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Rob R

Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?

As discussed here there are many reasons we may want to boycott supermarkets and we all know (well, nearly all) how easy it is to buy meat direct from the producer, but what about all those essentials that even the most determined downsizer finds themselves popping into the supermarket to buy? How can we do without/find alternative sources/cut the cost (cost savings can help fund those products that it really is worth/necessary paying more for). Contributions on both sides (asking and answering) are most welcome...
bagpuss

Its probably the non food items which are more difficult than the food items

So what about

toilet paper
toothpaste
soap (I know you can make your own but not everyone wants to)
washing powder
cleaning fluids
cab

Its probably the non food items which are more difficult than the food items

So what about

toilet paper
toothpaste
soap (I know you can make your own but not everyone wants to)
washing powder
cleaning fluids


Daily Bread, its at our end of town, and its great for nearly all of those. And best of all, when you empty out your cleaning fluid, you can take it back for a refill.

And our toothpaste normally comes from Boots.

The only one of those we get from the supermarket is toilet paper. Dunno why we've never bought that from Daily Bread. Will investimagate...
paul1963

Its probably the non food items which are more difficult than the food items

So what about

toilet paper
toothpaste
soap (I know you can make your own but not everyone wants to)
washing powder
cleaning fluids


Madame Paul's hair dye, sanitary products, elmlea, booze.


Very Happy
bagpuss

Its probably the non food items which are more difficult than the food items

So what about

toilet paper
toothpaste
soap (I know you can make your own but not everyone wants to)
washing powder
cleaning fluids

Daily Bread, its at our end of town, and its great for nearly all of those. And best of all, when you empty out your cleaning fluid, you can take it back for a refill.

And our toothpaste normally comes from Boots.

The only one of those we get from the supermarket is toilet paper. Dunno why we've never bought that from Daily Bread. Will investimagate...

which of course does pose the question is buying from boots better than buying from the supermarkets or is that a debate for another time
cab


which of course does pose the question is buying from boots better than buying from the supermarkets or is that a debate for another time

Dunno. She's absolutely adamant about a particular brand of toothpaste that she's always used, and I know we can't get that in a shop like Daily Bread. So we get that from Boots. Is it more ethical than Tesco or Asda? I would say so, but as you say a matter for another discussion.
bagpuss

what about branded items like Ribena gil

what about branded items like Ribena

in what sense ? whether not to buy them ? Or just not to buy them at a supermarket ?

I've been using the supermarket more for things I don't grow or make myself, because it's easier, and there aren't alternatives locally : tea+coffee, sugar, baking ingredients, etc.

The last time I bulk-bought flour from a sustainable etc supplier, I never used all of it and had to bin it in the end. Wasteful.

I make my own soap; toothpaste, shampoo etc from Boots and various non-supermarket shops;
nats

Its probably the non food items which are more difficult than the food items

So what about

toilet paper
toothpaste
soap (I know you can make your own but not everyone wants to)
washing powder
cleaning fluids

Madame Paul's hair dye, sanitary products, elmlea, booze.


Very Happy

Hair dye I can't help with, but a moon cup, real cream, and wine merchants?! Mind you having said that we'd go broke if we bought beer and cider from wine merchants....
bagpuss

what about branded items like Ribena

in what sense ? whether not to buy them ? Or just not to buy them at a supermarket ?

where to buy them which is not a supermarket or are there some things that we have to accept that we buy for supermarkets as I severly doubt my ability to wean my husband off Ribena
shopgirlsue

Every so often I attempt a supermarket free shop but I struggle with :-
small quantity of organic meat - I dont have a big freezer so can't buy half a sheep Very Happy all I want each week is a couple of chicken fillets and some mince/sausages
fresh fish - again small quantities are a problem to get online
good quality fresh veg
Fairtrade tea/coffee
tinned pulses in water
wholegrain pasta/flour/rice

The other problem I have is access. The nearest farm shop (which is expensive and not very good) is further than my normal supermarket - Waitrose, the nearest health food shop is the same distance and doesn't do food
bagpuss

Do you have a local butcher? Rob R

Its probably the non food items which are more difficult than the food items

So what about

toilet paper
toothpaste
soap (I know you can make your own but not everyone wants to)
washing powder
cleaning fluids

Madame Paul's hair dye, sanitary products, elmlea, booze.


