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Jonnyboy

Simple Herb garden

I was thinking of doing an article on simple garden herbs, just a bit of background and some tips on growing.

It's easy to assume that everyone is into cooking and knows all their common herbs, so for people starting out it might be useful and stimulate debate.

Something like this for each herb, but in a bit more detail.

Quote:
Bay (Laurus Noblis)

An evergreen shrub that can grow up to 10m in a UK climate, well suited to pot life it rarely needs repotting. Prefers a sunny area although protection from the wind is advisable. Requires very little attention unless you wish to prune for decorative purposes.

Bay is an essential ingredient in bouquet garnis, it adds a fragrant flavour to soups and sauces, and especially when left to infuse (it should always be removed before serving). Bay has a great affinity with fish, pop a crumpled leaf in a fish cavity before barbequing.

Bay leaves can be dried and stored, but tend to lose their flavour over time.

Bay is traditionally used in the laurels that Olympic medallist wear, legend has it that Apollo’s temple at Delphi was roofed with bay leaves.


Probably do something on

Basil, coriander, dill, mint, sage, thyme, rosemary, chives, parsley and a few others

Any interest?
jema

Definately. I have a few books on herb, but a more concise reference would be something I would like to see,. and I am sure others would find it useful.
Lloyd

(Precis of the above ) ! Laughing That would be bloomin' handy mate. My ability to grow herbs is at best, described as retarded!
Jonnyboy

Laughing I shall get typing!!
tahir

V good. I can provide photos of Rosemary, Marjoram, Oregano, Thai Basil, Vietnamese Coriander, Coriander, Garlic Chives, Welsh Onion, Bay, Lavender, Cardomom and several Thymes if you need.
Blue Sky

Looking forward to this one. I've been so busy with the veg this year that our herb garden has been somewhat overlooked. Maybe this will urge some of us to get cracking with this important kitchen plot. It would be handy to know which are the perennials so we can reserve permanent spaces for them.
JYC

Hello,

Your herbs info would be great. I'm looking for extra resources all the time to give to primary schools and community groups.

I've posted a link below to a healthy herbs pack from the Lanarkshire Greenspace team.

http://www.greenspace.org.uk/data/greenspace/HealthyHerbs.pdf#search='healthy%20herbs%20lanarkshire%20greenspace'

Smile
wellington womble

I know herbs are supposed be tolerent of dry, infertile type conditions, but which of them are really tough? I've got two gaps I want to plant up with them - one that was a gravel strip, but has gradually silted up I think (parsley seems to do very well here already) and one that's under a corkscrew hazel, on the south-west facing side. They both get lots of sun, and the nominations are:

Another rosemary bush (can't have too much rosemary) an oregano plant (how big do they get?) a bay tree (difficult?) or some thyme (always dies on me, but I persevere)
tahir

Oregano is quite a small plant, maybe 8" high, very easy, sage is tough too
jema

wellington womble wrote:
a bay tree (difficult?)


I have a couple of Bays planted in really poor spots, after 2-3 years they are still only about a foot high, but they do seem to be persevering Smile
Blacksmith

Sounds great ! Grow a few on my patio. ( garden mint, spear mint, lemon verbina, cat mint{if you can see it from the cluster of cats} parsey, marjoram, fennel, sage, purple sage,) Could do with some info, save me buying new plants every year!)
Dave.
BTW Will ask my mate Winston, he tells me 'e grows some good 'erb !
Lloyd

Hehe..he probs won't be able to give a sensible reply, man / brother etc.! Smile
sean

Thyme doesn't like being rained on, so might do well under the hazel.
judith

wellington womble wrote:
a bay tree (difficult?)


We live at the 1000 foot mark, right on the ridge of the hill. The winds can be spectacular. We also get quite a bit of snow. I have a bay tree in my garden, planted by the previous owner. It is now about six feet tall and very bushy.
I think if you want a pompom on a stick in a fancy pot, then you have to mollycoddle them through the winter. But if you plant them in the ground and leave them to get on with it, as long as the soil is reasonably free-draining then they are fairly hardy.
wellington womble

That settles it then - a bay tree in the gravel, and thyme in the hedge! Presume they are tough enough to stand the occasional sprinkle from the dogs?
Lloyd

Highly resistant to dog sprinkle.
Treacodactyl

wellington womble wrote:
That settles it then - a bay tree in the gravel, and thyme in the hedge! Presume they are tough enough to stand the occasional sprinkle from the dogs?


Are you going to eat the 'erbs? Shocked
wellington womble

Treacodactyl wrote:
wellington womble wrote:
That settles it then - a bay tree in the gravel, and thyme in the hedge! Presume they are tough enough to stand the occasional sprinkle from the dogs?


Are you going to eat the 'erbs? Shocked


After washing! - the thyme would be safe, it was the bay I was worried about - it was lemon balm before, so it didn't matter. I'll have to buy a tall one and then eat the leaves above a foot - they're not very big dogs! Laughing
Blue Sky

jema wrote:
wellington womble wrote:
a bay tree (difficult?)


I have a couple of Bays planted in really poor spots, after 2-3 years they are still only about a foot high, but they do seem to be persevering Smile


I have a nice little bay tree. I keep it in a terracotta pot so that I can move it inside in the winter. It went out a while back and is doing just fine.
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