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Fee

Peeled and Uncooked Potatoes - How long

If spuds are peeled and put in water in the fridge, how long would you happily keep them there before using them (for roasties in this case)?

They're not part-cooked, just peeled and under water.
alison

In this weather, not in the fridge, but outside the back door, in a pan and lid, with water changed 3 / 4 times a day, and a slice of mothers pride on the top, about 2 days, or check about going slimey.
Tavascarow

A piece of charcoal or even coal will keep the water fresh for days & save changing.
Fee

It's actually a friend who said on Facebook she's peeled the spuds and parsnips for our 'friends Christmas' on Saturday afternoon, yesterday lunchtime, and has them in water in the fridge.

I'm more worried about it because one of our friends is pregnant and being very careful with everything, she's already worried about the turkey, because the person cooking the main this year isn't the best of cooks between us, in fact we've never actually sampled much of her cooking at all. It's not a big issue there though, because we'll be keeping an eye on it, but the spuds and parsnip we can't do much about.

Herrumph.

I actually suspect she's telling porkies and actually she's bought ready peeled veg, I hope so.
Fee

She says she's followed this method: http://www.ehow.com/how_5014897_keep-peeled-potatoes-fresh.html
cab

Changing the water every day and storing in the fridge? Personally I'd be nervous to keep them for more than a week; they're oddly perishable are spuds.

Personally, I'd store them with the skins on, unwashed, unpeeled, until I needed them...
sean

At work we store them in water with Drywhite (metabisulphite) in it. We don't keep them for more than 24 hours and you need to rerumble them if you're using them the next day because the outsides go tough.
Fee

cab wrote:

Personally, I'd store them with the skins on, unwashed, unpeeled, until I needed them...


Likewise, cab! Can't fathom it myself.
sean

And I'd do what cab says for domestic use. Work's different 'cos they need spuds ready to chip if they're more busy than usual.
Rosemary Judy

and the vitamin C starts to leach out into the water.... so as a nutritional concern, it is not a good idea. Much better nutritionally to prepare as close to eating as possible. and with as small a gap as poss between harvesting.
But as a one off for a special meal it is ok.

( I always feel totally guilty as I peel potatoes and leave them in water overnight, and prepare sprouts to put in a poly box in the fridge on Christmas Eve for the following day)
cab

Rosemary Judy wrote:

( I always feel totally guilty as I peel potatoes and leave them in water overnight, and prepare sprouts to put in a poly box in the fridge on Christmas Eve for the following day)


And so you should. Inflicting sprouts on people at Christmas... Wink
Fee

I just don't get why she's done it so far in advance, there's plenty of hands to help with such things, and more than enough time on the day.

She probably doesn't realise though as she's usually sat on her backside out of the kitchen and away from any of the prep.
dpack

new potatoes Wink
why do peeps need to boil sprouts from november?
Fee

dunno, I love sprouts, but even I struggle with mushed ones.
maryf

Elfin safetywise even the really slimey spuds and other veg will do no harm if boiled for at least 10 mins, but nutritionally they will lose most of their values. They also won't look that good on a plate . . . but do get the turkey to over 70 degrees right through for safety. In both cases the taste will probably not be that great but 99.9per cent of bacteria will have been killed. What more do you want? How do you think the human race has survived thus far?
Rosemary Judy

I stir fry sprouts - totally differnt taste experience. They don't taste much like boiled sprouts at all.

in fact, i stir fry most brassicas, as they taste so much better this way. A bit of chilli and garlic helps too.
( and are nutritionally better too - more of the water soluble vits survive, and the little bit of oil helps absorbtion of other stuff)
RichardW

sean wrote:
At work we store them in water with Drywhite (metabisulphite) in it. We don't keep them for more than 24 hours and you need to rerumble them if you're using them the next day because the outsides go tough.


But thats cos you rumbled them in the first place. Rumbled spuds dont keep as long as peeled ones..


They should keep for a couple of days max. You could vac pack them & they will keep longer & longer still if you gas flush them.
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