Very Happy

Hair dye I can't help with, but a moon cup, real cream, and wine merchants?! Mind you having said that we'd go broke if we bought beer and cider from wine merchants....

No, you'd just consume less or brew your own, we only (generally) drink so much because we can afford it, as it's not essential, so cutting down and making it into a treat really improves the value you get from it, I find.
cab

There are other brands of blackcurrant cordial.

And you can, I believe, get ribena from some of the ethnic shops down on Mill Road (I think I saw it in Al Amin, an excellent independent grocer).
frewen

When I feel a bit better I'll jot a bit down about food groups - although I'm not running one at the moment... shopgirlsue

Do you have a local butcher?

The butcher is in Shaftesbury but I'ld have to make a separate trip to go there so it doesn't seem sensible from a petrol/pollution point-of view
Rob R

Do you have a local butcher?

And fishmonger?

We get fish from a mobile fishman but you really do have to be a regular customer or he will stop coming because it's not worth his time and diesel coming into the village every week for people who may buy fish from him once a month, which, sadly, is what most other families in the village do - all enthusiastic when they first move into the village and then moan that he doesn't come when, three years later, they decide they want something, NOW. But in any case, all you have to do is ring him, so if there is one in your area, it's worth investigating his/her number. Smile

ETA - same goes for the butcher, it's always worth ringing them even if they don't offer delivery, just to make sure they know there is a demand for the service.
cab

Do you have a local butcher?

The butcher is in Shaftesbury but I'ld have to make a separate trip to go there so it doesn't seem sensible from a petrol/pollution point-of view

If you're going to Shaftesbury, can't you also do the rest of your shopping there rather than at the supermarket? It is presumably only a seperate trip if you're still also going to the supermarket.
bagpuss

There are other brands of blackcurrant cordial.

And you can, I believe, get ribena from some of the ethnic shops down on Mill Road (I think I saw it in Al Amin, an excellent independent grocer).

Do you think he would drink them though!
judith

There are other brands of blackcurrant cordial.

And you can, I believe, get ribena from some of the ethnic shops down on Mill Road (I think I saw it in Al Amin, an excellent independent grocer).

Also easy as pie to make.
In fact probably easier!
Rob R

There are other brands of blackcurrant cordial.

And you can, I believe, get ribena from some of the ethnic shops down on Mill Road (I think I saw it in Al Amin, an excellent independent grocer).

Do you think he would drink them though!

Well if he doesn't then you've cut that expense from your shopping bill. I guess it brings in to question whether GlaxoSmithKline meets with your ethical approval. Addiction is never easy, though.
shopgirlsue

Do you have a local butcher?

The butcher is in Shaftesbury but I'ld have to make a separate trip to go there so it doesn't seem sensible from a petrol/pollution point-of view

If you're going to Shaftesbury, can't you also do the rest of your shopping there rather than at the supermarket? It is presumably only a seperate trip if you're still also going to the supermarket.

No 'cos I can't get anything else in Shaftesbury the health food shop and Waitrose are in another town (which doesn't have a butcher anymore). There is a greengrocer but it's not very good. Sad
cab

There are other brands of blackcurrant cordial.

And you can, I believe, get ribena from some of the ethnic shops down on Mill Road (I think I saw it in Al Amin, an excellent independent grocer).

Do you think he would drink them though!

He has a serious Ribena habit. Its a little un-nerving sometimes. I wonder whether aversion therapy would work? Maybe beat him on the head with a bag of frozen black currants or something?
bagpuss

There are other brands of blackcurrant cordial.

