Archive for Downsizer For an ethical approach to consumption
 


       Downsizer Forum Index -> Make Your Own/DIY
tahir

Project 2 Completed

Got the cot completed and delivered on Saturday:
















Having no experience, or plan to follow meant that it took a lot longer to finish than anticipated, but we're happy with the result and we've learnt loads doing it
dpack

nice work.well done

what is next?
tahir

nice work.well done

what is next?


cupboard fronts for laundry room, 2 beds and some bedsides, oh and bookshelves for kitchen
dpack

when you get to the cupboard doors it might be worth considering getting a set of "drills for blum hinges" (screwfix etc) and using blum hinges .(about 20 for the drills and the hinges cost a bit more than flat ones but they will save time in getting a good standard of finish)

the advantages are

easy to adjust for level and flat hanging,soft close available ,step away opening so positioning is easier etc etc

well fitted they last far better than flat hinges

dont show on outside

they might look a bit complex but they are actually quite easy and far easier to get a good result than flat hinges
robkb

Nice work. If I tried that it'd be ready for their wedding...
tahir

We already have some Blum hinges here, builders chippy was supposed to have done it but he was blinking useless so I asked him to stop.

Is this what I need?

http://www.screwfix.com/p/hinge-cutter-tct-35mm/11596

Just a bit worried about getting it accurately positioned and straight, would be more confident with a pillar drill
mousjoos

That's the bit you need; it is for a pillar drill, but can be used in a router; difficult to use in a power drill as they are meant for drilling "blind" holes...usually Blum's are set in 4mm from the edge of the door, & as dpack says are easier than you might otherwise imagine
tahir

That's the bit you need; it is for a pillar drill, but can be used in a router; difficult to use in a power drill as they are meant for drilling "blind" holes...usually Blum's are set in 4mm from the edge of the door, & as dpack says are easier than you might otherwise imagine


Ta for that, I do find it hard to align the router precisely though. No markings at all, not even a centre line, is there a technique I should be using?
tahir

Use a jig, either hand made or bought. Not done it myself but a quick google shows lots of ideas.

I have knocked up jigs for a few different uses already, just wondered if there was something simpler that I'm missing. Having never actually seen a router in use before trying one for the 1st time on this project I could be doing things in far harder ways than they need to be...
Treacodactyl

I removed my post when I realised what type the hinges were. Basically you just want a wound hole?

I assume you have a guide on the router you can set for one edge? Then all you need is a straight edge clamped to the door for the base of the router that is 90 to edge guide to sit against.

Practice on a scrap piece of wood to check your measurements.
tahir

Practice on a scrap piece of wood to check your measurements.

That's the bit that affects marital harmony, wife just wants to get on with the job, she's a bit gung ho! But yes I guess I'll end up doing something similar to what you suggest
mousjoos

That's the bit you need; it is for a pillar drill, but can be used in a router; difficult to use in a power drill as they are meant for drilling "blind" holes...usually Blum's are set in 4mm from the edge of the door, & as dpack says are easier than you might otherwise imagine

Ta for that, I do find it hard to align the router precisely though. No markings at all, not even a centre line, is there a technique I should be using?

If you use a router & fence, the easiest way is to for instance mark the 4mm from the edge & align the outer edge of the bit with that mark...if you decide to mark the centre of the bit then align the point in the centre of the bit with your mark
It depends on the size of the router; assuming it's 1/2 inch collet then it will almost certainly have "slow start" &/or variable speed; it will need a 10mm collet for the hinge bit (usually)
You can, at a push, use it freehand but on the low speed setting & after a little practice
You may already know this, but when this type of bit is spinning you can see the centre point, & this makes it again much easier than you might think to achieve the end result
The router, once you have the hang of things will become almost always the most versatile power tool in the workshop
tahir

You may already know this, but when this type of bit is spinning you can see the centre point, & this makes it again much easier than you might think to achieve the end result
The router, once you have the hang of things will become almost always the most versatile power tool in the workshop

Didn't know that, will try it. Deffo v useful and quick, couldn't have done the cot without it
tahir

If you use a router & fence, the easiest way is to for instance mark the 4mm from the edge & align the outer edge of the bit with that mark

Of course, on this it's the edge that we need to mark accurately, not the centre. D'oh! (See what I mean about not having done this stuff before?)
dpack

wot they said re big hole ,jigs etc ,

re the drills the set of 3 small ones are ace for cupboard doors (and other thin items)as only the end bit drills and they have a stop to prevent piercing all the way through a finished door

if they only prevent one accident they will pay for themselves Wink

im not saying why i like these but they are better than a bit of tape,grub screwed collor or stick type depth guages Laughing
tahir

Project 3 has also been completed



Click to see full size image



Click to see full size image



Click to see full size image
tahir

As you can see we're working almost exclusively in plywood, we have 1 bed and another 4 bedside cabinets (started already) to do before we move onto cupboards BUT how the flip do you keep cupboard doors from warping? Even relatively small bits of ply like the top of these drawers (500x450) can warp, what chance do I stand with something 1800x600? vegplot

I really like that.

