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judith

Salty bacon

I've just taken out my latest batch of (wet cure) bacon and fried up a bit to taste. For some reason, it is a lot more salty than usual, so it will need soaking before it is used. Is it better to soak it in the piece or slice it and soak as you use it?
jema

Re: Salty bacon

Judith wrote:
I've just taken out my latest batch of (wet cure) bacon and fried up a bit to taste. For some reason, it is a lot more salty than usual, so it will need soaking before it is used. Is it better to soak it in the piece or slice it and soak as you use it?


If need be I always soak the slices, but then I make slice and freeze, so I ahve to work that way.
alison

I make slice and freeze too.

On the 3 day dry cure I don't have to soak at all, but if I forget it and leave it any longer than 5 days then we soak when we need it.
footprints

Salty bacon

Doesn't washing the bacon defeat the object of the dry cure?

2 days ago we bought some "dry cured" bacon from a butcher that had been recomended. The bacon was so wet and scummy that it took sheet after sheet of kitchen towel.
I was so disgusted that i took pictures and was going to complain.
(I didn't)

This bacon is in complete contrast to some that we had bought at a smallholders market. The end of the piece that we bought was black, and when the bacon was cooked (fryed) it cooked quickly and without any water whatsoever. Wonderful , not salty, slightly sweet bacon. 6.50 a lb Sad

Yesterday I started my first experimental bacon cure. The cure we bought off the net (organic). The instructions we are following are Alisons.

The pork is a 2kilo piece. After salting, we put the meat in a large tupperware container with a wire trivet in the bottom to keep it clear of the liquid that is drawn off. My reasoning would be that the meat is clear of the water, and will dry quicker at the end.
Am I doing wrong, and does it need to sit in the "juices" ?

Another question I would like to as is. Does anybody air dry in the summer, and where do they do it?
jema

I'd agree washing is not ideal, but in the case of your own dry cure you are still assuming decent pork to start with egaging in a different process by soaking to commercial bacon.

With commercial bacon they are using water and chemicals to bump up the weight, not to leach off excess salt.
alison

I wouldn't put it on a wire rack myself. I just leave the cured pork in a poly bag, tied in the fridge for the 3 days. I don't even bother looking at it. It sits in its juices. When I come to slice it I wash it off and dry it in the sink then slice.

I only soak the bacon now if I have cured it for more than 5 days.but soaking is done to taste, and it is good to know that it is not the end of the world if the pork stays in the cure too long.
footprints

salty bacon

alison wrote:
I wouldn't put it on a wire rack myself. I just leave the cured pork in a poly bag, tied in the fridge for the 3 days. I don't even bother looking at it. It sits in its juices. When I come to slice it I wash it off and dry it in the sink then slice.

I only soak the bacon now if I have cured it for more than 5 days.but soaking is done to taste, and it is good to know that it is not the end of the world if the pork stays in the cure too long.


The sort of finished product I am looking to make is the sort of bacon that I remember as a kid. Hung to air dry for a long time.
There is a small butchers in Dorrington that make the kind of bacon I'm after.
If we are on trips out, or going on holiday "down south" we try to detour through dorrington on the way out to get bacon for the weeks breakfast, and back through Dorrington on the way home for a piece of bacon big enough to last a couple of weeks.

We have a farming neighbour (wifes boss) that describes in great detail the salting of pork to make bacon and hams. He tells me that you can only successfully make bacon in the winter. ( I argue that with modern technology fridges etc, you must be able make bacon all year

He tells me of hams hanging in the attic, covered in cobwebs. He summed it up for me when he said, the bacon his mother made he could eat 3 times a day.

The site we bought the cure from, sausage making.org , gives a method of curing bacon that includes sealing the salted pork in plastic using a vacuum packer. 2 things I don't like about this method is: prolonged contact with plastic, and the fact that non of the natural liquid can escape.
We have somebody locally does a brine cure. Turn round for his produce is approx 5 days. he says that this is because his customers prefer a moister bacon. This is not what I'm looking for.