And you can, I believe, get ribena from some of the ethnic shops down on Mill Road (I think I saw it in Al Amin, an excellent independent grocer).

Do you think he would drink them though!

He has a serious Ribena habit. Its a little un-nerving sometimes. I wonder whether aversion therapy would work? Maybe beat him on the head with a bag of frozen black currants or something?

apart from the odd glass of whiskey though it is pretty much the only flavoured drink he consumes
paul1963

Its probably the non food items which are more difficult than the food items

So what about

toilet paper
toothpaste
soap (I know you can make your own but not everyone wants to)
washing powder
cleaning fluids

Madame Paul's hair dye, sanitary products, elmlea, booze.


Very Happy



Hair dye I can't help with, but a moon cup, real cream, and wine merchants?! Mind you having said that we'd go broke if we bought beer and cider from wine merchants....

Thanks Nats, Madame Paul is a mooncup devotee, it was more for the littlun who is just starting the journey (it'd be really nice to be able to find an alternative for her that would evade any peer group pressures into the bargain - I'm still looking).

I used to get wine from my buddy who was manager of threshers and sadly we don't have them any more, I do occasionally use the local shop for wine though. You know, I will ask my farm shop if they get cream (I imagine they can). Very Happy
T.G

I miss the old style individual stores, I like shopping in Glossop it's full of them. It's such a shame that more towns don't have that style of shops.

Around here you have either the towns or nothing, not much of a choice.
alison

Its probably the non food items which are more difficult than the food items

So what about

toilet paper
toothpaste
soap (I know you can make your own but not everyone wants to)
washing powder
cleaning fluids

Daily Bread, its at our end of town, and its great for nearly all of those. And best of all, when you empty out your cleaning fluid, you can take it back for a refill.

And our toothpaste normally comes from Boots.

The only one of those we get from the supermarket is toilet paper. Dunno why we've never bought that from Daily Bread. Will investimagate...

Boots or superdrug would be easy to get from, if not small local pharmasist, like Lloyd the chemist.
alison

Boots do ribena too, I seem to remember. gil

The Co-Op owns one of our local chemists. If that's an anyway better option. Rob R

You know, I will ask my farm shop if they get cream (I imagine they can). Very Happy

After requests on here for raw milk, I have found there are many more small dairies than I ever imagined, so used, are we, to hearing about the big processors. I would be suprised if there isn't a local supply, particularly for pasteurised.
Treacodactyl

Re: Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?

As discussed here there are many reasons we may want to boycott supermarkets and we all know (well, nearly all) how easy it is to buy meat direct from the producer, but what about all those essentials that even the most determined downsizer finds themselves popping into the supermarket to buy? How can we do without/find alternative sources/cut the cost (cost savings can help fund those products that it really is worth/necessary paying more for). Contributions on both sides (asking and answering) are most welcome...

Is it easy to buy direct from the producer? I only eat a small amount of meat, don't want to drive large distances and not found delivery companies that reliable so it's much easier picking it up from the supermarket for me.

On the other hand we bought most of our sundries like kitchen towel, loo roll, washing liquid etc direct from Suma - they have their own delivery vehicles and they are very good.

I'm also curious to know why it's better to buy things from chains such as Boots rather than supermarkets such as Waitrose or Co-op.
Duckhead

It is a cost thing though as well, isn't it.

Most folk on here are so well off, (not financially but in a bit of land and some knowledge, or lots of both, or one or the other). I remember a few years ago being told about the poverty trap, in that folk that couldn't afford a car had to shop locally. They had to pay higher prices than those that tootled down to the supermarket. As they had to pay higher prices they couldn't save for a car. Trapped in poverty. Till Asda twigged and put a free bus on.

I think it's a bit lofty to think that everyone can shun the supermarkets to be honest.
Nell Merionwen

It is a cost thing though as well, isn't it.

