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JB

fruits with seeds on the outside

Arising from a quiz in the lab recently. Are there any fruits other than strawberries which have their seeds on the outside of the fruit's body?
Treacodactyl

Technically strawberries don't have seeds on the outside of the fruit as the red berry bit isn't a fruit.
NorthernMonkeyGirl

Technically strawberries don't have seeds on the outside of the fruit as the red berry bit isn't a fruit.


Rolling Eyes Laughing Laughing

Is the very definition of a fruit something that contains seeds?

In the spirit of the original question, nothing springs to mind immediately
Jamanda

The bit we call the strawberry is a receptacle, which is bit of modified stem. The fruits are actually the little "seeds" which are actually achenes - similar to a little tiny sunflower seed.

And to answer the original question, I cannot think of any others.
Slim

pineapple doesn't have external seeds, but a lot of what we would think of as the fruit towards the middle is also not truly fruit, as with strawberries.
Treacodactyl

I almost said pineapple, although the seeds seem to be just under the surface, but when I googled it I got side tracked with people grwoing them from seed... evil5
dpack

i cant think of any for the reasons above.

perhaps exploding cucumbers count when in mid air Laughing
Mistress Rose

To some extent raspberries, blackberries and all similar variations have the seeds on the outside but in pockets of flesh and juice.
dpack

i dont think b and r berries are technically fruit

iirc the definition of fruit includes "contains seeds" which covers pea pods as well as pears ie if the seeds are on the outside it aint a fruit.

where a fruiting body comes is a whole new can of spores Laughing
Slim

yew "berries" are always an interesting addition to discussions like these. First off, they're from a gymnosperm which by definition has no fruit. Secondly, they wouldn't be a "berry" botanically if the red part was a fruit.

The red bit is a fleshy aril that has evolved to sweeten, soften and turn color similarly to the fleshy receptacle on a strawberry (which is covered in true fruits which each contain a seed)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aril may describe this better than I do
dpack

the flora and mycology seems to know what it is doing i recon it us us dumb humans who try to classify things in a clumsy way that dont

perhaps organ for holding developing reproductive genetic material and enabling it's distribution once developed would cover all of em fruit or not

but help yourself from the " organ for holding developing reproductive genetic material and enabling it's distribution once developed " bowl is a bit awkward to say Laughing
Mistress Rose

The scientific and common usage are rather different anyway, and since you raise the subject of yew trees Slim, trees are just as bad.

If you talk about conifers, there are some, like larch that are deciduous, and others that are berry bearing like yew and juniper. If you classify as hardwoods and softwoods, some deciduous trees are harder than conifers. Does make things difficult. Very Happy
Slim

If you classify as hardwoods and softwoods, some deciduous trees are harder than conifers.


I would say that most are Wink

The "berry" bearing trees are still just bearing naked seeds with modified cone scale however.

These exceptions to the rules are the reason I find plant biology/evolution interesting. For most things in biology we figure out the broad "ground rules" and then we try to figure out how the exceptions to the rules came about. Always interesting to me.

e.g., Monocots don't produce secondary growth - except when they sort of do (palm "trees", etc...)
Nicky Colour it green

cashews? i seem to remember the 'nut' is actually the seed of a fruit and it grows on the outside Tavascarow

cashews? i seem to remember the 'nut' is actually the seed of a fruit and it grows on the outside
I only discovered this recently.
The seed hangs below the fruit.
(Obviously doesn't need to pass through an animals gut to break seed dormancy).
Hairyloon

If you talk about conifers, there are some, like larch that are deciduous...
And then there is alder...
Mistress Rose

Which being awkward is a deciduous tree that seems to have a cone, as you say. dpack

Cyatheales,

umm where do they fit ?

tis a tree but it is a fern

??? Rolling Eyes
dpack

i recon it aint the plants tis the humans that are a bit confused by trying to put the plants into groups. Laughing

i cant decide if fungi are plant or animal or other .

some of the single celled or no celled things are even more difficult to classify

slime moulds ?

is a bundle of rna with or without an unusually configured chemical armour that seems to have no metabolism of it's own,that i know of at any stage of its existence, alive?
in the right circumstances if it can multiply perhaps it is but "it's not life as we know it jim" to quote spock.

those posers are outside the seeds inside or outside question and i dont have an answer for any of them.
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