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Cathryn

Slate kitchen worktops

In the interest of recycling (and because I have been looking at the price of granite), does anyone have slate worksurfaces in their kitchen? If so what do you think of them? We have three large slabs which would have been salting slabs probably and I am considering using them as an island and main working surface in the kitchen.

How would I seal and protect it?
RichardW

http://kitchenworktopsshop.com/slate-worktops/
Midland Spinner

Sounds lovely, I have Slate envy.

I don't know how you'd seal it. I'd probably opt for oil or beeswax or something, (I used furniture polish on my slate floor). But I'm just guessing.
earthyvirgo

There are special slate sealants that stop them being stained.

I got a tube (I think it was a tube) when I bought a new slate slab for the lounge hearth.

EV
gz

Ask Inigo Jones
http://www.inigojones.co.uk/

Groeslon near Caernarfon
Cathryn

Thank you. It's the area I use for pastry making, in fact all the food preparation more or less. My impression of it was that it was quite a hard slate so I will go and have a look at it again and hope it's going to be suitable. It's in the undergrowth somewhere. Smile
gz

I know it is quite a way, but they will re-furbish old worktops/windowsills etc. I had some done when we lived in Nantlle.
They do a good job too, and it is nice to support a local independant firm
yummersetter

I have a polished slate worktop in the bathroom and though its sealed, the surface reacts really quickly with some cleaning products and goes cloudy - like a french polished table when you put a mug of tea on it.

I'm going to try and resurface it one day but am not sure what will kill and what will cure among the dozens of stone cleaning products on the shelf
Jonnyboy

Thank you. It's the area I use for pastry making, in fact all the food preparation more or less. My impression of it was that it was quite a hard slate so I will go and have a look at it again and hope it's going to be suitable. It's in the undergrowth somewhere. Smile


Lovely cool slate, great for pastry.
mochyn

I've got a slate work surface in the kitchen. It doesn't really stain. It was cut for me by the local monumental mason.
Cathryn

I've got a slate work surface in the kitchen. It doesn't really stain. It was cut for me by the local monumental mason.


Oh thank you, I will remember that. We know our local one quite well.
Mr O

I've got a slate work surface in the kitchen. It doesn't really stain. It was cut for me by the local monumental mason.

Oh thank you, I will remember that. We know our local one quite well. It would be interesting to here what you can read on the underside. sean

It would be interesting to here what you can read on the underside.

"If you can read this you are not dead and should start tunneling upwards before the air runs out."
gil

I've got a slate work surface in the kitchen. It doesn't really stain. It was cut for me by the local monumental mason.

Oh thank you, I will remember that. We know our local one quite well.

In which case, have you asked him for a price on marble ? Offcuts, etc.
Ty Gwyn

Linseed Oil is a good sealer for Slate. gz

linseed oil needs thinning a little, otherwise it can get very sticky, very quickly Confused
I always use boiled linseed oil.

I can't remember what I thinned it with, but it was a natural product.
Brownbear

Anyone who lacks either an enormous slate slab, or the thousands necessary to buy granite or slate worktops, can easily create a good-looking and inexpensive alternative.

Take two thicknesses of 18mm plywood, laminate them together with PVA, then fit them to the tops of your kitchen units. Tile the top with slate flooring tiles, grout with an appropriate hue of grout, then when it's nearly dry, polish the grout very well with a slightly moist cloth. Fix a bit of hardwood to the front of the surface as an edging, and seal the tiles with an appropriate product.

Cost a couple of hundred at the most, looks great, very durable surface.
gz

a good idea if you can get slate flooring tiles smooth enough. Brownbear

a good idea if you can get slate flooring tiles smooth enough.

Just sort through them in the tile shop. You can also use the stone or terracotta ones if you prefer those.
T.G

We have a large slate mantel and fire surround – I realise this isn’t a work surface in a kitchen before any smart alec remarks.

But we’ve found the slate takes a really high level of heat, and marks considerably (white marks) when left with any standing water (like an over filled vase left by a well meaning visitor when I was ill). It also takes a lot of cleaning and is absorbent so sealing it really well with whatever product you locate would be advisable.

It is also something to consider but slate can chip, surprisingly easily, however there is a very good stone glue product which dries almost invisible and I know masons use it to repair small chips and bond stone together. So you can repair it.
Mutton

Linseed oil
Think you might want to avoid that on a food preparation surface. I have a dim memory from re-enactment days of being told to avoid using linseed oil on our wooden bowls for food and to use an edible oil instead. You might want to check that.
Cathryn

Thanks all. Useful advice. wellington womble

You can buy slate sealant for floor tiles. I love the stuff (himself wouldn't hear of it. He likes beige) It doesn't like red wine or lemon juice though - fizzzzzz.

And you can chalk note to yourself on it. Sounds ideal to me! I'm very jealous.
Cathryn

I could leave lists. Laughing wellington womble

I often do on the slate tablemats (brilliant idea - I think we nicked it off Cab, and it's slowly being adopted by everyone else I know!) and notes for himself.

And visiting children love drawing on it!
mochyn

Lemon juice marks go quite quickly, though. Ruralnaedowell

Olive oil is good too RichardW

Watch out if using veg / edible oils.

They can encourage moulds / go rancid.

I think they recommend non toxic mineral oils.
gz

that could be why I was told to use Boiled Linseed Oil Smile dpack

I've got a slate work surface in the kitchen. It doesn't really stain. It was cut for me by the local monumental mason.

Oh thank you, I will remember that. We know our local one quite well. It would be interesting to here what you can read on the underside.

choker Laughing
RichardW

that could be why I was told to use Boiled Linseed Oil Smile

Its not actually boiled any more.

They just add chemicals to make it behave like boiled Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes IE dry out quicker.
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