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How to make your own Environmentally Friendly Washing Powder

Interested in making your own, ecological, washing powder? My mother tried and tested this recipe and swears it is as effective as synthetic powders.

Vote the story up!

http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/246183/How_to_Make_Your_Own_Dirt_Cheap_Eco_friendly_Washing_Powder

Cheers,
Clixy123
cinders

Thank you for info always looking for ways to make things on the cheap

Welcome clixy to the forum hello2
pookie

anyone know a sunlight soap stockist in mid-wales?
marigold

Apparently it's not sold in the UK any more, but you can get it from http://www.portsunlightvillage.com/page.asp?pageid=shop&category=2

There's a thread about making your own washing powder somewhere... search for laundry soap or washing powder.
cinders

I do a similar thing using Oliva Olive Oil Soap 600g 1.80 which chez gave me the idea.Works well
Sarah D

Been making mine for years:

Washing powder

6oz soap flakes
2 cups borax
2 cups washing soda

Mix together and keep in a cool dry place. use a cupful per wash.

Washing up liquid

1/4 cup soap flakes - I used grated homemade soap
Tcups hot water
1/4 cup glycerine
1/2 tsp essential oil of choice eg lemon

Put flakes and hto water intoa bowl, stir to dissolve. Cool to lukewarm.
Stir in glycerine and essential oil and eave to cool. As teh mixture cools it forms a loose gel; stir with a fork to break it up, and, using a funnel, pour into bottle. 2 - 3 tsp per sink of hot water.


The odd crumbly bits left over from home made soap work well too, to save buying flakes.
fenwoman

Re: How to make your own Environmentally Friendly Washing Po

Anonymous wrote:
Interested in making your own, ecological, washing powder? My mother tried and tested this recipe and swears it is as effective as synthetic powders.

Vote the story up!

http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/246183/How_to_Make_Your_Own_Dirt_Cheap_Eco_friendly_Washing_Powder

Cheers,
Clixy123


It isn't powder though it is liquid and as such I cannot use it as I fill my machine, load the powder drawer and leave it on a timer for when the economy 7 clicks on. I wouldn't want a strong concentrated liquid like that leaching neat into my clothes in the drum. Surely I'm not the only person to use a timer and wash on economy7?
James

fenwoman- we use a plastic cup. Rest the cup on top of the load of washing and its fine until the wash begins . This only works if you dont do a pre-wash. {edit- just read the article- six cups!!!??? }

Sarah D
(1) in the washing powder recipe, are the soap flakes also from home made soap (as in the washing up liquid recipe)?
(2) I've only ever seen small quantities of borax- where can I find larger amounts?[/i]
Sarah D

I usually save the scraps of home made soap - the crumbly bits from the edges, broken bars, etc, also the ends of any bought soap we have; dry them well in the airing cupboard and grate finely - use for both the powder and the washing up liquid.

Boots the Chemist sell borax in large-ish boxes, but if you need it in quantity, your chemist should be able to order it in by the kilo for you. I'll have a trawl about later and see if I can find an online supplier in bulk; I'm ready for some more.
Sarah D

http://www.dri-pak.co.uk/mailorder.html

......and look - a whole website about borax!

