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Nicky Colour it green

bathroom light switch - inside or outside?

We are in the middle of re-modelling our shower room(technically we are doing the kitchen but it involved a wall shared with the downstairs loo... and yes. well long story)

Annnnyway - as I understand the regulations regarding bathrooms, you can either have the light switch outside the room, or a pull cord switch.

I prefer the switch outside option, it is the arrangement we had when I was growing up - mr Cig thinks it is odd not to have the switch in the room with you.

which do you have? which is the norm?
Rusticwood

Pull cord inside
Jamanda

Switch outside.
Nick

I've known both. Hilarious japes are less common if the switch is inside.
Marionb

When I think of a switch outside I always think of someone pranking the person in the bathroom by switching the light off (when its dark)...
sean

Switch outside.


Yeah, but we're in Devon. Prior to this everywhere I've lived has had a pull cord switch in the bathroom. Light-switches outside the room seems to be a local wiring thing.
Falstaff

Laughing

Inside - I always find it irritating when I visit people and have to ask "where's the light switch ?"
Nicky Colour it green

Switch outside.


Yeah, but we're in Devon. Prior to this everywhere I've lived has had a pull cord switch in the bathroom. Light-switches outside the room seems to be a local wiring thing.

ack

is this going to be one of those things I thought everyone else had and it turns out to be a local thing...... hogs pudding, carnivals, clotted cream, dough cake, red mud and now outside-the-bathroom-light-switches

Mr Cig is from Norfolk. They do things different there.. they don't even have hills....
Nick

High six! dpack

pull cord inside,

apart from pranks deciding it is too dark and reaching out with a wet paw is a bad idea
vegplot

Switch outside. Behemoth

We swing both ways. No preference. Only thing I'd say is try to position The cord outside the arc of the door. 12Bore

Internal PIR. Falstaff

Internal PIR.

That's just Posey ! Laughing Cool
tahir

Internal PIR.

Yup, avoids a lot of shouting at kids
onemanband

Torch / leave door open.
I must remember to buy a new light fitting.
wellington womble

Internal PIR.

Yup, avoids a lot of shouting at kids

You can't read on the loo then.
Mistress Rose

I have seen light switched outside bathrooms in Hampshire, but I prefer a pull cord in the room. No possible risk of deciding you need the light on and reaching round the door with wet hands. tahir

Internal PIR.

Yup, avoids a lot of shouting at kids

You can't read on the loo then.

Yeah just gives it a wave every now an then
Shan

Re: bathroom light switch - inside or outside?

We are in the middle of re-modelling our shower room(technically we are doing the kitchen but it involved a wall shared with the downstairs loo... and yes. well long story)

Annnnyway - as I understand the regulations regarding bathrooms, you can either have the light switch outside the room, or a pull cord switch.

I prefer the switch outside option, it is the arrangement we had when I was growing up - mr Cig thinks it is odd not to have the switch in the room with you.

which do you have? which is the norm?

Switch outside.
sgt.colon

Our switches are outside. Shan

Far more civilised! BahamaMama

inside (control freak) gardening-girl

Inside. never seen anything else. onemanband

Our switches are outside.

Isn't that a bit inconvenient ? Not to mention a bit cold in the winter Laughing
onemanband

New build round here seem to have outside switch for downstairs wc's and pull cord on main bathroom.
Like MR said - you might get out of bath/shower and decide you need light.
Outside switched downstairs wc you can see if light been left off/on without opening door.
sgt.colon

Our switches are outside.

Isn't that a bit inconvenient ? Not to mention a bit cold in the winter Laughing

Laughing Laughing

Indeed but it stops the pranksters. Wink
MornieG

We have a switch outside but also when the bedroom light is switched on a single LV light comes on too in the bathroom which is plenty enough light if you need a visit in the middle of the night in the pitch dark. If you leave the bathroom door open before you go to bed you don't need any other light to find your way along the corridor.

Mo.XX
Cathryn

You could have a pull cord on the inside but place it in the very small gap behind the door and the wall so it is impossible to find when it's dark. Covers all bases then. Rolling Eyes Nicky Colour it green

You could have a pull cord on the inside but place it in the very small gap behind the door and the wall so it is impossible to find when it's dark. Covers all bases then. Rolling Eyes

is that the voice of experience?
Nick

You could have a pull cord on the inside but place it in the very small gap behind the door and the wall so it is impossible to find when it's dark. Covers all bases then. Rolling Eyes

is that the voice of experience?

You can smell the bitter, no?
sean

Seems fair enough to me. Electricity is new-fangled and expensive, you don't want to make it too easy for people to use. Cathryn

Pah! Smile He is being dragged into the New Age.

