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FOD1

New hedging - what to plant?

I've taken out an old Leylandii hedge (it was 20ft high by about 10ft at the base) and am not sure what to plant to replace it with.

The new hedge needs to provide the following in order of importance:
1. Privacy (neighbours are on higher land than us)
2. Fast growing
3. Wildlife friendly
4. Be a native species or mix of species

What do I need to add to the soil before planting the new plants?

Do I need to get the old tree stumps out before replanting - they're about 10"-12" diameter.

Does anyone know of any hedging nurseries in the south west which have mature hedges available to view?

Thank you!
12Bore

You should remove the stumps and add loads of compost/soil improver.
If you can, leave for a year for the ground to recover.
Beech?
Barberry if you want spikes?
Oregon grape?
http://www.ashridgetrees.co.uk Wincanton
FOD1

Thank you. Someone suggested eleagnus ebbingeii - is that any good? Is it faster than beech?
Went

Getting the stumps out is not an easy task but you probably know that already. We disposed of a similar hedge when in the UK and without substantial equipment, they were impossible to move. In the end on one section we drilled holes in the stumps and painted on diesel which worked well and stop further growth. Not the most environmentally friendly solution but it worked well. We raised the soil level and replanted with Holly - within 5 years we had a great evergreen hedge.
Tavascarow

Thank you. Someone suggested eleagnus ebbingeii - is that any good? Is it faster than beech?

Eleagnus is evergreen & some have edible fruit.
I like beech for the way it keeps its russet colours through winter but unless you leave it to turn to a tree you wont get any mast to eat.
I like traditional natives like holly, hawthorn & blackthorn.
Bodger

If there are any, have a look at the local natural hedges and go with whats in them.

We started on our Leylandi last weekend but still have an awful long way to go. We got a mini digger in to take the stumps out of the last lot that we did.

Here are the pictures from last Sunday.

Plenty of sunshine and fresh air for us today.





























Yo Heavo!








Thankfully we managed to get the first and biggest of the row without demolishing the garden shed or the greenhouse. Believe you me, it was close run thing. wink.gif









The first part of the job done. thumbup




Went

Sadly, Leylandii seem to be the hedge of choice in the few new houses that are built here - you can already see them as a potential problem for many.
Bodger

Plenty and I mean plenty, of potential firewood for us in just over twelve months time. thumbup
FOD1

Blimey - yours was worse than ours - nightmare. I was surprised how weedy the petrol chipper we hired was - not really man-enough for the job but I couldn't hire a proper big one without the attached tree surgeon and his invoice.
Chippings piled up for a year before using?

Are you putting in a new hedge?
tonythetree

Beech hedging

Hi I have approx 40 Beech hedging plants 40-60cm you can have if you can pick em up Very Happy They are left over from a planting job
We're in Worcestershire
Tony
FOD1

Hi Tony
I've just PM'd you - thank you
Mutton

For fast growing native - willow. Weave it as a screen as well.
FOD1

The ground needs to be wet for willow doesn't it? My patch is south facing on sandyish soil.
Tavascarow

The ground needs to be wet for willow doesn't it? My patch is south facing on sandyish soil.

They wont survive an extended drought but don't need to be soaking wet either.
If you have got light sandy soil you might have to give them a drink once in a while.
Marches

I'd personally plant Holly or Hornbeam. Mistress Rose

I wouldn't put in willow as it will sucker everywhere and you will end up with a thicket.

It depends on what you want. Hawthorn is generally regarded as being a reliable hedge and is quite quick growing; hence its alternative name of quickthorn.

If you want something less prickly, hazel is good as it can be laid once it has grown to a suitable size, beech will retain its leaves as already posted, hornbeam, or a mixture.
Tavascarow

I wouldn't put in willow as it will sucker everywhere and you will end up with a thicket.

It depends on what you want. Hawthorn is generally regarded as being a reliable hedge and is quite quick growing; hence its alternative name of quickthorn.