http://www.borax.com/

Hope these help.
fenwoman

I will certainly give this a try. I wonder if one of those dosing balls you can get with liquid laundry stuff, would work?
What about scum? I personally never use soap and if you leave a bar of soap in water, it goes all scummy. Could one go even further and cut out the soap I wonder? Soap also contains chemicals. So I wonder if it would be posible to make your own soap using whatever the main active ingredients are, then add the borax etc. Borax needs to be used carefully. Once mixed with water it becomes boracic acid. I used this solution to clean 20 years of dirt off my quarry tiles when I moved in here.
I imagine it will rot fabrics quickly too.
I do use a lot of washing soda around the home to wash floors and also place in the washing machine to help soften water and reduce the amount of washing poweder I need.
Of course the really cheap and green washing method is to use one of lakelands plastic's laundry balls. I can highly recommend those, no standing and mixting anything and very economical.
As an example. I use cotton rugs on the floors to mop up the wet muddy pawprints from 14 dogs. The chihuahuas think I put them there to be pissed on so at the end of a day, or the next day, they are not only filthy, but smell disgusting too. Put them in the machine on a 30C wash with a laundry ball and they come out not only perfectly clean but there is zero smell to them. Not even soap powder can do that unless I buy one of the big brand expensive ones with a nasty strong perfume (heave) and do a boil wash.
The laundry balls are flipping brilliant, cost around 7 and my present one is 2 years old. I do at least 4 lloads per week and of late due to the rain, have been doing 2 loads per day to cope with rug, dog bedding, throws etc.
Sarah D

Sorry, but I can't equate green-ness with plastic balls in the washing machine.

I'm not claiming my powder recipe is compeltely green, either, but it suits me and mine. My machine emptioes directly into a butt outside the back door, and the water from that gets used for vegetables, fruit etc in the garden with no problems. Bit of charcoal in the bottom of the butt helps to keep it from getting too smelly, but it does need cleaning our occasionally.
Behemoth

Sarah D wrote:
Sorry, but I can't equate green-ness with plastic balls in the washing machine.


Curious as to why not, aren't they just a delivery method and no different from the washing machine drawer? Confused
Sarah D

This is just my personal observation - plastic (made from oil), probably made abroad and imported (but prepared to be corrected on that one). What happens to them when you've finished with them? Bet you can't recycle them.

That's how I see it.
Behemoth

Don't know, never used them, can anybody with balls check if you can recyle them?
Sarah D

Laughing Laughing Laughing

I am *so* tempted to reply to that how I really want to........... Twisted Evil
tahir

Behemoth wrote:
can anybody with balls check if you can recyle them?


Shocked
Behemoth

What?
fenwoman

Sarah D wrote:
Sorry, but I can't equate green-ness with plastic balls in the washing machine.

I'm not claiming my powder recipe is compeltely green, either, but it suits me and mine. My machine emptioes directly into a butt outside the back door, and the water from that gets used for vegetables, fruit etc in the garden with no problems. Bit of charcoal in the bottom of the butt helps to keep it from getting too smelly, but it does need cleaning our occasionally.


So going back to my original question, how do I dispense it into the machine given that I load the machine up through the day and it comes on automatically after midnight. I don't want a borax solution getting onto my laundry and sitting on one spot until the machine starts letting water in to dilute it some 6 hours later.
My machine simply empties into my cesspit which gets emptied every 5 years or so Smile
Not sure how many water butts I'd have to have to water all of my land lol. Certainly more than could be filled by my washing machine.
fenwoman

Behemoth wrote:
Don't know, never used them, can anybody with balls check if you can recyle them?

you don't throw them away you just keep using them. If plastic is such an issue I'm not sure using a machine at all can be justified if a little ball which gets used for years is a problem and if you don't need it any more I'm sure alternative uses could be found like placing over the top of garden canes to prevent getting eyeball speared when stooping down to check for dog poo on shoe etc.
fenwoman

Behemoth wrote:
Don't know, never used them, can anybody with balls check if you can recyle them?


I understand you can make a good tobacco pouch from them once the contents have been discarded and the rest properly cured hehehe.
Well it has been done before.
http://www.lateralscience.co.uk/oz/morgan/index.html
Behemoth

Filth, the lot of you.


Laughing
James

just checked my ball - its number 5, so yes you can recycle it.
JEAN D

About the wash balls, I believe you can buy the mineral salts that are inside them as refills. I use soapnuts to wash my clothes with, they leave the clothes fresh and towels fluffy, you can even make a shampoo out of them, and they are 100% degradable. www.inasoapnutshell.com
Jean
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