Most folk on here are so well off, (not financially but in a bit of land and some knowledge, or lots of both, or one or the other). I remember a few years ago being told about the poverty trap, in that folk that couldn't afford a car had to shop locally. They had to pay higher prices than those that tootled down to the supermarket. As they had to pay higher prices they couldn't save for a car. Trapped in poverty. Till Asda twigged and put a free bus on.

I think it's a bit lofty to think that everyone can shun the supermarkets to be honest.

and we worked so hard to get rid of truck system Wink
Mrs R

I think it's lazy to revert to the the cost thing time and time again without evidence (not just picking on you here sfolati, more the media and those people they always interview bemoaning how poor they are and they can only afford tesco). Since becoming astonishingly poor, I've learnt to avoid supermarkets like the plague even better than when it was purely for ethical reasons and I could still just about afford them! It's pretty much only biscuits and breakfast cereal that they are any good on when it comes to price. And I put the poverty trap far more down to them than anything else - they seem to be masters at that.... Duckhead

Don't understand. Sorry. ETA @Nell Nell Merionwen

Don't understand. Sorry.

me?
truck system

we fought long and hard to have the right to purchase good quality goods at reasonable prices. To have the opportunity to shop how and where we like.
Seems we have taken a step backwards and put all our eggs in one basket by relying on supermarkets.
The truck system lead to several very good consumer laws being passed not to mention employment laws. Things like branding and the co-operative grew from it's ashes...
cab


I think it's a bit lofty to think that everyone can shun the supermarkets to be honest.

Ideals and aspirations can be lofty. There isn't anything wrong with that.
Duckhead


I think it's a bit lofty to think that everyone can shun the supermarkets to be honest.

Ideals and aspirations can be lofty. There isn't anything wrong with that.

I fully agree. I wasn't really talking about me, more about some poor sod living on the 14th floor in Hull, or anywhere. What can they do to avoid supermarkets?
Mrs R

I'm not really seeing what makes them any different to the rest of us? Confused Rob R

I think it's a bit lofty to think that everyone can shun the supermarkets to be honest.

This thread was intended for people who want to, and is aiming to find practical solutions for helping them, it is not intending to convert people who don't want to, as that's like pushing water up a hill and just leads to arguments.
Duckhead

I'm not really seeing what makes them any different to the rest of us? Confused

The fact that you live on a blooming great farm does give you a few more options than someone in a flat.
For example you aren't killing the Turkeys just yet as Robs dad has that covered.
You have been great to me since I joined here and I respect and admire the pair of you but come on. It's not just a bit different, living in a flat is a world away from your life, as are the options.
cab


I fully agree. I wasn't really talking about me, more about some poor sod living on the 14th floor in Hull, or anywhere. What can they do to avoid supermarkets?

Hull? There are some cracking little shops in Hull, and they're not more expensive than the supermarkets. Same goes for a lot of places. Thats the point of this thread, its about trying to find alternatives.
cab


The fact that you live on a blooming great farm does give you a few more options than someone in a flat.
For example you aren't killing the Turkeys just yet as Robs dad has that covered.
You have been great to me since I joined here and I respect and admire the pair of you but come on. It's not just a bit different, living in a flat is a world away from your life, as are the options.

You're right. But still, its worth a bash.
baldybloke

Its probably the non food items which are more difficult than the food items

So what about

toilet paper
toothpaste
soap (I know you can make your own but not everyone wants to)
washing powder
cleaning fluids

Madame Paul's hair dye, sanitary products, elmlea, booze.

A problem I don't have to worry about. Wash, polish and go!!


Very Happy Jamanda

Hmm. If you live in a city you generally have more shopping options than living in a field in the middle of no-where. Nat and Rob might be OK for meat, but they still need veg and bog roll. Mrs R

I'm not really seeing what makes them any different to the rest of us? Confused

The fact that you live on a blooming great farm does give you a few more options than someone in a flat.

