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frewen

Neighbour growing ivy up our wall

I didn't realise our neighbour has been growing ivy up our gable wall for years (so they don't have to look out of their patio doors onto a bare brick wall).

Now it's right up to the roof ! So I have asked them to cut it down and he has agreed to weedkill it next weekend.

How soon before I get to see this damn stuff dying? Will it even touch it? The plant must be about 30 feet tall :twisted:no smilies
Nell Merionwen

could he get in at the root and just chop it? I woudl die pretty quickly and then he would just have to treat the root.no smilies
Chez

Isn't ivy one of those things that worms it's way in and sends out little suckers to start sub-plants? I think it's quite hard to get rid of.

(Sorry, Frewen. I'll just go and be the voice of doom over here, quietly)no smilies
frewen

That's ok - it is one reason I am hoping that systemic weedkiller might reach the whole plant?no smilies
Chez

Yes, I would think that would be a good bet. Hang on. I go to google.

ETA: The Divine Alan's forum http://www.alantitchmarsh.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=178no smilies
Nell Merionwen

get in there with a strimmer. My old nextdoor neighbour could kill anything with one :roll:no smilies
Chez

http://www.gardenersclick.com/gardeningquestions/view/how_to_get_rid_of_ivy_once_and_for_allhelllllllllllllllllllllp

And that one.no smilies
frewen

I think the difficulty is going to be getting into his garden regularly enough to deal with this problem :(

and trusting him when he says he's done itno smilies
Nell Merionwen

I think the difficulty is going to be getting into his garden regularly enough to deal with this problem :(

and trusting him when he says he's done it


:cry:no smilies
lottie

We found that killing and getting rid of ivy on the wall of a previous house was easy. The problem was the marks and tiny tags left where it had been clinging to the wall for ages and it was unsightly for years.no smilies
onemanband

Don't know about all this talk of weedkiller.
Weedkiller won't remove it from your wall and it aint neceserely any easier to remove once it's dead.
Tell him to remove it or to pay someone else to do it.
Ladder, some sort of scraper, a mattock and some elbow grease - that's all it needs.
If its Hedera (your common ivy) then it shouldn't damage sound brickwork and will usually pull off in sheets or long pieces.
Then attack base with mattock until ground is well dug over and all roots and cuttings removed. Repeat whenever ivy regrows.
If its Virginia Creeper then that can grip hard - but that aint your problem - unless its got into brick joints.
Make sure he doesn't damage your roof verge or tiles when he removes it.no smilies
Mary-Jane

...get in at the root and just chop it...


That's what I did with the ivy that was strangling the end of one of my barns. Mind you, 'just chop it' didn't work - we had to saw through it which took about an hour :shock:
It worked though - took a while (several weeks from memory) for it to start to shrivel and die away.no smilies
toggle

if it's really well established, cutting the 'trunk' won't kill itno smilies Mary-Jane

if it's really well established, cutting the 'trunk' won't kill it

Perhaps it depends on the species? It worked for me.no smilies
onemanband

IMO he has no legal right to grow ivy up your wall and is thus liable for any damaged caused.
It should be removed from wall. You don't want it rotting on your wall and channelling water into your structure.
If you leave it to die it may be harder to remove once it is brittle rather than when it is live and can be yanked off in large pieces.

Wether you have a legal right to make him dig it up I don't know. IMO he should dig it up so its gone once and for all - brute force, sweat and a mattock - that's all it needs. If he can't do it he should get someone who can.
Obviously depends on ladder access, ground conditions, type of ivy and local labour rates - but that's a 100 -200 job. How much will he spend on weedkiller ? AND he will still need to remove it from your wall.
Forget the weedkiller - remove from wall and dig it up.no smilies
toggle

if he's cooperative about removing it, it may be worth while talking about allowing him to put up trellis to support climbers that won't damage the wall. that will encourage him to make sure the ivy does not grow back.

and M-J, the ivy i was talking about was the standard stuff that grows everywhere, it had been growing for 30+ years though. the bases that were cut through were at least 2 inches diameter.

I'd be tempted to apply a shitload of weedkiller and then physically remove it once it's obvious the weedkiller is in the process of working, then you know you've killed the roots as well.no smilies
lottie


If you leave it to die it may be harder to remove once it is brittle rather than when it is live and can be yanked off in large pieces.



That's what we did wrong, we cut it at the bottom and left it to die but when we came to pull it off it left dried on bits and shreds on the wall that were welded there for years.no smilies
shadiya

What's wrong with Ivy? Looks nice, provides habitat, nectar for bees and a degree of protection from the weather. Give it a trim when it gets out of hand seems perfectly reasonable but nuking it? Your wall but I can't see what there is to be so cross about :shock:no smilies Cathryn

It pulls out mortar and pulls off slates. It is a great plant in it's place though.no smilies mochyn

Biggest problem with ivy on walls is that it gets under gutters and into the roof space.no smilies jema

I liked the idea of Ivy, but have come to view it as a menace.no smilies frewen

I would rather not have a plant that damages the mortar and disrupts the roofing tiles on the whole gable end of my home. I wouldn't dream of planting anything up someone else's property either - not without asking them first!

Two years ago we had to have the first two layers of roofing tiles off and repaired (not due to ivy damage I should add). Health and Safety demanded scaffolding and it was an expensive business. It's not a process I want (or can afford) to repeat.

Fortunately neither does my neighbor and he has cut the ivy and scraped it from the wall. We haven't fallen out and we understand each other far better.

So with a bit of luck that will be the end of it. :)no smilies
Chez

Isn't Virginia Creeper supposed to be okay, though? ie, it's not destructive in the same way?

ETA: good it's sorted, frewen.no smilies
Lorrainelovesplants

No, its actually faster....
It can do 6 ft easy in a season and again ggoes for gutters and eaves...so do montana clematis...
had both on my house in Burnley - nightmare to stop getting into the loft.no smilies
Nicky Colour it green

well done for getting it sorted. you could allow him to fix trellis to your wall and plant something less invasive maybe?no smilies Bebo

It does grow quicker, but its roots don't dig into the mortar and brickwork in the way that ivy does.no smilies NorthernMonkeyGirl

well done for getting it sorted. you could allow him to fix trellis to your wall and plant something less invasive maybe?

That sounds nice :)
What about a clematis? Or a grapevine... *hic* :oops:no smilies
gil

Climbing hydrangea is slower and supposedly non-invasive.no smilies alice

Ditch the green stuff, how about a nice muriel......no smilies Behemoth

No, its actually faster....
It can do 6 ft easy in a season and again ggoes for gutters and eaves...so do montana clematis...
had both on my house in Burnley - nightmare to stop getting into the loft.

Yes when it reaches the top, cut it back and pull it down and replant. It's ok up the brick work but a bugger in the eaves.no smilies
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