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ferox

Catch your own - Lobster, Crab,Langoustine, Prawn, Crayfish

Collapsable traps, many sizes, fold flat, simple and VERY efficient

Suggest you take a peek at www.interextrading.com - active site, scroll around and click on numbered pictures for full info. Prices are on the site too. Good hunting
joker

Who thinks there should be a discount for downsizer members Twisted Evil
Jonnyboy

They seem like good value but i still havent found out if they need additional weighting.
joker

Hve you tried ringing them Question
mochyn

My dad put some new pots in the water the other day, unbaited, just to get them smelling right. When he pulled them up the next day to bait them: 8 lobsters!
ButteryHOLsomeness

i've always wondered about the legality of using lobster pots

having lived on skye for a few years i can tell you that the fisherman are VERY picky about people infringing on what they see as their waters

can you use them if you have sea frontage on your land?
mochyn

Are you following me?! My old chap lives in Ireland, and a couple of other people put pots out in the bay where he lives, but no-one seems to mind. It's only done by locals though, not visitors.
sean

I don't think that there are legal issues, as far as I remember. More the finding your pots aren't there any more/getting thumped if you throw them on someone's patch issues.
ButteryHOLsomeness

but how do you know if it's someone elses patch?

also, how far out fromyour own land are you allowed to place the pots?

i'd love to be able to do this myself someday, i love lobster and crab mmmmm
dougal

ButteryHOLsomeness wrote:
.. how far out fromyour own land are you allowed to place the pots?

I don't think you have any (legal property or fishery) rights below the high tide line. Beyond that it belongs to the Crown, as far out as territorial rights are claimed...
callas

Living by the sea I am quite interested in adding fish to my diet for free. But I am unsure how I actually catch lobsters. What do I do with my pot? Can I walk out at low tide throw the pot in and then come back at the next low tide?

Last winter while walking the dog I found a large live lobster on the beach couldn't believe it - but my husband made me throw it back in saying it was a sick one. I have asked the local fisherman and he says they do sometimes come ashore when its very cold and it would have been fine to eat. But he is not very forthcoming on giving me advice on catching my own.
Behemoth

dougal wrote:
ButteryHOLsomeness wrote:
.. how far out fromyour own land are you allowed to place the pots?

I don't think you have any (legal property or fishery) rights below the high tide line. Beyond that it belongs to the Crown, as far out as territorial rights are claimed...


which is why all dead whales that get washed up belong to the queen.
mochyn

dougal wrote:
I don't think you have any (legal property or fishery) rights below the high tide line. Beyond that it belongs to the Crown, as far out as territorial rights are claimed...


Not in Ireland, it doesn't! Not any more! I don't think legal issues have aver been raised. And the beach doesn't join onto our land, anyway. Each person has the buoys to the pots marked with a different colour and puts them in the same place each time.

He goes out in a small boat to put them out: I don't think the tide goes low enough. Other than that, it's dead easy!
Lloyd

It's a bit like the people on the south and other coasts who shoot large seafowl on the sands...as long as its below the high water mark. Odd to think that seaside tourist resorts can have people banging away on them quite legally, unless local byelaws prohibit.
dpack

lobsters

not to be taken lightly they are old and wise also of money value trade for them
dpack

lobster

or find lobster mark bait pot secure pot wait return to check pot get lobster or not repeat process try not to get drowned or need to be rescued if it was easy ...... well we would all do it
footprints

lobsters

I used to have shares in a small fishing boat with my Father. We used to net and pot in the Menai Straights for lobster /bass/mullet etc, and would very often catch more lobsters in nets than in pots.

Towards the end of the year when the salmon were running, we would bait the pots with whole sides of large salmon. During this time of the year you could not avoid catching the salmon, but you were not allowed to land them.

