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Penny Outskirts

One bin of rubbish a year.

http://myzerowaste.com/2010/01/the-greens-on-bbc-breakfast-tv/

Saw these people on our local news this morning, quite an achievement!
mochyn

We reckon to do 4 not-full bin bags a year.
ros

hmm, I guess ours averages a bin-bag worth a month, not sure how we'de reduce that - not until the kids stop being given endless easily broken plastic stuff anyway.
gil

If I only 'put the wheelie bin out' when it was full, [or if it didn;t always sit at the road end anyway], it would only be every 3 months or so.
cinders

If OH didn't eat so many packets of crisp we'd hardly put out any rubbish
Tavascarow

I'm probably in the same league as Mochyn.
The only rubbish I put out is plastic food wrapping & I do my best to minimise that by reusing bags for freezing food etc.
Everything else is either reused or recycled.
Green Rosie

Our house rubbish is about 1/3-1/2 a bin bag a week and I really want to get that down. I agree with Ros about the children bit and here in this part of France there is a lot of plastic we can't recycle and there are only so many yoghurt pots and marg containers you can re-use Embarassed

I might try and do a rubbish audit over the next couple of weeks and see if I can reduce it.

And I say house rubbish because I do not count the rubbish the gite renovation is creating and whilst we are re-using/recycling loads some things have no choice but to go in the bin or to the dump.
Aeolienne

Myzerowaste has made the news in Italy!
wellington womble

Personally, we are rubbish at rubbish (although better than average, judging by the wheelie bins locally) although mostly one bag a week of endless endless packaging.

There is a very good blog by Mrs Almost Average called the rubbish diet which is quite entertaining and was going to be made into a book last I read. She ended up throwing away one sticking plaster on the original 'diet'
Went

Recycling facilities here in Spain are widely available - our village has 40 permanent residents swelling to around 80 in holiday times. We have 3 recycling points each taking glass, plastic and paper. Any other recycling can be taken to other facilities about 5km away. We don't have individual rubbish bins but there again there are around 8 large community bins around the village that are emptied every two days.

We produce about the equivalent of 1 carrier bag full of rubbish per week. Trying hard to reduce this but difficult.
paul1963

Three wheelie bins per year at our house. And that's only because we can;t find anyone round here to take black plastic Very Happy
Cathryn

Recycling facilities here in Spain are widely available - our village has 40 permanent residents swelling to around 80 in holiday times. We have 3 recycling points each taking glass, plastic and paper. Any other recycling can be taken to other facilities about 5km away. We don't have individual rubbish bins but there again there are around 8 large community bins around the village that are emptied every two days.

We produce about the equivalent of 1 carrier bag full of rubbish per week. Trying hard to reduce this but difficult.


That sounds interesting. I wonder if our Councils have considered this here. Do you think it encourages recycling and using less packaging as people have to actually handle it more for themselves?
Nicky Colour it green

Re: One bin of rubbish a year.

http://myzerowaste.com/2010/01/the-greens-on-bbc-breakfast-tv/

Saw these people on our local news this morning, quite an achievement!


i dunno - they recycle loads and loads... which is good in a way - but bad in others.. we dont recycle much, cos we dont buy a lot of things that need recycling.

and we raise our own animals, so have bones etc to dispose of, whereas if you just buy from the butchers.. you can be smug about having little waste, whilst the butcher still has to dispose of the bones etc...

good on them for bringing the idea to a larger audience, but their blog is full of things like...tips on not wasting half a jar of pasta sauce.... obviously the first step is not buying the sauce in the first place... something not covered
Green Rosie

A agree CiG - the lady and I had a bit of an argument a while back over corks - she buys screw topped wine bottles that can be recycled as opposed to corked bottles. Corks are farmed sustainably from the Iberian cork forests which support many rare species including the Iberian Lynx. No cork, no need for cork forests. She acknowledged this to me privately but would not put anything on her bog about it. It seems to be that she's going for zero waste even when a little waste is in fact far more sustainable. judith

I use corks for starting the fire - so they aren't wasted.
(Not that I have loads of corks at any one time, you understand .... Embarassed )
Green Rosie

A friend takes mine and makes them into cork boards Very Happy cinders

I'm not sure if its on her blog, but i read recently that she wrote you can compost corks by grinding them up. Someone responsed by saying it was too much work and they made boards out of them instead. It also seems to me she recycles alot too, maybe her target audience is mr and mrs average consumer Laughing Laughing gil

I use corks for starting the fire - so they aren't wasted.

Do all corks burn ? Even the kind-of plastic-y or composite corks ?
That's interesting - I always assumed they'd end up a stinky mess in a fire.
judith

Plastic corks are the work of the devil. I'd rather have a screw top. Very Happy Nicky Colour it green

I'm not sure if its on her blog, but i read recently that she wrote you can compost corks by grinding them up. Someone responsed by saying it was too much work and they made boards out of them instead. It also seems to me she recycles alot too, maybe her target audience is mr and mrs average consumer Laughing Laughing

you can compost corks by not grinding them up too... but chucking them on the fire is what i do. although my wine drinking is either homebrew or cheap.. and cheap seems to come in screw top bottles.. which in turn is handy for homebrew..

you are right - i doubt we here are her target audience... but it would be good if the message was 'you can make your own pasta sauce' rather than 'look at me im so good i recycle 1000s of glass jars and it still uses energy to transport and re melt them but who cares about that im measuring it in bins '


IMO the emphasis is all about how much goes to landfill, without looking at the larger picture - ie whether her choices are still worse for the environment or if someone else has to throw away the rubbish instead of her.
cinders

I think she is quite happy to pass her rubbish around, out of sight out of mine and then sings her own praises, i'm sure she could do more like you said, by making from scratch etc, therefore producing less waste Jamanda

A agree CiG - the lady and I had a bit of an argument a while back over corks - she buys screw topped wine bottles that can be recycled as opposed to corked bottles. Corks are farmed sustainably from the Iberian cork forests which support many rare species including the Iberian Lynx. No cork, no need for cork forests. She acknowledged this to me privately but would not put anything on her bog about it. It seems to be that she's going for zero waste even when a little waste is in fact far more sustainable.

Why does she think corked bottles can't be recycled? We tend to re-use the corkable ones with homebrew, where as the screw bottles go into the recycling bin.

And I'd have thought a cork could be burned or composted as a pose to screw top that is thrown away.
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