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Cathryn

Badgers

My bees swarmed while we were away on holiday. Rolling Eyes There were a small number left that I didn't hold out much hope for. I went and checked them yesterday and now there is no hope at all for them.

I think next year I will have to securely fence off an apiary, which is a shame as I had wanted to slowly dot hives all over the farm. Anyway, I have the winter to work out how to keep them secure from what must be over a hundred badgers living on the farm alone.


Bodger

I've seen chicken sheds taken apart in a similar manner. With that many badgers around you, I think that an electric fence is your only hope.

Either a couple of strands at low level or possibly a combination of a wire netting ( two foot for the wire netting is high enough) and the two strands of electric wire.
Poultry electric netting is very greedy and if your bee's are situated away from a socket, then its not really viable.
sean

Bees travel a fair way though. I can't see that keeping them in secure area near the house would be problematic really. Less nice in a vague sort of way but better than being eaten by badgers. IMHO.
Jamanda

Could they go in the walled area next to the house? They'd pollinate the apple trees and you could get a cable to there. If you tucked them in the shelter of the wall on the sea side maybe?
Lorrainelovesplants

We also have a badger problem.
They have tried the beehives previously - we racketstrap them together and the stand is quite substancial and they cant get under it.
They have however, ripped the backs off the small arks we use for young chicken (in the front garden no less). This has happened a couple of times.
Cathryn

Could they go in the walled area next to the house? They'd pollinate the apple trees and you could get a cable to there. If you tucked them in the shelter of the wall on the sea side maybe?


It's just too windy. There are several spots where on nice days, look perfect but when the wind blows as it does so often, they probably couldn't even get out of the hive. That happens on too many days. Someone else in the club tried to keep them in their seaside garden but have now moved them away from there.
Tavascarow

Bummer!
Electric fencing is the answer, or a cheaper method would be to do what they do in Africa.
Suspend the hive from a tree.
A pulley system would make it easy to lower for inspection & harvesting.
In nature a bees natural sites are generally 6 to 10 feet off the ground.
It's only for our convenience that we have them nearer the ground.
Jamanda

You can put a hive in a shed.
Cathryn

Jack has suggested standing it in an old water trough. This sounds simple and straightforward and might just work if it's still accessible to me. I have chance to improve the roof and the way the bars sit on the hive now as well.
Jamanda

Jack has suggested standing it in an old water trough. This sounds simple and straightforward and might just work if it's still accessible to me. I have chance to improve the roof and the way the bars sit on the hive now as well.


Are badgers scared of water?
Cathryn

An old empty one. Smile Theoretically they wouldn't be able to get into a tall one to get at the hive.

Are you test driving your home brew?
Jamanda

An old empty one. Smile Theoretically they wouldn't be able to get into a tall one to get at the hive.

Are you test driving your home brew?

No. I just had this image of your hive with a moat.
Chez

It could have a draw-bridge. Jamanda

The shed thing is serious. In cold Scandinavian places, they put the hives in the sheds, with a little tunnel from the door of the hive to the outside. Cathryn

I wonder if they do swim. One of the ponds has an island... Chez

Every badger is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. Jamanda

I wonder if they do swim. One of the ponds has an island...

All mammals can swim (except some from Appledore.)
Ginkotree

Have seen badgers about the farm..never realised they would rip into a hive...the association hives have a fence around but I think I will suggest to them an electric one...
sorry to see the destruction they have caused...
catbaffler

In my ignorance, I had no idea that badgers would do that.

Coincidentally, it looks as though there might be a lot less of them soon...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2012/sep/16/badger-cull-government-go-ahead?fb=optOut
Tavascarow

Badgers will attack bee colonies, although it's not common.
I've kept bees here for over 25 years & never had a hive raided, & we have a fairly large badger population around us.
I imagine once you have a badger that has got a taste for bees it could be a recurring problem so wise to take precautions.
gardening-girl

Yummersetters oh keeps all his hives in a shed.Means they can be worked on in bad weather,another bonus.
We also have a badger problem, they have taken geese and a couple of broodie hens by pulling the coops to pieces.
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