This thing with bacon is now turning into a bit of a quest. You know the way wine tasters walk around with a small tasting spoon on a chain around their necks? Well I am going the same way, except the frying pan on a chain is going to draw some funny looks Smile
alison

If you want to go on and air dry your ham / bacon then yes, I would do it only in the winter. The outside temperature is paramount in this.
dougal

Re: salty bacon

footprints wrote:
The sort of finished product I am looking to make is the sort of bacon that I remember as a kid. Hung to air dry for a long time.
... tells me of hams hanging in the attic, covered in cobwebs. He summed it up for me when he said, the bacon his mother made he could eat 3 times a day.

The site we bought the cure from, sausage making.org , gives a method of curing bacon that includes sealing the salted pork in plastic using a vacuum packer. 2 things I don't like about this method is: prolonged contact with plastic, and the fact that non of the natural liquid can escape. ...


I admit that I've always thought that the differential between bacon and ham curing came about because ham was dried (for a lengthy period) and bacon wasn't.

Ham would be expected to lose considerable weight (water) in its creation, while commercial bacon would gain weight by adding water. I'd expect home "dry cured" (ie no water added) bacon to lose only a little weight.

Isn't there a German product "speck" that IS specifically dried, and which isn't quite like British bacon..?

Incidentally, in a cool, briney environment, I'd be happier with food-safe plastics in contact with the food rather than most metal racks...
franco

bacon tips

footprints,

firt of all thanks for buying from my store (next time make yourself known and I'll send you a free sample of something Laughing )

The instructions on my site recommend vacuum packing the bacon or to seal it in a poly bag, the moisture that comes out of the bacon whilst curing will not go back in to make a soft soggy bacon,but once the bacon has finished curing it is important that you rinse it well and leave it hanging in a cool place to dry for a day or so, I use a fridge but if you have a cold barn and are confident that no vermin can get to it hang it there.

The cure you bought from me can be used as a traditional dry cure without sealing it in a bag or vacuum, if you choose to cure the bacon this way you should double the time in the cure.


Regards


Franco

www.sausagemaking.org
wellington womble

Nobody has mentioned not using metal - the salt will corrode it.

I can't help with making bacon, because I never have, but the reason we swapped to drycure bacon is because I read about how 'they' inject the brine into the meat forcing it to absorb lots of it, and increase its weight. Plus we prefer smoked bacon, and aparently a syntethic smoky flavouring was added to the brine cure. Obvisouly neither of these can be done per se with dry cure, so we swapped. It's better bacon, although I'm sure there are other tricks.

I bet there isn't much of a difference in brine or dry cured bacon if you do it properly - when I figure out a way to smoke it, I'll find out!
footprints

bacon again

wellington womble wrote:
Nobody has mentioned not using metal - the salt will corrode it.

I can't help with making bacon, because I never have, but the reason we swapped to drycure bacon is because I read about how 'they' inject the brine into the meat forcing it to absorb lots of it, and increase its weight. Plus we prefer smoked bacon, and aparently a syntethic smoky flavouring was added to the brine cure. Obvisouly neither of these can be done per se with dry cure, so we swapped. It's better bacon, although I'm sure there are other tricks.

I bet there isn't much of a difference in brine or dry cured bacon if you do it properly - when I figure out a way to smoke it, I'll find out!


Buy some organic sweet cure from Franco. Buy a piece of streaky belly pork (nice bit of fat? about 2kilo) Follow Alisons recipe.

Eat your own wonderful unbrined bacon in a week.

Many thanks to Alison for the inspiration. I now have a fridge full.
wellington womble

As soon as I figure out a way to smoke it, I will (oh and get some decent pork!)
Guest

I will have some 'decent' pork for sale in late Nov!!! Laughing
Get your orders in, they're selling already Shocked
Farmwoody
www.upperwoodfarm.co.uk
judith

Does this mean that Ruby & Pearl have produced? Is the webcam on?
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