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Fee

Price of Chicken in Supermarkets

I've noticed that the price of free range chicken in supermarkets seems to have sky-rocketed lately. Sainsbury's want £9.70 for 4 free range organic chicken breasts and ASDA wasn't much less.

I buy most of our meat from our local butcher, so haven't noticed a gradual increase, but was gobsmacked and quite angry when I saw how much they were asking.

We consciously don't buy anything other than free-range chicken, and we're all being encouraged to, yet the supermarkets have the cheak to charge such prices. We don't mind paying extra for well-treated meat, but twice the price is scandalous.

We walked away from the entire meat section in disgust, and won't be going back in a hurry.

What's worrying is that anything 'eco', 'ethical' or 'green' seems to be having it's price ramped up in the supermarkets. How on Earth can low-income families be expected to pay these prices? They simply can't.

Sorry, had to have a rant.

I might have gone up to the butcher counter and had a bit of a moan too, then as I was in a ranty mood by then, asked him what was meant by 'traditionally reared meat' (which is says on loads of the labels on the meat counter), and shock horror, he didn't have a clue what I was even talking about, never mind what it meant!
bernie-woman

It is much cheaper to buy the whole bird and then joint it yourself - I bought one from the supermarket last week for 6.95 Very Happy
tahir

Until organic and free range become a really significant part of our meat trade the supermarkets will always charge a ridiculous premium, as volume goes up their margin will go down.
Jonnyboy

I was just about to suggest that B.

How much are non free range chicken breasts?
Northern_Lad

If you were looking at the packs of breasts then the prices are truely creative.

If the price of whole chickens has got over £2 each up to a reasonable price then that's a good thing.
Fee

Jonnyboy wrote:
I was just about to suggest that B.

How much are non free range chicken breasts?


Less than a fiver for the same amount, pretty much half price.

Yeah, I should joint it myself really...never done it before thogh, have we got an article on that? Laughing
Northern_Lad

Fee wrote:
Yeah, I should joint it myself really...never done it before thogh, have we got an article on that? Laughing


Can someone else oblige, please.
judith

Happy to, NL Laughing
Jonnyboy

Fee wrote:

Less than a fiver for the same amount, pretty much half price.

Yeah, I should joint it myself really...never done it before thogh, have we got an article on that? Laughing


Laughing

That said, I think it's probably a mistake to compare the two. A decent butcher or Fm will sell you a bird for around £10 - £12 that will do three meals easily.

Muchus bargianio
bagpuss

whether you are buying from a butcher or a supermarket the most cost efficient way to buy organic chicken is whole

when I do buy chicken from the supermarket a whole organic one tends be around £6 - £10 for one that is between 1 and 2kg
Fee

Found it Smile

How to Joint a Chicken Smile
Fee

judith wrote:
Happy to, NL Laughing


lol, missed that Wink
Fee

bagpuss wrote:
whether you are buying from a butcher or a supermarket the most cost efficient way to buy organic chicken is whole

when I do buy chicken from the supermarket a whole organic one tends be around £6 - £10 for one that is between 1 and 2kg


Yeah, I will be in future. We dont buy much meat, and when we do, it's usually from our local butcher, and thinking about it, I don't really pay any notice to how much I'm paying (that's terrible), but I do end up spending quite a bit come to think about it!
Green Man

Now you can see the difference in price between free range/ organic and broiler, perhaps it explains why millions of chichens are reared and fed to millions of people. In the old days most people could not afford to eat much chicken. Most families today eat meat with every main course. The price jump you have witnessed is probably just the same as other new products that supermarkets ply. They start of cheap as chips, and when the local butcher shops and farm shops have closed their doors, they hike the price up to full margin. A margin they need to retail from glass palaces. Modern consumers don't seem to like sawdust on the butcher's floor nowadays.
Jonnyboy

The good old Loss Leader Wink
Behemoth

Toscos were selling organic breasts for over £6 a pair but I picked some up in the flogitoffsellbydate section for £3.
hamster

It's the same for eggs! It was £1.40-£1.50 for 6 free range eggs at Tesco/Sainsbury's last time I went, but buying them from M&S (usually more expensive) only costs 99p, the farmer's market it's £1 and the local market is 78p.