If you want something less prickly, hazel is good as it can be laid once it has grown to a suitable size, beech will retain its leaves as already posted, hornbeam, or a mixture. Willow doesn't sucker.
If it is left to grow it will make a moderate tree or if coppiced will form a stool of new shoots but it doesn't spread.
Nicky Colour it green

willow is a good choice - either the kind they use to weave with - or goat willow
you could put some bay in too - but tall and evergreen and useful.
madcat

we did away with an overgrown conifer hedge and left the stumps in ,they don't regrow. Boris piled masses of his homemade compost on the top of the soil between the stumps and we are busy planting small holly and bay and yew seedlings into a new hedge.These are free because they self set in the garden.So far so good but slow because we are just using what we find as self sets in the rest of the garden. dpack

sorry to be grumpy but

get a pro to drop a big tree those snaps look really random and dangeroos

leylandii take a trunk trimming to get light into the under shadow by removing the lower side branches of big uns

starlings really like em

the droppings are ace in a compost heap

etc

all done and no body was killed

please never use a rope like that
dpack

really just dont dpack

caring not criticizing

ive got papers for dropping trees ,there is a reason why one should do it in the right way

i did lots before i got pro training and know how lucky i have been ,tis scary dangeroos when you see one behave badly

a pro would have dropped and snedded that in ten mins .logged in ten .you sort the brash etc

would that have been safer and easier ?

be careful folk ,i want no body to get hurt Wink
dpack

with a ground man doing belay and one up the hedge ones could be trimmed behind ,halved. and the bottom bit taken down to a pullable stump fairly easily and safely by the look but on site conditions trump all

diy is fine but be sensible with stuff that kills folk

sorry to be a spoiler ,sermon over
dpack

it aint a hedge Laughing dpack

i did my first as a kid .poplar 30m +tall and 5 m from house.i did airial dismantling which is a bit pre regulations but it taught me respect for the dangers of such work
.im still alive ,having dropped a lot since i know some of the mistakes and surprises

please be careful with very big things that can kill you ,my last near miss industrial mistake was horrid ,uuugh .we should have got the crane first ,not to pick up the thing that nearly squashed us later

if that had been only slightly worse we would have died rather than just been a bit horrified

i dont want any one to wear a portacabin or a tree
Treacodactyl

I wouldn't put in willow as it will sucker everywhere and you will end up with a thicket.

It depends on what you want. Hawthorn is generally regarded as being a reliable hedge and is quite quick growing; hence its alternative name of quickthorn.

If you want something less prickly, hazel is good as it can be laid once it has grown to a suitable size, beech will retain its leaves as already posted, hornbeam, or a mixture. Willow doesn't sucker.
If it is left to grow it will make a moderate tree or if coppiced will form a stool of new shoots but it doesn't spread.

I know goat willow spreads, and it's well known for it. It seems to self layer and a single stem forms a multi-rooted bush in a couple of years. I don't know if any other willows do it but some are very keen to root so it wouldn't surprise me.
Nicky Colour it green

Goat willow seems to self seed too - i know cos we have some tree sized weeds in the flower border.

Personally i would rather fight successful plants then try to encourage weak plants,but each to their own Smile
tai haku

I'd personally plant Holly or Hornbeam.
late to this but I'll add my twopenneth in case anyone else comes across this thread when planting - If you're going for a single species hedge I'd agree with Marches (although holly is right expensive if you're doing a lot).

Personally our hedges are a mix of a whole array of different species (at one stage it was over 50 but we lost a few here and there) but my favourite is an old hawthorn hedge which grew into "a line of trees" and which we pruned brutally and then interplanted with hazel and the odd spindle (and which has one monster crab apple sticking out the top of it). I'd totally recommend hazel but it's a bit of a shaggy dog.

The other idea I quite like the thought of is a mixed beech and hornbean for a more formal clipped hedge.
Hairyloon

Sadly, Leylandii seem to be the hedge of choice in the few new houses that are built here - you can already see them as a potential problem for many.
They make a great hedge provided that you trim them at least twice per year.
Is a kind of job creation. Wink

Back to OP, I wouldn't bother removing the stumps. Just plant between them.
The soil will be depleted and acidic though. You will need to address that.
Hairyloon

Blimey - yours was worse than ours - nightmare. I was surprised how weedy the petrol chipper we hired was - not really man-enough for the job but I couldn't hire a proper big one without the attached tree surgeon and his invoice.
HSS do one.
Wherever you hire from, make suee the blades are sharp. Last one I hired was more like a hammer mill.
I got my own now though.
Shan

Hazel is brilliant as hedging and excellent for coppicing.
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