I didn't just sprout out of the ground here you know Laughing I grew up dirt poor in two bed terrace in a northern hill town; had no contact with farming beyond days out in the countryside. I went on to uni in salford, and then began work in the city centre of manchester as a building manager. I was then more or less out of work for 18 months and didn't qualify for benefits at any point, living in the bumhole of lincolnshire - gainsborough. Throughout, I ate well - I have never been poorer than at Rosewood, but all it's taught me is how crap supermarkets are for anyone on a real budget.

We have to buy our meat from the business. Not poultry, they are my hobby right now, but I obviously pay their upkeep and I'm using this time to try to put poultry on the rosewood menu, so it'll be available at the same sensible rate the rets of our meat is.
Katieowl

Bog roll is a decadent western luxury Wink ...many people live without it dontknow

I know someone on the internet (not DS'rs) who have opted to give up TP, both she and her OH do so, they have a bucket with wash clothes (flannels I guess we call them - americanisms are catching) but it's just the two of them, no kids. They have 'health issues' and they find this option better. And moneysaving....

Kate
bernie-woman

We struggle with getting stuff like loo roll, coffee etc.. from anywhere other than a supermarket - we have an excellent butcher but can't get free range gammon or bacon from him so get those from the supermarket too Very Happy marigold

I'm quite happy to shop at supermarkets, but apart from own-brand stuff I can't think of anything they sell that can't be bought from a non-supermarket shop if you look around. Bog roll costs a fortune at the local corner shop, but the choice is there. Rob R

Hmm. If you live in a city you generally have more shopping options than living in a field in the middle of no-where. Nat and Rob might be OK for meat, but they still need veg and bog roll.

Yeah, I've tried wiping my bum on a slice of ham but it just doesn't cut the mustard.
Nell Merionwen

Hmm. If you live in a city you generally have more shopping options than living in a field in the middle of no-where. Nat and Rob might be OK for meat, but they still need veg and bog roll.

Yeah, I've tried wiping my bum on a slice of ham but it just doesn't cut the mustard.

are we going to sink back into the world of swan's necks?
Rob R

Re: Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?

As discussed here there are many reasons we may want to boycott supermarkets and we all know (well, nearly all) how easy it is to buy meat direct from the producer, but what about all those essentials that even the most determined downsizer finds themselves popping into the supermarket to buy? How can we do without/find alternative sources/cut the cost (cost savings can help fund those products that it really is worth/necessary paying more for). Contributions on both sides (asking and answering) are most welcome...

Is it easy to buy direct from the producer? I only eat a small amount of meat, don't want to drive large distances and not found delivery companies that reliable so it's much easier picking it up from the supermarket for me.

Yes, in the sense that you only have to look on the internet and there are loads of producers willing to sell you some, whereas branded goods give you fewer options for sourcing them.

We buy toilet rolls in bulk from a wholesaler too but we have exactly the same issue of storage for buying in quantity as you do for meat. But this thread is for practical solutions for people who want to avoid supermarkets, not people who are fine with them or debating the underlying issues, else I wouldn't have bothered starting a new thread.
Katieowl

Re: Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?

We buy toilet rolls in bulk from a wholesaler too but we have exactly the same issue of storage for buying in quantity as you do for meat. But this thread is for practical solutions for people who want to avoid supermarkets, not people who are fine with them or debating the underlying issues, else I wouldn't have bothered starting a new thread.

So where do you buy them from Rob? Do they work out cheaper?
I've never had much joy with finding a cheap supplier of loo roll other than the supermarket.

I'd be happy to buy most stuff bulk TBH if it bought the price down.

Kate
Rob R

Booker, and yes very much cheaper, particularly if you factor in the fuel and time cost of going to a shop. Katieowl

Mind you it just occurred to me, that me looking for a bulk supplier of X Y or Z doesn't really keep small independant high street shops going either does it Rolling Eyes

Kate
Duckhead

Re: Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?


But this thread is for practical solutions for people who want to avoid supermarkets, not people who are fine with them or debating the underlying issues, else I wouldn't have bothered starting a new thread.