We have eaten whole sides of salmon (with your fingers) cooked on a fire on the shore, while we were cleaning and repacking nets
Smile
woodyandluna

Re: lobsters

footprints wrote:

We have eaten whole sides of salmon (with your fingers) cooked on a fire on the shore, while we were cleaning and repacking nets
Smile


That truly is the good life. I envy you!! Smile

Now where's my boat..????
zigs

as a hobby fisherperson, you are only allowed to take 2 lobsters a day, they must be over the minimum size & you cannot take one that has a "v" notch cut in its tail
hils

I am a TOTAL novice with all this, what can you potentially catch from a river which isnt fish? I remember a River Cottage episode catching crayfish - how easy is this. Also the river was haeavily polluted about 3 years ago but I've seen loads of fish in it recently and kingfishers thriving. If I did manage to catch anything to eat would it be safe?
judith

ziggy searchfield wrote:
you cannot take one that has a "v" notch cut in its tail


Another non-fisherperson here. What does the "v" indicate - is it one that is being monitored in a scientific study?
mochyn

If you're after crayfish you can only catch the invasive Signal crayfish: the natives are protected. I'm sure someone here knows more about this than I do, though!
zigs

yeah, the v notch would be a study thing, lobsters live for a very long time, one caught in usa a few years ago had a reprieve from the table when someone realised it was over 50 years old, he is now in an aquarium.

it is illegal to set a trap for cray fish ( even the signal crays ) without a licence from the environment agency. but they are very keen to reduce the numbers of signals so a licence shouldnt be a problem. the signals carry a fungus which is wiping out our native, smaller crayfish, any of these caught should be returned.

isnt mochyn welsh for badger ?
dougal

Crayfish:

There is a fundamental distinction between the endangered and protected native "white-clawed" crayfish and the unwelcome import the Signal Crayfish.

A change in the law came into force on 1st June 2005, so that it became possible for the Environment Agency to actually issue licenses to legally trap crayfish, ie Signals. (Previously that was only possible in the Thames area.)
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/news/1131299

If your area has a problem with Signals, then it shouldn't be a problem getting permission.

If you are fishing for anything else and catch a Signal, it is illegal to return it to the wild. It must be killed.
Crayfish must not be used as bait when fishing.

You need a license to "transport" Crayfish, but there must be an exemption to allow you to take them a short distance home.
You need yet another license to "keep" Crayfish - although there is an exemption if they are for "immediate consumption". There is also a Postcode list where the license to keep is not required - because the area is already infested with Signals... (a good indication of where Signals are to be found!)
http://www.defra.gov.uk/fish/freshwater/pdf/licreq.pdf

Executive summary: contact your local Environment Agency office and they should be very helpful if there is a local Signal problem. But expect them to be very *discouraging* if you have a surviving population of natives...

Note - it may be quite different in Scotland - where "criminal gangs" are deliberately stocking rivers with Signals, so as to harvest them and pass them off in restaurants as "lobster". Well, thats what it says in the paper, anyway
http://thescotsman.scotsman.com/index.cfm?id=1807002005



You should keep the little blighters for a day or two so that any nasties in their gut have time to clear through. However if the water they have been living in is polluted, the animal will have absorbed contaminants into its meat, and there wouldn't be any pleasure, for me, in eating them.
mochyn

Ziggy: mochyn is Welsh for pig: certainly not an insult (we live for the pig, we die for the pig), although badger (broch in Welsh) could be. We have a badger overpopulation problem here, and, as a result, are losing all our ground-nesting birds. They also kill poultry and such. There is one rather lovely little badger who comes into our yard and eats slugs, so they're not all bad, but our poultry run, veg garden and fruit cage are all heavily fortified! All they need is corner gun emplacements.
zigs

ahh, i was told badger was mochyn daer, or earth pig, the broch name would be more in keeping with the old english brock i supose.

badgers used to wreak havock on my field, thought onions were footballs. Rolling Eyes
Cathryn

It is also the nick name (mochyn) of a friend of ours - who is in the police force Laughing
zigs

found this page, may be of interest

http://www.swsfc.org.uk/vnotching.htm
Bodger

Welcom Lugige !
If you live near the coast, you'll no doubt have some monsters to catch !
Jonnyboy

I'm afraid that Lugige is a spambot, don't click on his link.
Bodger

Thanks Jonnyboy !
Lugige
I hope you catch crabs instead Very Happy
Jonnyboy

Very Happy ROFL
madmonk

bodger wrote:
Thanks Jonnyboy !
Lugige
I hope you catch crabs instead Very Happy

Bodger don't beat about the bush, say what tou really mean. Laughing Laughing
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