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nancyrowina

Can Anyone identify this mushroom?



There are lots of these growing down near the canoe lake, can anyone tell me what they are and if they are edible?
Jamanda

From our foraging guidelines.

If you want help identifying a mushroom, its important to include pictures of the whole mushroom (uprooted and intact), with views of the side, top and underside.

If you can include information on whether the mushroom changes colour when cut or bruised, what kind of trees were around (or what kind of habitat you picked the mushroom in), smell, and a spore print colour (if you had one) then that also helps.

Finally, remember that identifying a mushroom with any degree of certainty when you can't get hold of it is impossible; before eating anything you've found, make sure you cross check your ID with a local expert and/or a good guide book.

Remember, there are old mushroom pickers, and there are bold mushroom pickers, but there are no old, bold mushroom pickers Smile

Lastly, always remember that identifying a sample from a description or even a good picture online is a hard task, and it is impossible to ever do so with absolute certainty. Use your own noggin too and check any suggested ID; be safe when eating wild foods!
nancyrowina

Ok I'll try and get some photo's of them where they are growing too, and I have another pictures of this one from a different angle. It's quite large too should really put something next to it so you can see it in perspective, it's larger than an average mushroom you'd buy at the shop but not like a really big one you'd but for stuffing.



There are pine trees growing near them too if that gives any clues, two women died (or one did not sure if the other one died) of multiple organ failure after eating a really poisonous mushroom on the IOW a couple of years ago so I will be very careful don't worry. They lived in ventnor and apparently picked these mushrooms near the botanical gardens and they were foreign ones, this is in Ryde and they look native though.
Jamanda

Actually looking at the colour where it is marked it might be a yellow stainer as Bubble suggested in another recent thread. Not good for eating.
mochyn

Actually looking at the colour where it is marked it might be a yellow stainer as Bubble suggested in another recent thread. Not good for eating.


That was my thought. I'd leave it alone.
Northern Boy

Actually looking at the colour where it is marked it might be a yellow stainer as Bubble suggested in another recent thread. Not good for eating.


That was my thought. I'd leave it alone.

Thirded - slice it in two and see if the white flesh turns yellow
nancyrowina

It did go yellow after a couple of days though I never sliced it, I'll steer clear of them then. There were pine tree's growing near them if that gives anymore clue? bubble

yellowing cap isn't a pointer on its own for yellow stainers, these pictures are probably not stainers... but,you did very well not to eat them ,and you should never unless you are absolutely sure. This forum is here for general guidelines and cannot be used as a sure guide to consume anything from the wild. Been said before but we'll say it again.
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