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Mrs Fiddlesticks

can you freeze porridge?

No not a silly question -just can't find it in my books anywhere. Tim usually buys a breakfast in London when he gets in to work. I was wondering if I could bulk cook some porridge, freeze in small containers and he could then bung it in the microwave once he got to the office - take away porridge sells in small cafes in London for 1.50 or more.. Shocked
Silas

Yep. No problem, done it loads of times, just microwave it to defrost and then heat as normal.

I'm the only one in our hose that eats it and it is hardly worth making it for one, so I do a potful and freeze individual portions, cant tell the frozen from the fresh.
lilacmouse

Dont know the answer to that ...but its got me thinking
you can freeze milk and i've frozen bakes with oats in the topping before now......logically I'd say yes u can ....it would certainly be worth a try Smile
hedgewitch

Was going to say the only problem I've ever had freezing then microwaving grains is a tendency for some to go a bit gloopy (bulgar wheat does this), but porridge shouldn't be affected Very Happy
Silas

When cooking casseroles Curry's, chillies etc, I always cook more than we can eat and freeze the rest in individual portions. There is always a good meal in the freezer at anytime then just in case. I often have to eat on my own and believe me, a home made one of the above is miles better than beans on toast and is just as quick to prepare.
Bernie66

And chilli or curry tastes so much better second time of heating. Can't explain why, it just does.
Silas

Yes, I agree there, goulash is fantastic second time around!
wellington womble

You can bung porridge in a thermos, and it cooks overnight - I added just a little bit more hot milk in the morning, and then used to eat it on the train.
Gervase

Apropos nothing in particular, if you make a topless fez, put a paper plate inside it full of porridge, put it on your head and then delve into it with a spoon while pulling strange expressions, you can fool drunk people into thinking you're eating your own brain.

I'm sorry, this is maybe not the thread...
Bernie66

Gervase wrote:
Apropos nothing in particular, if you make a topless fez, put a paper plate inside it full of porridge, put it on your head and then delve into it with a spoon while pulling strange expressions, you can fool drunk people into thinking you're eating your own brain.

I'm sorry, this is maybe not the thread...


You do need help
madmonk

He's from Crouch End Sad Sad
Gervase

On second thoughts, maybe that one should have been posted on the "...what did you do as a teenager?" thread.
On a similar vein, porridge and kippers don't really work in Jiffy bags. If you're sending any sort of breakfast through the post, it really has to be pretty dry.
Don't ask, but it was done once...
Gervase

...but the breakfast was posted to New Barnet, so I'm excused.
moongoddess

If he has a microwave at work, can he just keep some oats at work and make it in the mornings? Saves you the hassle of making and freezing................

mg x
gil

Would you not just pour it into your porridge drawer, leave it to cool, and cut him a slice to take to work every morning ? Not sure if this is some Ivor Cutler-induced dream, or for real...
cab

I would be tempted to keep oats and dried milk at work; if theres a facility for heating it, theres a facility for making it, and that'll be nearly as quick if its a microwave.
otatop

madmonk wrote:
He's from Crouch End Sad Sad


Crouch End in north London? So what's wrong with Crouch End? Apart from that dead people live there - but I'm sure they're very nice.
Sarah D

gil wrote:
Would you not just pour it into your porridge drawer, leave it to cool, and cut him a slice to take to work every morning ? Not sure if this is some Ivor Cutler-induced dream, or for real...


Certainly not some Ivor Cutler-induced dream, nice though, the thought is!
My grandparents and great grandparents did this, and those that went before them. One of the smaller drawers in the top of a wooden chest was the porridge drawer, kept good and clean, and extra porridge cooked (water and salt only, mind) and poured into the drawer, left to set. Cut into squares, wrapped in a clean cloot and put in the pocket for "elevenses"; my grandpa was a gardener, and ate his in his break, my great grandfather a shepherd, so took his out on the hill. Scottish persons of a certain age will know of the "play piece" taken to school - this is where it originated, a piece of porridge taken into school to be eaten at playtime.
Oats for the porridge making, also flour, were purchased only every 6 months, and kept in a pine kist (chest).
Nice to see Ivor mentioned, more power to your spirtle.
I'm off again now, don't worry.
Pilsbury

Bernie66 wrote:
And chilli or curry tastes so much better second time of heating. Can't explain why, it just does.


I think this is because the flavors have had time to mix and mellow together and it is just a more compleate dish. I find most things are better second time around, chilli, curry, stews most things really.
otatop

'Course you can. I make Indian "rice pudding" whenever I have an excess of milk - and that freezes excellently.
Mrs Fiddlesticks

some interesting ideas there, thanx guys. The porridge drawer amused, shall I incorporate that in to my new kitchen, I wonder. Did think about the thermos idea, but I'd thought I'd have to make it myself in the morning and then pour it hot in to a thermos to keep warm for the journey ( it takes Tim 2 hours to get to work each day) but neither of us are especially bright in the morning. Like the idea of him having dried ingredients and doing his own once there, can sort him out with that lot certainly.
sally_in_wales

I usually keep porridge at work, its a doddle to sling together if he has access to a microwave, send him in with a little tub of raisins or jam in case he fances a flavour some days, otherwise he's as well to just sort it there
wellington womble

I used to do that at work, and then I started bringing stuff to sandwiches and bits and pieces, and before you know it, all your filing cabinets are full of food!
madmonk

otatop wrote:
madmonk wrote:
He's from Crouch End Sad Sad


Crouch End in north London? So what's wrong with Crouch End? Apart from that dead people live there - but I'm sure they're very nice.

What part of North London are you from?
Mrs Fiddlesticks

wellington womble wrote:
I used to do that at work, and then I started bringing stuff to sandwiches and bits and pieces, and before you know it, all your filing cabinets are full of food!

Laughing wonderful vision that conjuers up! Much better use of filing cabinets than having silly paper in them - this attitude may explain why I'm not a corporate person..
Nanny

ok call me stupid but if you tip your porridge into a drawer, whay doesn't it run all through the joints and stick everything together?

can't get my head round it

sorry
gil

Nanny wrote:
ok call me stupid but if you tip your porridge into a drawer, whay doesn't it run all through the joints and stick everything together?


I'm guessing the answer is either

a) it does
b) proper dovetail joints like wot they used to make
c) the porridge is already cooling down and part set before you pour it

If you think that's strange, why not check out Ivor Cutler's books, 'Scenes from A Scotch Sitting Room' Smile
Mrs Fiddlesticks

or d) its lined with lead? - sorry I'll get me coat....
Nanny

i would assume that the drawer must be lined with something...in this day and age you could use cling film or something

lead maybe as you say
Sarah D

Proper porridge shouldn't run anywhere............
Nanny

Sarah D wrote:
Proper porridge shouldn't run anywhere............


agreed!
Gervase

Aye, proper porridge is rather nice cut into squares and fried in butter or bacon fat.
judith

Gervase wrote:
Aye, proper porridge is rather nice cut into squares and fried in butter or bacon fat.


But then so are most things.
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