Archive for Downsizer For an ethical approach to consumption
 


       Downsizer Forum Index -> Grow Your Own
otatop

Devastated!

That's me and my gooseberries. Yesterday I was cheered by what looked to be a promising harvest (after an unusually poor crop last year). This morning I rocked back on my heels at the sight of 2 half naked bushes. I started trying to deal with the attack by squishing, but then I realised that this thing was bigger than me. I'm afraid that at this point I abandoned the organic approach and rushed to the local garden centre. A cautious check just now - zillions of dead green caterpillars under the bushes. I could never have squashed them in a month of Sundays.
I've ordered some nematodes for later treatments. Anyway, questions are:-
Will my bushes survive?
I've checked the leafs of my white and red currants - which seem to be ok, but are they at risk?
What are the chances for the berries on the leaf stripped branches?
dpack

the bushes might survive but i dought you will get a good crop this year

grannie used Bordeaux mix and derris on her gooseberry plantation that aint fluffy even if it counts as "natural".pillars can be a right pita.
Falstaff

Laughing Laughing Gooseberry sawfly - scary innit ? Laughing

Your bushes will be fine, no other plants affected Cool

I've never had them come back - just seem to hit you one year, never to be seen again ! Cool Cool


Edit - They're single brooded, so unless your nematodes keep you won't get to use them - How do you get them to find the Larvae anyway (Strictly speaking they're not caterpillars ) Wink
Treacodactyl

I've never had them come back - just seem to hit you one year, never to be seen again ! Cool Cool


Edit - They're single brooded, so unless your nematodes keep you won't get to use them - How do you get them to find the Larvae anyway (Strictly speaking they're not caterpillars ) Wink


I tend to find they come back year after year. Some species can have three/four broods a year according to the RHS.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=517

I know they pupate in the soil, some people seem to have success with rhubarb leaves covering the ground IIRC.

Bushes should be ok but with reduced vigour next year.
dpack

the Bordeaux mix does help reduce the chance of the chomped bushes getting a secondary hit from fungal or bacterial villains exploiting the chewed bits .
Falstaff




. Some species can have three/four broods a year according to the RHS.

.


I stand corrected ! Cool
onemanband

I've found the same advice given for plum sawfly works - regularly dig around/under the bush to kill the larvae.
Also thin out the middle/bottom of the bush - that's where they like to lay their eggs.
Your plants will survive the attack. Fruit may also survive, but won't be the best.
       Downsizer Forum Index -> Grow Your Own
Page 1 of 1
Home Home Home Home Home