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billy wiz

How clean quarry tiles

I'm not to sure whether this post should be here.

I have a number of Victorian quarry tiles just basic and plain, they are looking rather dull, is there anything I can clean then with. I don't want a glossy finish, it's that they seem to get dirty quite quickly.


Ta
mochyn

I think the old chap uses VERY VERY DILUTE acid of some kind. I'll have to ask him.
dpack

water soap vinegar for normal cleaning
there used to be a non shiny non slip sealer to wipe on when they are clean
old polish , muck etc may need a chemical stripping
abrasives damage the surface
Jonnyboy

B&Q do cleaners and sealers for quarry tiles. Or at least they did.
Jamanda

Cif (nee Jif) cream (the skightly abrasive stuff) and elbow gease.
Gervase

Dilute oven cleaner works well, as does caustic soda. For a proper job, SPAB recommends cleaners by HG - here.
The Tile & Architectural Ceramics Society conservation guidelines are:
Quote:
Recommended cleaning products are ‘Synperonic A’ and ‘Vulpex’ spirit soap’, available from conservation suppliers, or ‘HG Extra’, ‘HG grease remover’, or ‘BAL Ceramic Floor Tile Cleaner’ available from good tile suppliers.
All products are non ionic, ‘Synperonic A’ is a mild detergent with a balanced ph, ‘Vulpex’ is an alkaline soap, whilst ‘HG Extra (blue label)’ is a stronger detergent which contains phosphoric acid. HG grease remover is an alkaline cleaner and BAL floor tile cleaner contains sulphamic acid.
Whichever product is chosen, the tile should be pre-wetted, the product should be applied neat (with the exception of Vulpex which should be diluted) onto the surface of the tile and agitated manually, left for twenty minutes and then thoroughly rinsed off. The product should not be allowed to dry on the surface of the tile. Each tile should be given individual attention.
To agitate the detergent use ‘Scotchbrite’ green pan scourers. These are made of a plastic material which is abrasive enough to work the liquid into the body of the tile, but will not scratch the surface. Never use wire wool or any hard abrasive material.
Hardened substances which are on the surface of the tile, such as paint splashes may be removed using a ‘Stanley’ blade at a 45 degree angle, red plastic holders which hold the blade thus can be bought from hardware stores.
When the tiles are cleaned, regrouting is often a good idea. Clean new grout will often give the tiles a visual lift, it will also protect the edges of the tiles in areas of heavy tread. Weak cement grout is preferable to lime mortar grout as lime is likely to stain the tiles, however the choice depends on ‘like for like’ with the rest of the building. Rake out by hand all loose grout or dirt from the joints.
Never use bees wax or linseed oil as a protective coating.
Wearing of rubber gloves and eye protection are recommended against the effects of detergent splashes.
Behemoth

I've used HG, does a good job as set out above.
mochyn

Gervase wrote:
Dilute oven cleaner works well, as does caustic soda.


Caustic soda.

That was what I meant. Embarassed
Green Man

After you have cleaned them polish them with a mix of bees wax and linseed oil. Very Happy
Jamanda

Gervase wrote:
Dilute oven cleaner works well, as does caustic soda. For a proper job, SPAB recommends cleaners by HG - here.
The Tile & Architectural Ceramics Society conservation guidelines are:
Quote:
Recommended cleaning products are ‘Synperonic A’ and ‘Vulpex’ spirit soap’, available from conservation suppliers, or ‘HG Extra’, ‘HG grease remover’, or ‘BAL Ceramic Floor Tile Cleaner’ available from good tile suppliers.
All products are non ionic, ‘Synperonic A’ is a mild detergent with a balanced ph, ‘Vulpex’ is an alkaline soap, whilst ‘HG Extra (blue label)’ is a stronger detergent which contains phosphoric acid. HG grease remover is an alkaline cleaner and BAL floor tile cleaner contains sulphamic acid.
Whichever product is chosen, the tile should be pre-wetted, the product should be applied neat (with the exception of Vulpex which should be diluted) onto the surface of the tile and agitated manually, left for twenty minutes and then thoroughly rinsed off. The product should not be allowed to dry on the surface of the tile. Each tile should be given individual attention.
To agitate the detergent use ‘Scotchbrite’ green pan scourers. These are made of a plastic material which is abrasive enough to work the liquid into the body of the tile, but will not scratch the surface. Never use wire wool or any hard abrasive material.
Hardened substances which are on the surface of the tile, such as paint splashes may be removed using a ‘Stanley’ blade at a 45 degree angle, red plastic holders which hold the blade thus can be bought from hardware stores.
When the tiles are cleaned, regrouting is often a good idea. Clean new grout will often give the tiles a visual lift, it will also protect the edges of the tiles in areas of heavy tread. Weak cement grout is preferable to lime mortar grout as lime is likely to stain the tiles, however the choice depends on ‘like for like’ with the rest of the building. Rake out by hand all loose grout or dirt from the joints.
Never use bees wax or linseed oil as a protective coating.
Wearing of rubber gloves and eye protection are recommended against the effects of detergent splashes.


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