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vegplot

External thread size 10mm compression fitting

Does anyone know what the external thread type and size is for a 10mm compression fitting?

I went to a trade plumbing suppliers this morning and all they could tell me it wasn't 3/8ths,
gregotyn

If it is a standard thread, and they do vary, then change your supplier. I would drive round till I saw a plumber's van parked up and go and ask him as he will most likely to have one on the van! There are variants in pitch of the threads of various screws or whatever has a thread, but I thought that if you have a 10mm item then it will be pretty standard. It is a fact that it is not 3/8ths. You could try a good stock it all type shop, we have 2 such in Welshpool, who if they haven't got it know where there is one!
vegplot

If it is a standard thread, and they do vary, then change your supplier. I would drive round till I saw a plumber's van parked up and go and ask him as he will most likely to have one on the van! There are variants in pitch of the threads of various screws or whatever has a thread, but I thought that if you have a 10mm item then it will be pretty standard. It is a fact that it is not 3/8ths. You could try a good stock it all type shop, we have 2 such in Welshpool, who if they haven't got it know where there is one!


Thanks for your answer.

I have the fitting but I need to know what the external male thread size is, it's not metric as far as I can make out. 10mm is the internal diameter of the fitting.

I need to drill and tap a steel tube that will accept the fitting.
Ty Gwyn

From what i gather,due to visits to plumbing shops etc,all compression fittings are imperial thread,they never changed when the pipework went metric,hence the copper and brass olives for use with old imperial and metric pipework.

Unless you`ve got one of them micrometers for measuring thickness ,i`d try an imperial 1/2 inch nut on that 10mm male fitting to try for size,or better still if you have dies as well as the taps,try one of them on the male fitting for size.
crofter

Are you sure id is 10mm, and not an imperial size?

If it is not 3/8 it might be 1/4?

trial and error!
vegplot

Are you sure id is 10mm, and not an imperial size?

If it is not 3/8 it might be 1/4?

trial and error!


It's a 10mm fitting as used on 10mm central heating systems, you now like 15mm but smaller. The thread is most likely to be a BSP size but I don't want to buy a tap (and die) set only to find it's the wrong one.
onemanband

What about using 10mm steel tube for compression fittings, use a normal straight compression joint and do away with the pipe threading. vegplot

What about using 10mm steel tube for compression fittings, use a normal straight compression joint and do away with the pipe threading.

I still need to tap into the side of a steel vessel which just happens to be a large tube but could just as well be a flat plate. The fitting then screws into the vessel.
onemanband

Tank connector ? I'm guessing not available in 10mm ... so 15mm tank connector, then 15-10 reducer, then your fitting. Assuming aesthetics and rubber washer not a problem. vegplot

Tank connector ? I'm guessing not available in 10mm ... so 15mm tank connector, then 15-10 reducer, then your fitting. Assuming aesthetics and rubber washer not a problem.

No access to inside of tank, it's 4" in diameter hence the need to tap into it from the outside and fit the fitting. This isn't a plumbing job as such.
Ty Gwyn

I`d say your cheapest and best bet is to find either an old plumber or engineer to measure,drill and tap it for you.
If you lived near here there are several in the area.
Hairyloon

At a wild guess, I'd suggest it would be a BSP thread. RichardW

Dont you have a Tig set?

Braze it in.
gregotyn

I understand now what you are saying, if it is for 10mm pipe, but a water pipe, then the thread is almost certainly imperial, I would go down to your local garage man/ one man band type and he would sort it in no time, he will have taps and dies-all our fitters have-and possibly do it for you, as would a plumber on his way home, called cash! Most diy shops should have a thread guage, I carry one at work- it does the lot, in theory! onemanband

I understand now too.
I'd take it to Steve down the road (from me) with the engineering workshop.
vegplot

Sorted. I didn't use the fitting in the end, instead I turned down a piece of brass bar and cut a 10mm thread (for which I have a die) bored a hole then another at 90 degree and solder in a steel tube cut to length. I also modified the mount point to avoid drilling into the oil tank (the back bone of a T120 Triumph Bonneville) and instead plumbed into the timing side case (aluminium alloy), it looks far better than a plumbing fitting would.

Thanks everyone for your ideas.
Ty Gwyn

What year is the Bonnie Vegplot?

Out of interest,was this a modification of your`s,or a repair?
vegplot

What year is the Bonnie Vegplot?

Out of interest,was this a modification of your`s,or a repair?

Built in late 1971 for 1972 but first registered in 1973.

It's a modification to adapt it for positive crankcase ventilation after converting to a Bob Newby primary belt drive and clutch which needs to run dry. The fitting is to provide an alternative port for breathing. It's now fed from the timing side case to a PCV valve from a Yamaha XS650 and then to the outside air.

As it's a parallel twin there is a large displacement in crankcase volume and both pistons rise and fall together. Without adequate breathing crankcase pressure pulses can force oil out through seals. A PCV valve is a one way reed valve that, in theory at least, allows for the creation of low pressure in the crankcase which helps with overall efficiency and helps stop oil being forced out either onto the road or worse into the primary drive.
Ty Gwyn

Nice,one of the last ones before the oil in frame models,

I forget now,was it the XS or the XJS Yamaha 650 that was based on the Bonnie?

Was the belt drive conversion to eliminate the primary chain rattle or eliminate the primary chaincase leaks?

I have a Meriden workshop manual for the 500 and 650cc for 1970,i dare say you have one,if not your welcome for a lend.
vegplot

Nice,one of the last ones before the oil in frame models,

I forget now,was it the XS or the XJS Yamaha 650 that was based on the Bonnie?

Was the belt drive conversion to eliminate the primary chain rattle or eliminate the primary chaincase leaks?

I have a Meriden workshop manual for the 500 and 650cc for 1970,i dare say you have one,if not your welcome for a lend.

It's one of the early oil in frame models.

Belt drive is to eliminate clutch slip and for the other reasons you mention.

I have the manuals but many thanks for the offer.
Hairyloon

Out of interest,was this a modification of your`s,or a repair?
It's a modification...
Are you sure?
As I understand it, you have to inform your insurer about modifications, but you don't have to tell them about repairs...
vegplot

Home made spigot.



Fitted to modified timing case. Too much solder.



PCV valve from Yahamha XS650 fits nice over the old breather port. I need to replace one of the PCV screws with on with a countersunk head to get the unit to sit flush to the casing.

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