Anyway I vote for a pull cord in the bathroom. In a nice obvious accessible place. Terribly sophisticated dontcha know.
Shan

I think pull cords are unhygienic! Graham Hyde

Don't know about current wiring reg's but in my day light switches were not allowed in bathrooms. OtleyLad

Don't know about current wiring reg's but in my day light switches were not allowed in bathrooms.

You're right but pull cords are ok.
Woo

we have put the switch outside on our first finished bathroom here.
in our old house we had a mix. the ensuite had an outside the room switch and a shaver light inside. yes there were times it was seen as highly amusing to switch off the light. how I laughed!
the main bathroom had a pull cord and it drove me mad.
I would make a loud clunk every time the children went in, never on leaving Rolling Eyes and it would ricochet off the mirror. (thwang, bash).
when we moved out the cord was grubby too .
all that put me off the whole cord thing. and it didn't really fit in so well with our design. ( for that read didn't give it a thought till it was too late.)
I am considering sensors for the kids rooms. that or a recording of, "FLUSH THE TOILET, WASH YOUR HANDS, TURN THAT LIGHT OUT!" I feel like an ARP warden!
As to the putting the light on with wet hands. not sure that is such a challenge? I usually grab a towel before I do anything else while wet anyway and you could get an outdoor switch if it worried you?
Nick

I think pull cords are unhygienic!

What are you doing with them? Shocked
Graham Hyde

Electrical regs were put together for safety being upgraded regularly.
The problem is not only wet hands but dampness through steam etc and also difference of potential.
There was also restrictions on the placement of sockets in kitchens.
It is wise not to flaunt the regs and no bona fide spark would; It could result in a custodial sentence!
Nicky Colour it green

There is plenty of opportunity for steam, water and wet hands in a kitchen, yet we are allowed normal light and socket switches there.... doesn't make so much sense to me Graham Hyde

There are restrictions in a kitchen as I noted as to the placing of electrical points, switches, sockets, etc.
There are lots of practical guides to the regs if you need a laymans version.
Every certified electrician has to be certified with the latest regulations to continue to work, it was up to the 17th edition at my last update.
The editions are up graded frequently (the colour of the regulation book denoting the sub edition); a new edition is issued when a considerable change is needed.
I was also qualified on commercial gas, that required a bi-annual certification with a 100% score required. When this regulation came in a lot of elderly gas fitters retired as they were not confident taking exams, competent gas fitters but not exam takers.
Electrical certification is a lot easier and an edition upgrade is usually a one day C$G course.
dpack

the dirty cord issue can be solved with a wipe clean terminal.we have a ceramic "shrunken cat" but non whack versions in wood or plastic are available for folk who swing etc.

the regs for bathrooms are partly intended to avoid feet in the water/wet floor and hand on the live (or live in condensation)circuits.

kitchen regs assume you have dry feet and so are to prevent live hand ,tap hand circuits.

the thing that puzzles me about bathroom regs is they allow a socket for shavers or toothbrush charges either of which has the ability to connect the person to the basin/bath Rolling Eyes i know they are low amp fittings but they still pack a punch .
Graham Hyde

Your right Dpack, kitchens rely on distance to isolate from the possible earth fault return path through tap water fittings.
Certified, approved shaver sockets included an isolation transformer so are deemed safe.
My certification is well out of date now so I recommend a check on the current regs for anyone doing electrical upgrades.
dpack

iirc in parts of the uk the building regs(electrical stuff) were partially altered from the basically good 17th ed electrical rules and have now mostly returned to the 17th ed rules.

the building regs and the electrical regs have sometimes conflicted .

the new rules about test certificates are both good and bad ,good as it should prevent bad installations ,bad cos it cant and both diy and cowboy stuff can be installed previously and are not subject to any test unless they are altered or mended.

a full test every few years in order to have a supply from the grid would find all the old and dangeroos stuff.
i have found live and in use stuff that was installed pre ww1 recently and stuff installed recently with at least one life threatening fault per metre run Rolling Eyes
Nicky Colour it green


kitchen regs assume you have dry feet and so are to prevent live hand ,tap hand circuits. .

ah good point.


just for clarity, we have no intention of doing anything other than following the regulations, just pondering which of the options to go for.
Shan

I think pull cords are unhygienic!

What are you doing with them? Shocked

I don't know that everyone else washes their hands!
Nicky Colour it green

I think pull cords are unhygienic!

What are you doing with them? Shocked

I don't know that everyone else washes their hands!

surely the same argument stands for either a light cord or switch?
Shan

I can use my elbow to knock off the light switch. onemanband

I can use my elbow to knock off the light switch.

Can you open and close the door with your elbow ? or hold the stair banister with your elbow ? or answer the phone ? or ............etc... etc
Shan

You would be surprised.
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