Sorry, that'll be me getting it wrong again, clueless at times Laughing

Bringing back the barter system would help a lot.
Rob R

It does for me because the savings I make in one area are recycled in other products from the local Deli, butchers, post office and garage. If I was buying toilet rolls at the Spar I wouldn't be able to afford other 'luxuries' (including meat).

Edit: in response to Katieowl.
Treacodactyl

Re: Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?

As discussed here there are many reasons we may want to boycott supermarkets and we all know (well, nearly all) how easy it is to buy meat direct from the producer, but what about all those essentials that even the most determined downsizer finds themselves popping into the supermarket to buy? How can we do without/find alternative sources/cut the cost (cost savings can help fund those products that it really is worth/necessary paying more for). Contributions on both sides (asking and answering) are most welcome...

Is it easy to buy direct from the producer? I only eat a small amount of meat, don't want to drive large distances and not found delivery companies that reliable so it's much easier picking it up from the supermarket for me.

Yes, in the sense that you only have to look on the internet and there are loads of producers willing to sell you some, whereas branded goods give you fewer options for sourcing them.

We buy toilet rolls in bulk from a wholesaler too but we have exactly the same issue of storage for buying in quantity as you do for meat. But this thread is for practical solutions for people who want to avoid supermarkets, not people who are fine with them or debating the underlying issues, else I wouldn't have bothered starting a new thread.

If you have the same issues with toilet roll than bulk meat then I suggest you stop keeping it in the freezer. Confused

I'd also like practical suggestions for buying small quantities of meat where you don't have a local butcher and direct delivery isn't suitable for various reasons.
Rob R

Re: Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?

Bringing back the barter system would help a lot.

That's one thing I do like about small shops - they'll knock a few pence off if you haven't got enough money, whereas supermarkets make you put something back. Laughing
Rob R

Re: Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?

If you have the same issues with toilet roll than bulk meat then I suggest you stop keeping it in the freezer. Confused

Rolling Eyes
Katieowl

Good Point Rob.

All my nearby Bookers are an hour away, but I had intended to check them out anyway. I did gather together some paperwork from OH's business to join, as I don't have stuff for the B&B yet, but never happened Rolling Eyes

My current best buy is 9 rolls for 1.99 from Aldi. They are good quality and tightly rolled. Which ones do you get from Booker? the 40's or the 24's?

Kate
Duckhead

Re: Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?

Bringing back the barter system would help a lot.

That's one thing I do like about small shops - they'll knock a few pence off if you haven't got enough money, whereas supermarkets make you put something back. Laughing

We have Lidl here, I think its more an Italian thing than policy but they don't bother with coppers. If I'm 4 cents short they don't care, if they can't give me 4 cents change they don't care either. Laughing I do like this country.
Rob R

Good Point Rob.

All my nearby Bookers are an hour away, but I had intended to check them out anyway. I did gather together some paperwork from OH's business to join, as I don't have stuff for the B&B yet, but never happened Rolling Eyes

My current best buy is 9 rolls for 1.99 from Aldi. They are good quality and tightly rolled. Which ones do you get from Booker? the 40's or the 24's?

Kate

The 12 x 4 ones, they work out at about 12p a roll.

Booker is the other side of York to us, so we try to either combine it with a hospital trip or other such errands, and we go up to about six times a year. Though I must add, we don't get toilet rolls every time! Laughing
judith

Re: Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?

I'd also like practical suggestions for buying small quantities of meat where you don't have a local butcher and direct delivery isn't suitable for various reasons.

Keep looking around.
There are two garden centres near me with shops attached that do very good meat. The little Spar supermarkets also seem to have a policy of selling locally-sourced produce, with quite an impressive meat selection. There is a garage with shop attached on the way to Shrewsbury with an impressive deli meat selection from local producers and a fine range of beers. And there are others - there must be some similar shops near you.
cab

Re: Avoiding supermarkets; what are the alternatives?