Somewhere to store my new seat while the bike is being finished...


sean

Aren't cupboard doors usually made of mdf? (Commercial ones anyway.) tahir

Fibreglass? How come you've got time to be messing round with bikes, you're building a house aren't you? tahir

Aren't cupboard doors usually made of mdf? (Commercial ones anyway.)

I guess they probably are, unfortunately nephew (recipient of cot) has asked if we can make a cupboard to go with it.
vegplot

Fibreglass? How come you've got time to be messing round with bikes, you're building a house aren't you?

Building regulations - still!
tahir

Blinking nora, hope they get sorted soon Behemoth

As you can see we're working almost exclusively in plywood, we have 1 bed and another 4 bedside cabinets (started already) to do before we move onto cupboards BUT how the flip do you keep cupboard doors from warping? Even relatively small bits of ply like the top of these drawers (500x450) can warp, what chance do I stand with something 1800x600?

Ply will warp. You need MDF, some sort of engineered wood or frame and panel. Once you get the laminate on you cant tell. That's what i did in my kitchen.

Ply is generally used as a sheet material in building and when used in furniture it is to take advantage of its warpiness.

I have just read this on the internet so it must be true.
sean

I reckon that your best bet is to tell your nephew that you did make one but some bad men came and stole it. Behemoth

Or that the tree the plywood is made from grew on an old viking burial ground and consequently the cabinet is possessed by evil spirits seeking a juvenile host in which they incubate a demon beserker. tahir

Or that the tree the plywood is made from grew on an old viking burial ground and consequently the cabinet is possessed by evil spirits seeking a juvenile host in which they incubate a demon beserker.

You are full of good advice today Smile
mousjoos

Ply is fairly stable depending on the thickness ie anything under 19mm (for furniture) is a bit useless unless housed in a frame

Also makes a difference how it's stored; flat is best, maybe with a small amount of weight on top

MDF is good but again how it is stored up until the time you use it is important...again for furniture 19 mm is most commonly used

If laminating the surface make sure as much as possible that both sides are equal ie the laminate on the outside should be balanced on the inside with laminate of equal thickness, or as near as you can get
vegplot

Or that the tree the plywood is made from grew on an old viking burial ground and consequently the cabinet is possessed by evil spirits seeking a juvenile host in which they incubate a demon beserker.

You are full of good advice today Smile

You're Loki to have Behemoth around with some sage advice.
tahir

Well it is Oden's day Rolling Eyes tahir

Ply is fairly stable depending on the thickness ie anything under 19mm (for furniture) is a bit useless unless housed in a frame

Also makes a difference how it's stored; flat is best, maybe with a small amount of weight on top

MDF is good but again how it is stored up until the time you use it is important...again for furniture 19 mm is most commonly used

If laminating the surface make sure as much as possible that both sides are equal ie the laminate on the outside should be balanced on the inside with laminate of equal thickness, or as near as you can get

Not looking to laminate, just oil both sides. Generally available stuff here is 18mm birch or 20mm poplar ply, we use the birch some of which can be less than 17mm thick (apparently within tolerance)

We're looking to show the ply bands on the edge, would (e.g.) a 12mm panel inset into a 24mm ply frame (2x12mm glued) be more stable than 18mm straight??
mousjoos

In theory there's no reason why not; extra care needs to be taken when jointing ply eg with a biscuit jointer as the core is not homogenous (is that the right word?) like MDF

Depending on the overall size of the door, a frame of 24 (glued or otherwise) with a panel of 12 should be fine

I think you mentioned a size of 1800x600, if so try to incorporate a cross rail that will divide the panel(s)

Standard wooden framework for a kitchen door is generally 65mm wide, so if your design will stand it, make this the minimum...top & bottom cross rails can be that size, but a middle rail 12-15 mm wider adds a smidge more stability
tahir

Patio table:



Click to see full size image
tahir

Nesting table (only 1 yet) from plywood scraps

Click to see full size image




Click to see full size image




Click to see full size image
dpack

very Bauhaus,nice tahir

I don't think Bauhaus did cable reels Laughing dpack

i recon the cable reel table is a classic as well ,i have had a few and they are very useful.

they paint quite well and can look ace in either plain or fancy style
tahir

We managed to finish the laundry room (with the copper pipe handles) but I don't seem to have any pics so here's the latest bedside that we've just completed. Still all ply, but we are making a cherry coffee table for my niece soon (from bits of left over stair treads).


