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Hairyloon

Sealing an underground water leak.

Next door has a concrete front yard, which is not properly drained, so all the rain runs off and soaks into the ground at the front of the house where some of it seeps through the wall. This is technically underground, and below the damp proof course, so it arguably shouldn't be a problem, but I would like to make better use of my basement space, so I'd like to cure it.
Obviously, part of the answer is likely to be to sort out the yard so it drains into a drain, but it is not the only source of water so I'd quite like to seal the wall as well.
I wondered about knocking a hole in the ground in the vicinity of the leak and pouring something runny down it that would set into something waterproof, but the question is what?
I thought about very thin mortar made with concrete waterproofer, but I am not very convinced my that idea.
Rob R

Surely doing a proper tanking project on the basement, complete with sump, would be more practical?
dpack

there are many things you could do

a proper tanking job is the one most likely to give a dry basement

tis not cheap even if you have the skills (tis not a diy job even if you follow instructions )

it needs about 50mm in (4 layers) of 1 to 4 waterproofed cement/ sharp sand to walls and floor.

bitumen etc for any pipes etc that go in or out.

then you need to add a surface that looks ok ,rehang meters with no screw holes etc etc .

i used to earn good money making basements dry Wink
dpack

ps is the goundwater is very aggressive it needs a more extreme remedy Rolling Eyes
Hairyloon

Surely doing a proper tanking project on the basement, complete with sump, would be more practical?

That was my first thought, but tanking goes on the inside, which means the wall is actually sitting in water, and that cannot be good. Confused
So I thought a little effort to keep the water on the right side of the wall is unlikely to hurt... either that or farm fish in the wall cavity. Wink

a proper tanking job is the one most likely to give a dry basement

tis not cheap even if you have the skills (tis not a diy job even if you follow instructions )

Oh get on, it's not rocket surgery. Wink
Hairyloon

ps is the goundwater is very aggressive it needs a more extreme remedy Rolling Eyes
It's mostly only when it rains...

it needs about 50mm in (4 layers) of 1 to 4 waterproofed cement/ sharp sand to walls and floor.
Hang on, why sharp sand? I find the blunter stuff quite a lot easier to slap on the walls...
Mistress Rose

If your basement is just damp, then fine, but if you actually get water in it, it might be better to leave it as it is. If you try to stop the water you might end up with the walls being pushed in. Groundwater in this area floods a lot of cellars and they just have to pump it out to keep it below the floor level. Hairyloon

I know where you are coming from, but it is only a trickle so I don't believe it is likely to take the wall down. Cathryn

You'd be surprised at how much a trickle of water is in reality. We have a trickle of water coming into our reservoir that provides enough water for five households. crofter

Sort the drainage before doing anything else. Hairyloon

Sort the drainage before doing anything else.
Sensible, but it is not my drainage to sort, and I do not like to nag too much (and I don't really want to tell him that I'm creating a basement down there).
vegplot


That was my first thought, but tanking goes on the inside, which means the wall is actually sitting in water, and that cannot be good. Confused
That's why you'd need a as well sump as RobR suggests.
dpack

ps is the goundwater is very aggressive it needs a more extreme remedy Rolling Eyes
It's mostly only when it rains...

it needs about 50mm in (4 layers) of 1 to 4 waterproofed cement/ sharp sand to walls and floor.
Hang on, why sharp sand? I find the blunter stuff quite a lot easier to slap on the walls...

cos it produces a much stronger and less porous mortar especially with the added integral waterproofer

what they suggest about reducing the water outside and/or using a sump might help but for a dry basement which will stay dry and meet building regs tanking is usually part of the best option.

the reason it is a skilled job is that to "slap a bit of cement on the walls"is unlikely to produce the well compacted layers that a lot of experience and practice can.even the way one preps the wall makes a lot of difference to the results(needle gun it to completely roughen the surface and cut back mortar lines by a couple of cm,prime with a very thin spackle coat of marine set with no sand and put the first layerof the proper 1 to 4 +waterproofer on while that is still damp).

if you get someone to quote i would expect it would be in the order of 50 to 100 per ms depending how big it is (flat is cheeper than corners etc )and you need to include the floor

if you think swimming pool with the water outside it sort of gives a clue to the problems

the worst i have ever seen was some chaps digging a couple of feet out of a cellar to make a useable space,they had done the steel etc to hold the foundations and then started digging.as they broke through the concrete floor slab a jet of water came up and filled the cellar to a metre or so in 10 mins.i found that quite funny as they had been laughing at us wrapping a big mansion in plastic so as to paint it in the rain . we often sat on our scaffolding clapping and making sealion noises as they splashed around in a muddy cave:twisted: Laughing

it took them 2 months and a lot of work to sort that out
Hairyloon

prime with a very thin spackle coat of marine set...
wos that then. Confused
dpack

a bit like icing sugar shaken on a cake but with cement on a damp wall

it helps the adhesion of the first layer as it goes on and once it sets ,putting a spreadable mix onto a rough and in places weeping wall can be a bit challenging .

ps pva seems a good idea but it isnt as it wont dry and actually forms a slippery layer
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