Archive for Downsizer For an ethical approach to consumption
 


       Downsizer Forum Index -> The Apiary
tai haku

recombined hive, decombining help

So earlier in the year I first split and then due to queen failure recombined a hive. I ended up doing the newspaper combination with a broodbox sat on a queen divider above a brood and a half with her majesty in it. That's worked OK - I don't think I'll get any honey this year (and that's ok if the girls are OK) but their stores (mostly uncapped at present are all in the broodbox on top. At some point (next year I guess) I will need to take the broodbox off to use as a second hive and to put a super on.

So I'm after thoughts as to how to do this. Do I just leave it where it is for winter, pull it off as and when in Spring, uncapped stores, capped honey and all, and stick a super straight on instead?

Or should I be taking it off now, stores and all, to give the girls a smaller space to heat over winter?no smilies
Tavascarow

If you leave the brood box on over winter make sure you remove the queen excluder.
You don't want her Maj being stuck downstairs whilst the rest of the colony cluster up above amongst the stores.
You could take it off now & put it through an extractor to feed back to them, but personally I wouldn't bother.
You are far enough South not to be to troubled with really cold winter weather & it seems like a lot of faff for nothing IMHO.
When I used to run double brood colonies I never bothered reducing them down & never lost any through cold (Cornwall). If you where in Scandinavia it might be wise, but you are in the Channel Islands so a similar climate to mine.
I would wait till April/May & either split them then or continue running them as a double brood.
If you decide to split, & divide the brood & stores evenly ensuring there are eggs & young larvae in each box, whichever one is without the queen will raise queen cells.
So you will hopefully then have two colonies.no smilies
Lorrainelovesplants

Youve made a point hereTav that has made me think.....

Ive got to combine 2 colonies - one small with a queen, the other large and queenless.
Ive a mind to sit the largest at the bottom and put the small with queen on top.(with the newspaper sandwhich)
then in a few days, remove the paper and hope...
but never thought re which box the queen will end up in (ie do I remove the queen excluder?)no smilies
Tavascarow

Youve made a point hereTav that has made me think.....

Ive got to combine 2 colonies - one small with a queen, the other large and queenless.
Ive a mind to sit the largest at the bottom and put the small with queen on top.(with the newspaper sandwhich)
then in a few days, remove the paper and hope...
but never thought re which box the queen will end up in (ie do I remove the queen excluder?)

Sometimes in the winter when the queen stops laying she will slim down & can fit through an excluder anyway, but if not & she is in one box & there are stores in another chances are she may get left behind with a few attendants & may chill & die or possibly the colony will refuse to leave her & cluster in the box without food & starve, regardless that there may be kilos of honey elsewhere.
I wouldn't remove the paper, the bees should chew their way through (as long as you put a few slits in it to get them started).
You should see the remains outside the entrance after a week or so if all's well.no smilies
Lorrainelovesplants

So would you remove the queen excluder if you leave a full super for stores?lno smilies
Tavascarow

So would you remove the queen excluder if you leave a full super for stores?l

I would.
If we have a mild winter & she starts to lay early, in the super, you can remove her & put her below the queen excluder when you replace it in the spring. But chances are she will go down naturally anyway as she will want worker cells not drone at that time of year.no smilies
       Downsizer Forum Index -> The Apiary
Page 1 of 1
Home Home Home Home Home