Yet, at the same time the supermarkets are selling 15 battery eggs for about £1 (or maybe less). It seems mind-boggling, that they can simultaneously create artificially low and artificially high prices for the same product. I sometimes wonder if they deliberately overprice the organic and free range produce to put the majority of shoppers off buying it, so they can carry on with the cheap (and cruel) production because 'that's what people want'.

But that, of course, would be very cynical.
dpack

i enjoy eating chicken and will pay for a proper one if i can find one
locally , direct from the producer is best
pay for quaility or buy the cheapest or grow your own .
gil

There was a predicted shortage of free-range eggs and poultry in the wake of bird flu possibility.

In addition, there is currently a serious shortage of organic poultry and livestock feed, because not enough UK arable farmers converted to organic to keep pace with the number of organic livestock farmers. Feed therefore has to be imported, but there's a shortage of that too.

Shortage of feed leads to higher feed prices, leads to higher prices for the consumer
Fee

dpack wrote:
i enjoy eating chicken and will pay for a proper one if i can find one
locally , direct from the producer is best
pay for quaility or buy the cheapest or grow your own .


price doesn't always reflect quality
never buy the cheapest if that means battery
no room to grow my own
Green Man

hamster wrote:
It's the same for eggs! It was £1.40-£1.50 for 6 free range eggs at Tesco/Sainsbury's last time I went, but buying them from M&S (usually more expensive) only costs 99p, the farmer's market it's £1 and the local market is 78p.

Yet, at the same time the supermarkets are selling 15 battery eggs for about £1 (or maybe less). It seems mind-boggling, that they can simultaneously create artificially low and artificially high prices for the same product. I sometimes wonder if they deliberately overprice the organic and free range produce to put the majority of shoppers off buying it, so they can carry on with the cheap (and cruel) production because 'that's what people want'.

But that, of course, would be very cynical.


Remember millions and millions of imported free range/organic eggs sold in some supermarkets have been proven to be no such thing, in fact they are from battery cages smaller than allowed here and fed on cheap non organic poltry feed. I'm sure M&S's expensive eggs are more likley to be the real thing, not so sure of Tesco though. Rolling Eyes
Behemoth

Thus proving the need for strict regulation of farming by such bodies as Defra etc.

Personally I go for the free range ones with Yorkshire in the address.
Welsh Girls Allotment

I have switched to buying my eggs from my local pet shop, 75p for half a dozen free range eggs, when supermarkets charge almost £1 for barn eggs I was suprised to get such a good deal from a small independant supplier - by asking the shop owner I even know the farm and the farmer the eggs come from winners all around Laughing
Green Man

Are the eggs from the pet shop legal? ie size graded,and stamped with a producer's code and number?
Fee

Welsh Girls Allotment wrote:
I have switched to buying my eggs from my local pet shop, 75p for half a dozen free range eggs, when supermarkets charge almost £1 for barn eggs I was suprised to get such a good deal from a small independant supplier - by asking the shop owner I even know the farm and the farmer the eggs come from winners all around Laughing


Excellent Very Happy
Fee

Ok, bought a whole free range chicken from my butcher for £6 Shocked

Now to joint it...there's a first time for everything! Quite excited actually
judith

Just make sure your knife is sharp - then you shouldn't have any problems.
bagpuss

also remember if you leave meat of the carcass don't worry you can always strip if off to add to soup after you have turned it into stock
RichardW

Cho-ku-ri wrote:
Are the eggs from the pet shop legal? ie size graded,and stamped with a producer's code and number?


Sorry but they dont HAVE to be sized or graded. As long as they are stamped with a producer number (avaliable free from the EMI) (not a packing station number) they are legal. You can only grade / size eggs if you are a packing station.


