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roobarb

How do you clean your dishes (without a dishwasher)

We wash up by hand, and have always used a sponge/scourer type thing to clean the dishes. These work well, but don't seem to last very long - or at least the scourer part of it doesn't. I hate throwing them away as it just adds more plastic to landfill, which we try to avoid. I've just tried the EcoForce recylced sponge/scourer to try and ease my conscience, but these lasted even less time, and I once tried the loafer type thing as a scourer, which were even worse and went mouldy. I'm not a fan of washing up brushes as to me they don't seem to get things as clean. So, what do others use to clean dishes when hand dishwashing?
sean

One of these
dpack

i have used the green scouring pads to good effect,the industrial ones work better than the sponge backed ones

the frayed end of a 16mm trawl rope is quite useful

sand and peat both work

hounds can be very tidy

ps dishwashers are eco friendlyish and cheaper than bowl+detergent+rinse if paying for and heating water (unless you have "free "hot water)

and they cut the time to under 10 mins stacking /unloading per day for 3 or 4 people
NorthernMonkeyGirl

Cheap and nasty sponge/scourer pads.

What also worked was a knitted dishcloth and a loofah for occasional scrubby use, hung up to dry well though.

Salt does well on cast-iron-pan gunk.
wellington womble

You can knit dishcloths out of sisal string, which makes good scrubby things. Ravelry (other knitting websites are available) has loads of patterns for scrubby type things. I knitted exfoliating wash mitts as Thingymas gifts one year, which worked quite well. I don't know if they'd last any longer, but they'd be compostable.
Mistress Rose

I use a dishcloth with a metal scourer for difficult bits. Most things go through the dishwasher, but I always wash pots and baking trays by hand.
LynneA

I have a phobia of foam rubber sponge (can't the stuff), so Howard does the bulk of the washing up.

(That's my story and I'm sticking to it Wink )

Sainsburys used to do these wonderful orange "scouring cloths" but they were discontinued years ago.

I have recently found things called Euro scrubby. More expensive - I found them at Burford Garden Centre, and at the Sarah Raven open day, but they work really well, can be machine washed, and with care, can last for ages.
mochyn

I have a washing up brush which I bought in Oxfam. It's plastic, but has a replaceable head. Very good.
gregotyn

I use the net that comes round citrus fruits as a scrubber. I don't even buy the citrus fruit, I beg the nets from my friends who do! So far there have only been to 2 colours. I am probably just tight, but may even be thrifty!
Mistress Rose

Very Happy
lowri

I think you can't beat really hot water, the hotter the better, but I can see where dpack is coming from.
Tavascarow

A stiff nylon dish brush on the non stick & a stainless wire scourer on everything else.
Slim

Cellulose sponge with a scrubby side, and a small square of chain mail for the rare really nasty cast iron issues

Like this: http://www.amazon.com/Ringer-Stainless-Chainmail-Cleaner-8x6-Inch/dp/B00FKBR1ZG
tahir

i have used the green scouring pads to good effect,the industrial ones work better than the sponge backed ones

the frayed end of a 16mm trawl rope is quite useful

sand and peat both work

hounds can be very tidy

ps dishwashers are eco friendlyish and cheaper than bowl+detergent+rinse if paying for and heating water (unless you have "free "hot water)

and they cut the time to under 10 mins stacking /unloading per day for 3 or 4 people


I thought you'd be using an industrial pressure washer Smile
sean

I reckon he's been out-toughed by Slim using chainmail.
Slim

Finally being recognized as the tough roughneck dishwasher that I am!
dpack

i have used the green scouring pads to good effect,the industrial ones work better than the sponge backed ones

the frayed end of a 16mm trawl rope is quite useful

sand and peat both work

hounds can be very tidy

ps dishwashers are eco friendlyish and cheaper than bowl+detergent+rinse if paying for and heating water (unless you have "free "hot water)

and they cut the time to under 10 mins stacking /unloading per day for 3 or 4 people


I thought you'd be using an industrial pressure washer Smile

actually i have used a pressure washer on burned on pan ming Laughing perfect for oven and grill racks as well Wink
Slim

Anyone ever actually use scouring rushes (AKA horsetails, Equisetum)?

I know they used to be used on pots and pans, but have never actually tried them out myself
NorthernMonkeyGirl

I have! Pretty good, but you need a new stalk for each session as they disintegrate. I couln't decide if they were then safe to compost though? Slim

I have! Pretty good, but you need a new stalk for each session as they disintegrate. I couln't decide if they were then safe to compost though?

Why wouldn't they be?
BahamaMama

I have! Pretty good, but you need a new stalk for each session as they disintegrate. I couln't decide if they were then safe to compost though?

Why wouldn't they be?

Risk of spreading I would guess. Any little living piece will regenerate and then you have to move house.
NorthernMonkeyGirl

I have! Pretty good, but you need a new stalk for each session as they disintegrate. I couln't decide if they were then safe to compost though?

Why wouldn't they be?

Risk of spreading I would guess. Any little living piece will regenerate and then you have to move house.

Precisely.
I guess you could put the bits back on the place you got them?
frewen

wire scourers and knitted dishcloths (dishcloths get boiled once a week). Slim

I have! Pretty good, but you need a new stalk for each session as they disintegrate. I couln't decide if they were then safe to compost though?

Why wouldn't they be?

Risk of spreading I would guess. Any little living piece will regenerate and then you have to move house.

Precisely.
I guess you could put the bits back on the place you got them?

Edit: scratch the below comment, just looked it up and they do have preformed buds in each axil. Definitely best not to chuck in the compost

I think they only spread by spore and by rhizome, so if they're already on the property than the spores are already everywhere, and as long as you're scrubbing with the aerial sections of the plant you should be fine.
Sherbs

We had a dishwasher but it packed in and I haven't bothered to replace it so now wash up by hand. I have been using horrible sponge pads with a scrubby side but I hate having to throw them away all the time. I have already replaced disposable cloths for wiping surfaces and cleaning floors etc with ones made from old towels, dressing gowns etc and I think it's about time I replaced nasty disposable scrubby things too. I shall have to try some of the suggestions here.
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