (if you have the money for the course and radio)

all the above excluding the VHF or mobile should cost you less than 200.
bernie-woman

The boat looks lovely - they are cheaper than I thought they were Confused my OH has been wittering about bying a boat for the past few months and I have ignored him on the basis that we would have to spend much more than 2k Very Happy

Why are boats called 'she' Confused
Fee

It's Paul not Fee here

but please please please get a VHF radio, the coastguard can use the signal to direction find and pinpoint your location. When I was a lifeboat crew we used to spend hours searching people who'd run out of fuel and didn't have a clue where they were.

Looks like a good boat to me. I'd keep to the little engine if it was me though, burn less fuel, easier to move and lift and a non planing boat like that won't go any faster than it's hull speed no matter how much power you put into it.

Have fun Very Happy
Jonnyboy

Cheers for the advice, you're right about the engine. I was originally thinking about a 15 but with that hull I might either leave the 4 or max out with an 8 or 9.9.

It's also a good point about the vhf, but I've found the course way overpriced and oversubscribed over here, and I really don't go further than line of sight from newcastle RNLI station. I may just get a vhf and risk the consequences if I need to use it unlicensed.
Fee

It's dead easy,

remember when you have the button pressed only you can talk.

say who you're trying to talk to, (local coastguard) say who you are (fishing vessel 'for sail') say what you want to say, could we have a radio check please' etc and then say 'over'.

IIRC it's channel 16 to get hold of the c'guard in an emergency.

you should be able to get a small handheld job for under 100.

It means that if the worst comes to the worst and you need a tow the lifeboat will get given a grid ref to go to rather than 'the white boat south of the headland'. Of course murphy's law states quite clearly that if you spend a wad of your hard earned on a VHF you'll never need it but there we go..

mackrel are delicious though....
dougal

According to the RYA:
Quote:
Maritime Radio Operator's Certificate
Without a maritime radio operator's certificate, a VHF radio may be monitored for safety purposes or used to summon assistance in a distress situation, but it may not be used for general transmissions. General transmissions can only be made by a licensed operator or by someone under the direct supervision of a licensed operator.
However, the 'Ship Radio' equipment would need to be licensed!
http://www.rya.org.uk/KnowledgeBase/regulationsandsafety/ukcoastalwaters/vhflicencing.htm

I'd also suggest that a proper chart of the local area and a sighting compass would be an absolute minimum of navigational equipment. A basic (hiker's rainproof) GPS would be a nice suppliment.

I'd further suggest a waterproof torch and a sea-anchor as being highly desirable (and pretty inexpensive) safety items.
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