If you have the same issues with toilet roll than bulk meat then I suggest you stop keeping it in the freezer. Confused


You say that now, but you've never had my chilli.
Rob R

Laughing Laughing Rob R

As far as farm shops go, I keep discovering new farm shops in the area - we went for a meal at one a few months ago and I'd driven past loads of times but never noticed it. Embarassed

And we happened upon Roots Farm Shop near Northallerton while out delivering pigs one day, just from seeing a direction sign at the side of the road - that was a lucky find.
T.G

You'd imagine we'd have more farm shops than we do. The ones we do have seem to be very much higher than the high street let alone the supermarkets and seem to aim for the tourist element - the farmers markets are avoided like the plague by locals for that very reason, prices rocket over the summer tourist season.

I don't mind paying a fair price for a fair product but I do mind someone having my pants down over the price of a cabbage Rolling Eyes
Chez

I don't mind paying a fair price for a fair product but I do mind someone having my pants down over the price of a cabbage Rolling Eyes

Please can I swipe that as my new sig? Laughing
Jamanda

Must admit, I'm rarely very impressed with "farm shops" or "farmer's markets". They seem to be overpriced and poor quality for the main part.

The pannier markets some of the towns have here are better, but generally, the butchers and the greengrocers seem to be best.

I have tried Suma for bog roll etc - but the bulk quantities make it a pain.

So for now I'll stick to the local shops for 90% of stuff and use the supermarkets for the odds and ends.
Bernie66

cabbage aint cheap up my way, think it's a reasonable offer myself Wink

We don't pay enough for our food, well not usually............
T.G

I don't mind paying a fair price for a fair product but I do mind someone having my pants down over the price of a cabbage Rolling Eyes

Please can I swipe that as my new sig? Laughing

feel free Smile
Duckhead


I don't mind paying a fair price for a fair product but I do mind someone having my pants down over the price of a cabbage Rolling Eyes
That reminds me of the time when my wife jokingly said to a farming type bloke... " do you take credit cards?" he said yes.. as long as I can swipe your ar8e
Rob R

I prefer "I'll take it, but you won't get it back". lassemista

Re small quantities of meat-
Do you have any like minded friends who you could split an order with?
On another front, I have recently tried the Elanthy olive oil I came across on here - it is really good, and by buying a number of cans with friends it is cheaper than the supermarket. They give a 10% discount on the first order.
For breadmaking I have bought flour from a local windmill - may be worth the research for others. My main problem is planning well enough ahead, so a rush to Waitrose isn't needed!
Andrea.
Bebo

All my nearby Bookers are an hour away, but I had intended to check them out anyway. I did gather together some paperwork from OH's business to join, as I don't have stuff for the B&B yet, but never happened Rolling Eyes


I'd get stuff in bulk from Bookers, but I don't have a business so I can't join.
sean

You don't need to have much of a business. Wink School PTFAs can get a booker card. Rob R

Or you must have a self-employed friend, or if not start a food group/business. Bebo

Or you must have a self-employed friend, .

I don't have any friends. Laughing
Addiscomber

Hmm. If you live in a city you generally have more shopping options than living in a field in the middle of no-where.
You would think so, but it ain't necessarily so. We have supermarkets galore and a few independent convenience stores, but they sell the same type of goods only at higher prices. Luckily we still have our very good butcher, and a greengrocer, but there are no local producers at all, let alone organic, when for miles in all directions is built up.

Nat and Rob might be OK for meat, but they still need veg and bog roll.
It has always puzzled me as to why fresh veg seems to be hard to get hold of, and expensive, in rural areas, where you would think it would be the opposite.
sean

Because most areas don't grow veg commercially. Round here is/was primarily a dairying area. There's one market garden within striking distance of us. Treacodactyl

Because most areas don't grow veg commercially. Round here is/was primarily a dairying area. There's one market garden within striking distance of us.