Click to see full size image


Click to see full size image

Not our most succesful piece, we found it very difficult to keep the stacked ply sides straight in clamping, we should really have gone oversized and thicknessed to size.
sean



Not our most succesful piece, we found it very difficult to keep the stacked ply sides straight in clamping, we should really have gone oversized and thicknessed to size.

Surely you mean 'We decided to go for the hand-crafted artisanal look with this piece.' Wink

Looks OK to me. Certainly better than I'd manage.
tahir

Just look at the way the drawer sits Rolling Eyes

You live, and sometimes you learn Smile
dpack

very nice,i admire your patience re making and glueing all those strips. tahir

It was blinking fiddly, lots of sanding too mousjoos

Just look at the way the drawer sits Rolling Eyes

You live, and sometimes you learn Smile

For drawer sides whether dovetailed or not, try to use "drawer side ply"...it's not generally called that outside the trade, but is uni directional ply which means edges can be sanded without the need to veneer them first

Drawer sides should be at least a couple of millimetres wider than the front to allow fitting, making sure that all the top edges are flush...DSP also planes well making fitting easy
tahir

Drawer sides should be at least a couple of millimetres wider than the front to allow fitting, making sure that all the top edges are flush...DSP also planes well making fitting easy

Sorry, not quite with you there, I know it's going to be difficult to explain on t'internet but is tehre a diagram or something you could point me at? Would love to be better at drawers
dpack

re the ply vs mdf thing.

although sheet mdf is fairly stable if dry and stored flat good ply is better .

with either sealing any cut edges before construction ,pilot holes etc during and then sealing inside and out after will increase long term stability.

any large sheets will be more stable if braced.have a look in well made antique furniture etc for tried and tested bracing techniques.

meeting odin in a wardrobe is likely to be rather too exciting when choosing what to wear
tahir

Drawer sides should be at least a couple of millimetres wider than the front to allow fitting, making sure that all the top edges are flush...DSP also planes well making fitting easy

Sorry, not quite with you there, I know it's going to be difficult to explain on t'internet but is tehre a diagram or something you could point me at? Would love to be better at drawers

Are saying I should oversize drawer fronts for inset drawers, and plain to fit?
mousjoos

Drawer sides should be at least a couple of millimetres wider than the front to allow fitting, making sure that all the top edges are flush...DSP also planes well making fitting easy

Sorry, not quite with you there, I know it's going to be difficult to explain on t'internet but is tehre a diagram or something you could point me at? Would love to be better at drawers

Are saying I should oversize drawer fronts for inset drawers, and plain to fit?
If a drawer (front) sits within a frame, the sides should be 2-3 mm wider than the front, or at least that much lower if the sides & front have been machined to the same width...the easiest way to visualise it is to always think of the finished drawer, & not as pieces ie sides, front etc....I know this sounds complicated but trying to put it simply, to fit the drawer correctly & more easily, you need a bit more on the bottom of the sides than on the bottom of the front....
mousjoos

Drawer sides should be at least a couple of millimetres wider than the front to allow fitting, making sure that all the top edges are flush...DSP also planes well making fitting easy

Sorry, not quite with you there, I know it's going to be difficult to explain on t'internet but is tehre a diagram or something you could point me at? Would love to be better at drawers

Drawers are very simple

Conventional drawers rely on components being flat; edges being parallel; ends being square....

meet these criteria & not much can go wrong

careful assembly makes a big difference ie careful & precise & not over zealous cramping; & no excess glue !

If ever you venture into dovetailing by hand or machine, golden rule is that dovetails only go together once
tahir

Dovetails? Shocked tahir

Drawers are very simple

I believe I'm simpler
mousjoos

Drawers are very simple

I believe I'm simpler

They're basically boxes

Dovetails....google it & see what you think

They are not obligatory in the construction of drawers
tahir

This is the laundry room, with copper pipe handles.


Click to see full size image



Click to see full size image


Click to see full size image
dpack

i like the detergent cupboard ,very user friendly . sean

He's using Fairy tabs though. Capitalist running dog of the imperialist Procter and Gamble hegemony that he is.

The cupboards look nice mind.
tahir

That's Mrs capitalist running dog, I don't touch no laundry Wink Nick

Slave master, too.

Good man.
tahir

Child labour, slave labour, all is good.....
       Downsizer Forum Index -> Make Your Own/DIY
Page 1 of 1
Home Home Home Home Home