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themoron

Seaweed

Hi folks,

Are there any seaweed experts here? I'd like to get into seaweed eating as I live on the coast. I've just been down to the local beach and some nice fresh specimens have been dredged up by the tide. Can anyone tell me what type of seaweed this is and is it edible?

Cheers

James :@)

Lorrainelovesplants

definately kelp. Could possibly be sugar kelp. Saccharina latissima...
Dont know if edible.
Went

If it is: http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/ancient/wild-food-entry.php?term=Sugar%20Kelp

and

http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/ancient/seaweed-guide.php
T.G

If its not edible it maybe possible to compost it. Seaweeds great for the garden and for horses (but not fed as compost)
sean

I *think* that all the seaweeds are *edible* in the sense of non-toxic. Whether they're nice to eat is a different question.
themoron

Thanks for the replies. I think I identified it finally as oarweed. I tried turning it into crisps by baking squares of it in the oven for 10 minutes as per a BBC recipe but it wasn't to my taste. Perhaps it's an acquired taste but it had a distinct salty, rotten fish flavour which was too strong for me. puke_r I can imagine it being ok if turned into a stock to flavour a fish soup but only if used sparingly.

Perhaps I'll stick with forraging in the hedgerow for now. thumbleft

Cheers

James :@)
Treacodactyl

I was going to say it might be oar weed although it's hard to see from the photo (it looks like a fan on a stick?). There are, apparently, some seaweeds to avoid but they seem to be found in deeper water.

One thing I would be cautious about is using seaweed that's drifting about as I wouldn't know what's happened to it and it might be starting to decompose.
tai haku

Thanks for the replies. I think I identified it finally as oarweed. I tried turning it into crisps by baking squares of it in the oven for 10 minutes as per a BBC recipe but it wasn't to my taste. Perhaps it's an acquired taste but it had a distinct salty, rotten fish flavour which was too strong for me. puke_r


sounds like it may have already started to turn - as others have noted washed up kelp types are likely to be a bit damaged and may have already started to go off.

I've only had oarweed crips once but the taste you're describing doesn't sound like what i tasted at all. Very Happy Surprised
Treacodactyl

I might have to try and find some fresh oar weed or sugar kelp as they both seem to be considered edible kelps and I used to buy kombu to add to bean dishes, soups and stews; and that's another kelp. Just need to find some growing rather than washing up on the beach.
Jamanda

Abottsham cliffs at really low tide. There are scars jutting out into the sea and the kelps can be seen growing in the inlets between them.
dpack

much like fish if it is floating avoid it

my fav seaweeds include ,sea lettice ,dulse ,laver ,sugarwrack ,the green grassy one that grows on limpets

kelp needs a good boil,most improve for drying and rehydrating during food prep
wildfoodie

duplicated
wildfoodie

what dpack said. you should always cut fresh and healthy weed from plants attached to the rocks, leaving the holdfast intact. Also some weeds have all their reproductive parts at the top of the fronds, so you need to cut vertical sections to ensure that it can reproduce. there's a book by Prannie Rhatigan called Irish Seaweed Kitchen which is worth a look.
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