Do you think there would be realistic demand in your area for more local grown veg? Either traditional or more exotic?
sean

Yep, definitely as far as I can tell. Chickem works for them so she might be better placed to judge but I reckon there would be a market. Treacodactyl

Re small quantities of meat-
Do you have any like minded friends who you could split an order with?


Not unless we travel a fair bit delivering it which defeats the object really. We've done it with Suma orders, often taking orders from several people but non perishable items are easier to store and get to people.
Rob R

How much is not much (meat)? marigold

Lots of market gardens around here - the local Waitrose and Tesco's flog F&V grown within 10 miles of the stores (in addition to all the imported stuff, of course). I do sometimes wonder if it's driven twice round the country in their packing/distribution network before it gets into the stores, but they've obviously picked up on the marketing potential of local produce. Small shops don't make a big thing of local produce though, so I assume it's mostly warehoused stuff they are selling. OP

When I researched this a few years ago most greengrocers were getting their orchard fruit supplies from wholesale F&V markets, although some supplemented it with locally-grown stuff in season. I recently noticed our local Sainsbury's were selling "local" potatoes, grown about 20 miles away, which I suppose is local, but like marigold I did wonder what actual route they had taken to get here. Still it is probably a good thing. Rob R

Where were they grown? When East Riding Farm Produce was still going they could have come 7 miles, although they were also going as far as spain and also coming up from the fens to be processed. OP

I think it was Middleton on the Wolds, I'll check next time I am there. Treacodactyl

How much is not much (meat)?

On average I think I only eat 200 - 300g of meat a week. I could eat more but I don't tend to have as much as most people.
cab

Because most areas don't grow veg commercially. Round here is/was primarily a dairying area. There's one market garden within striking distance of us.

Whereas here in the Fens getting a great range of locally grown, high quality veg is a doddle, but sourcing dairy produce locally is more of a challenge.
Rob R

What you need is a dairy fairy! Laughing Rob R

How much is not much (meat)?

On average I think I only eat 200 - 300g of meat a week. I could eat more but I don't tend to have as much as most people.

So 5kg would last about five months - I know people who buy that amount in bulk without too much trouble, and they, as a household, eat in excess of that.
Rob R

I think it was Middleton on the Wolds, I'll check next time I am there.

It's difficult to find someone who doesn't grow spuds up your way, and I'm not that familiar with Sainbury's supply chain.
ros

Because most areas don't grow veg commercially. Round here is/was primarily a dairying area. There's one market garden within striking distance of us.

Whereas here in the Fens getting a great range of locally grown, high quality veg is a doddle, but sourcing dairy produce locally is more of a challenge.

milkman delivered butter this am labelled

Dairyfare organic salted butter from
crow hill farm Ravensden Bedford

- can't say I've seen any more local to Cambridge than that recently - but I don't know which side you are.- any good?
cab


- can't say I've seen any more local to Cambridge than that recently - but I don't know which side you are.- any good?

Not bad! I think thats closer than the butter we normally get, which is from Lincolnshire. Most of the ceese we buy is from Hitchin. From here:

http://www.wobblybottomfarm.co.uk/

We get it in the 'farm shop' on Lensfield Road (which is well worth a visit).
Rob R

That is Windmill Foods ros, they buy Jersey milk and are one to be supported IMHO. ros

That is Windmill Foods ros, they buy Jersey milk and are one to be supported IMHO.

ah that makes sense - have yogurt and cream from a similar address that says "windmill" on it - the butter doesn't though.
Rob R

Yeah, it's an on farm dairy and the farm itself has organic holstein/friesans and a few jerseys but the dairy also buys from several farms in the Eastern region. They were recently bought by Freshways though. Here is their website: http://www.windmillfoods.biz/ ros

I love Buy-Local Bedford

Milkman delivers produce in the scheme all year round - with extra goodies at Christmas Very Happy Very Happy


(but I can't afford the meat or poultry from them - Sad so you're still my beef source Very Happy )
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