Justme
Welsh Girls Allotment

I have the aforementioned eggs in front of me - they are in plain brown box (recycled), and they are indeed stamped 3-uk which I presume means size 3 and that they are from the UK - (just call me Sherlock) beneath this is 5 digit number which I imagine is the producers identifier as for date that was on a preprinted label on the wicker basket I picked them out of Laughing
Jonnyboy

doesn't '3' mean free range
Welsh Girls Allotment

haven't a clue ? if it does that makes me feel even better Laughing
Welsh Girls Allotment

http://www.defra.gov.uk/foodrin/poultry/trade/marking/eggmarking.htm

just found this may prove helpful to some one
Jonnyboy

Welsh Girls Allotment wrote:
haven't a clue ? if it does that makes me feel even better Laughing


Ready to explode?

3 - means cage.
Welsh Girls Allotment

Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Mad

No way ! that's the end of that then Crying or Very sad
Jonnyboy

Quote:
Code Example: 1-UK-1234501

1= Production method (1–Free Range, 2-Barn, 3-Cages, 0-Organic)

UK= Country of origin

12345= Supplier Code

01= Optional identifier for flock, barn etc.
Jonnyboy

Welsh Girls Allotment wrote:
Twisted Evil Twisted Evil Mad

No way ! that's the end of that then Crying or Very sad


You sure? How about a call to local trading standards? Twisted Evil
Green Man

That explains the 75p for free range eggs then. Wink
Welsh Girls Allotment

Cho-ku-ri wrote:
That explains the 75p for free range eggs then. Wink



you got there before me!

I'm off for a little walk to the shop to see what he has to say Confused
gil

Not necessarily - going rate for free range eggs round here is 50p/half dozen direct from the producer, so you might imagine that a shop could sell them on for 75p and still make a profit.
Green Man

85P per half dozen for large free range eggs (not organic) direct from a registered producer up here in Perthshire.
bagpuss

I have had eggs marked 3 from a farm shop where I saw the hens laying them

is there some charge involved with being certified free range?
Green Man

bagpuss wrote:
I have had eggs marked 3 from a farm shop where I saw the hens laying them

is there some charge involved with being certified free range?

Perhaps you were lulled into thinking the eggs you bought were laid there, but perhaps they might have been bought in to satisfy demand?
bagpuss

Cho-ku-ri wrote:
bagpuss wrote:
I have had eggs marked 3 from a farm shop where I saw the hens laying them

is there some charge involved with being certified free range?

Perhaps you were lulled into thinking the eggs you bought were laid there, but perhaps they might have been bought in to satisfy demand?


Given you can collect the eggs from the chickens and given the nature of the shop I would be very surprised if that was the case
Green Man

Are they laid with the stamp on? Laughing
Jonnyboy

Laughing
Welsh Girls Allotment

have returned from my fact finding mission Laughing

spoke to the owner of the pet shop and asked him did he realise that the eggs he is selling are battery eggs, well he said they are from caged hens he said yes I said battery eggs - they come from a farm he said Shocked as if that was different ?

in all fairness he does not market them as free range at the moment, I bought eggs from him a year or two ago and a local farmer was supplying him, so I automatically assumed he had the same supplier, however the eggs are laid out in a wicker basket on a bed of straw, I appreciate that this is no assumption of origin but it seems immoral to me to present the eggs in this fashion for them to turn out to be in effect battery eggs or am I missing the point of marketing ?
Green Man

You've not missed the point, you have just got it. Supermarkets do this all the time with 'finest' labels etc.
judith

I guess if he isn't advertising them as free range, then he isn't breaking any rules. But the wicker basket business is a very cynical bit of marketing IMO - no better than all those "farm fresh" euphemisms.
I suspect the owner was well aware of what he was doing and I would be taking my business elsewhere.
Well done for confronting him about it though.
Jonnyboy

judith wrote:
I guess if he isn't advertising them as free range, then he isn't breaking any rules. But the wicker basket business is a very cynical bit of marketing IMO - no better than all those "farm fresh" euphemisms.
I suspect the owner was well aware of what he was doing and I would be taking my business elsewhere.
Well done for confronting him about it though.


Agree on all points
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