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Green Man

Money saving idea

Market Research :- If you were in a shop to purchase a garment or footwear and at the check-out you got asked if you would like to opt out of your statutory rights for a 10% discount. 1. Would you consider it?
2. Would it be legal?
Obviously you could pay the full price and keep all your rights.

Just considering. I'm getting Trading Standards to call back with their answer, but may take 3 working days.no smilies
Nick

Any attempt to deny statuatory rights is illegal. I imagine this includes attempting to pay people off so you can sell them any old rubbish, which is what your suggestion could lead to.no smilies
Green Man

3 working days!!! The've just phoned back in 5 mins. Nick you are correct they said no. (Turns out he comes into my shop as a customer lol) :oops:no smilies
Green Man

If however the goods were pre-owned but un-used.................?no smilies
Nick

http://whatconsumer.co.uk/second-hand/no smilies
Green Man

Bummer!no smilies
Green Man

Nick either you have thought about this too or you are just a consumer from hell. :wink:no smilies
Nick

Just here to fight against unscrupulous sellers.no smilies
Green Man

Ah..............no smilies
oldish chris

Just here to fight against unscrupulous sellers.
said the consumer from hell. :wink:no smilies
Nick

Nope, the seller with integrity. A good way to beat your competition is to be better and more trustworthy than them. I also have to write and answer contracts, so know my way round them a bit.no smilies
Green Man

I sell good quality goods as I hate the hastle and disapointment of returns, however all the trouble is covered by the margin. I had just thought at this depressed time, if the consumer agreed, the saving could be passed on. I know if I were looking at a good brand say Musto and gave it a good check with my hands and eyes before buying I'd take a 20 discount. But it isnt to be.no smilies
bagpuss

I sell good quality goods as I hate the hastle and disapointment of returns, however all the trouble is covered by the margin. I had just thought at this depressed time, if the consumer agreed, the saving could be passed on. I know if I were looking at a good brand say Musto and gave it a good check with my hands and eyes before buying I'd take a 20 discount. But it isnt to be.


But there are faults that you simply can't spot with your eye that would still shorted the length of the purchased objects lifespan to less than is reasonable which is why these rights are statutory and not negotiable

Even if you buy a piece of clothing cheap knowing it has one flaw you still have your statutory rights if something else goes wrong with itno smilies
Hairyloon

But there are faults that you simply can't spot with your eye that would still shorted the length of the purchased objects lifespan to less than is reasonable which is why these rights are statutory and not negotiable
The joys of the word "reasonable". Is it not reasonable to expect a cheaper item not to last as long?
Is why they get away with making a 5 toaster that only lasts 6 months.
I reckon the idea is onto a loser since so many people are not aware of their statutory rights. All your scheme would do is highlight the fact that they have them.
And if your goods are of appropriate quality, then the amount that are subjected to statutory rights should be negligible.no smilies
bagpuss

But there are faults that you simply can't spot with your eye that would still shorted the length of the purchased objects lifespan to less than is reasonable which is why these rights are statutory and not negotiable
The joys of the word "reasonable". Is it not reasonable to expect a cheaper item not to last as long?
Is why they get away with making a 5 toaster that only lasts 6 months.
I reckon the idea is onto a loser since so many people are not aware of their statutory rights. All your scheme would do is highlight the fact that they have them.
And if your goods are of appropriate quality, then the amount that are subjected to statutory rights should be negligible.

Not if it has been sold as like the more expensive item but for say a missing button or a small bit of damage somewhere like happens with clothes or ex display for electronicsno smilies
Green Man

It isn't going to happen, but the consumer could opt in or out as they pleased. nobody would be loosing their rights. It would have been a gamble, a bit of a thrill. Some peole love saving money, this could have been a way. But hey-ho the days of a seller and buyer being able to barter their own deals are long gone. But the booming black market, that is another story. :roll:no smilies bagpuss

It isn't going to happen, but the consumer could opt in or out as they pleased. nobody would be loosing their rights. It would have been a gamble, a bit of a thrill. Some peole love saving money, this could have been a way. But hey-ho the days of a seller and buyer being able to barter their own deals are long gone. But the booming black market, that is another story. :roll:

You can still barter when making purchased or sales but you can't remove someone's statutory rights as a condition of being able to barterno smilies
Green Man

A seller should be able to offer tailored terms if both parties agree. You can opt for an extended warranty, why not a shortned warranty?no smilies Hairyloon

You can still barter when making purchased or sales but you can't remove someone's statutory rights as a condition of being able to barter
You can reasonably negotiate them downwards.no smilies
Kenworth

Most used goods over here are sold without any warantees. Sold as is, where is. The exception may be with an appliance or auto that someone has worked on to fix something that has wore out. Sometimes a store or seller will offer a short warantee.

Most stores that sell used items have a posted "no returns" policy. Of course, this is a store by store policy.

New items usually fall under written warantees that come with packaging. Many stores selling new goods offer a 30 day money back "guarantee" if an item malfunctions. They simply excange the item.

There are different rules, state by state, when it comes to pets. I'm not too clear on most of them.

What doesn't make sense to me, (fills the government coffers though) is that a sales tax is always collected. This sales tax is collected when an item is new and when it is resold. :x

Sometimes you will see an ad that states that "we'll pay the sales tax for you" in an ad. I am assuming that the seller does pay the sales tax, only raises the prices to cover what the lost revenue may be. This is usually a sepcial however, not an ongoing sale.no smilies
aura

I agree with Kenworth. This is also the position which I have. If you buy something used and second hand, you have no guarantee at all. Maybe some second hand shops have warantees, but definitely not a normal private seller.
In many stores you get a good guarantee, at least you get a coupon back. If you complain a lot there might be a chance to get the money back as well.no smilies
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