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Finsky

Fabric of Britain...

...in BBC 4 start tomorrow at 9pm!! Very Happy FINALLY a program about knitting...and some Fair Isle knitting is shown too..
madcat

Yes I'm going to watch that,may record it for future viewing.
NorthernMonkeyGirl

Oooooooo.

That reminds me I need to finish my little stranded knit lesson so I can pack away the knitting needles.
Rob R

Oh good, let's hope they're using wool, instead of the dreaded acrylic!
Finsky

Oh good, let's hope they're using wool, instead of the dreaded acrylic!

I should think so...it is more of 'documentary program' or 'history of knitting' kind of program...looking forward to see those knitted swimsuits Laughing
Rob R

Oh good, let's hope they're using wool, instead of the dreaded acrylic!

I should think so...it is more of 'documentary program' or 'history of knitting' kind of program...looking forward to see those knitted swimsuits Laughing

Have you seen the clip already? Surprised
NorthernMonkeyGirl

If you managed to spin and knit greasy wool, would it be more waterproof....? Laughing Nicky Colour it green

oh looks interesting Bodger

I'll be off to a cricket meeting, but I have tipped the OH off and she'll be watching it. Very Happy NorthernMonkeyGirl

Just been perusing the John Smedley website, support British manufacturing and all that.
Well, when I have a job.
Lorrainelovesplants

Nice program - watching Kaffe Fassett has put me in the mood again.... Rolling Eyes mochyn

I must try to iPlayer that later. Finsky

Oh...I enjoyed that...what I was able to see... Rolling Eyes
I fell on sleep on front of telly and can't remember seeing anything after the knitted swimsuits 'test'.. Laughing
It is good thing to have Iplayer... Very Happy ...what a trouble it used to be to play with VHS tapes..and remember to set the recorder in right time too. It all sounds like 'donkey's years ago'..
Midland Spinner

Very disappointing.

I know I'm unusual, but to dismiss the whole history of knitting pre 1920s in one sentence and then to patronise anyone who could knit anything more complicated than a garter stitch scarf.
"These patterns are really quite complicated - which shows what level of skill they expected of a simple housewife back then" (or words to that effect. What sort of pattern did she expect to find in a magazine? Something like "Cast on X stitches, turn & work in garter stitch until the work measures Y cm, then cast off - Oh sorry, did I forget to mention that you have to turn the work at the end of each row" Grr
NorthernMonkeyGirl

Very disappointing.

I know I'm unusual, but to dismiss the whole history of knitting pre 1920s in one sentence and then to patronise anyone who could knit anything more complicated than a garter stitch scarf.
"These patterns are really quite complicated - which shows what level of skill they expected of a simple housewife back then" (or words to that effect. What sort of pattern did she expect to find in a magazine? Something like "Cast on X stitches, turn & work in garter stitch until the work measures Y cm, then cast off - Oh sorry, did I forget to mention that you have to turn the work at the end of each row" Grr

I understood it slight;y differently, more as appreciating the level of skill that was widespread and normal, compared to the lack of knowledge around most young women now.
Midland Spinner

Very disappointing.

I know I'm unusual, but to dismiss the whole history of knitting pre 1920s in one sentence and then to patronise anyone who could knit anything more complicated than a garter stitch scarf.
"These patterns are really quite complicated - which shows what level of skill they expected of a simple housewife back then" (or words to that effect. What sort of pattern did she expect to find in a magazine? Something like "Cast on X stitches, turn & work in garter stitch until the work measures Y cm, then cast off - Oh sorry, did I forget to mention that you have to turn the work at the end of each row" Grr

I understood it slight;y differently, more as appreciating the level of skill that was widespread and normal, compared to the lack of knowledge around most young women now.

That's partly because knitting magazines today do publish patterns which aren't far off the one I made up. I saw one once for a 'jacket' made from a rectangle of garter stitch with two buttons. If they always assume the lowest level of skill no-one will ever push themselves.
NorthernMonkeyGirl

Very true. I would assume a beginner and an advanced pattern per issue would be ideal? Midland Spinner

Well the point I was trying to make in my earlier post was that the pattern to which the talking head was referring wasn't all that difficult - none of the so-called 'complicated' stuff they were extolling was tricky. Some of it was in a fine gauge, so would need much more knitting than a chunkier knit, but there was nothing complicated in much of it (the exception being some of the lace samples in the notebook, some of them were quite complicated, but you'd expect that in a sampler). So I stick by my 'patronising' diagnosis. ("oh look at those quaint people in history, they had time to do things, of course, I'm far too important being interviewed for the telly to have time to learn a handicraft but these ladies were quite clever really, despite being in black & white.")

sorry, I'm tired & grumpy and not fit company for nice internet people
NorthernMonkeyGirl

Programme's being repeated Sunday at 8pm on BBC4 Smile sean

Do you not think that Midland Spinner's cross enough about it already? mochyn

Hmm. Just watched it. I'd hoped it might tell me more but I suppose I already know a little bit about the subject Wink Midland Spinner

Do you not think that Midland Spinner's cross enough about it already? Very Happy Embarassed Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing madcat

I realised after watching it that the subject would easily make a whole series. Most tv programmes are very superficial aimed at the general viewer who can have the attention span of a mayfly.
The trouble with us lot is that we are enthusiastic knitters so a much more critical audience.
mochyn

Superficial! That's just the word, Madcat. Nicky Colour it green

I realised after watching it that the subject would easily make a whole series. Most tv programmes are very superficial aimed at the general viewer who can have the attention span of a mayfly.
The trouble with us lot is that we are enthusiastic knitters so a much more critical audience.

yup I enjoyed it but dismayed to discover they planned to cover everything about knitting in one episode - next week is on wallpaper... which I don't spose I shall bother to watch.

I was also annoyed at the suggestion that knitting was sort of invented in the 1920s well you know - fishermen and farmers and labourers wore knitted garments but real people started wearing them in 1920s and so that's when it counts.... Rolling Eyes
Midland Spinner

I realised after watching it that the subject would easily make a whole series. Most tv programmes are very superficial aimed at the general viewer who can have the attention span of a mayfly.
The trouble with us lot is that we are enthusiastic knitters so a much more critical audience.

yup I enjoyed it but dismayed to discover they planned to cover everything about knitting in one episode - next week is on wallpaper... which I don't spose I shall bother to watch.

I was also annoyed at the suggestion that knitting was sort of invented in the 1920s well you know - fishermen and farmers and labourers wore knitted garments but real people started wearing them in 1920s and so that's when it counts.... Rolling Eyes Very Happy Mistress Rose

That does sound rather stupid Midland Spinner. Haven't watched it yet, but perhaps they should have said that 'fashion' re-discovered knitting in the 1920s. As my mother had to learn to knit at school, and must have started in about 1917, I think most 'normal' people were well aware on knitting before that. In Tudor and Stuart times it was very much a luxury product at the high end. Queen Elizabeth I passed laws stopping stocking knitting machines so that the poor could have some means of support, and insisted on hand knitted silk stockings herself.
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