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dpack

spaying ?

we have decided to get ki done cos there are too many pups and it is a long term bonus for lady dogs (tumours, pyometra etc)and a lot less mess n bother for us twice a year

salukis have a fairly low tumour risk and a moderate pyo risk from the few studies that include them

as cut and scoop the lot seems to have greater "trauma"than keyhole ovary only surgery which reduces tumors and stops seasons it seems sensible to go for that.

what do you folk think?
iaf

My dog was done earlier this year; I think it was more traumatic for me than her!

If you have a good vet there should be no issue.
NorthernMonkeyGirl

Honestly I wasn't aware that you could just have the ovaries out. Although with pyometra being a womb infection, would leaving the womb in leave the risk the same?

Mine was mature (6 or 7 years) when I had her done, I was a little worried about the incision wound because I'd never seen one healing before, and she took a week or two to start bouncing around again (rather than a young dog who is expected to be boinging around within a few days).

After 7 months I haven't noticed any adverse effects (hairloss, weight gain, character change, whatever else they say) and she still enjoys flirting with the boys Rolling Eyes
Treacodactyl

I would be very reluctant to get another bitch spayed after having to rush ours to a different emergency vet with blood pouring from the wound the original vet sent her home with. Confused
Lloyd

As with NMG, if you have a good vet, it is a good idea to cut and scoop and get it all out. Probably cheaper in the overall longer term picture too.
sueshells

Had my girl done earlier this year, aged 8 and for medical reasons. (She had an infection that wasn't clearing up). Full op - everything out. Apart from being woozy the day I collected her she had no ill effects whatsoever and healed amazingly quickly. She didn't bother her stitches or even seem to notice that she had a wound on her stomach. I suppose it really does depend on the vet - ours have always been excellent. Our dogs, all of which have had ops for various things, from teeth problems to grass seeds to mammary tumours, have never had any adverse outcomes.

(With grateful thanks to the Vet Centre, Maids Moreton).
iaf

Mine doesn't flirt but she does try to hump her bed Rolling Eyes
joanne

Having lost my beloved Mog last year to a closed pyometra, I'd definitely have her done if you aren't intending to breed from her. I would have the womb removed as well
evie2

We've always had our bitches spayed with no problems, for one of them it was a must as she would just stand around crying and making a mess. We weren't going to have our collie Mist spayed until she'd had a litter however after the trauma of almost loosing our moggy Bramble because of retained placentas and a dead unborn kitten, leaving us with a 620.00 bill we're reconsidering.
Treacodactyl

Mine doesn't flirt but she does try to hump her bed Rolling Eyes


Ours gives her bed a very thorough seeing to after dinner, and she has been done. (No idea why a bitch would do such a thing, anyone know)?
NorthernMonkeyGirl

Mine doesn't flirt but she does try to hump her bed Rolling Eyes


Ours gives her bed a very thorough seeing to after dinner, and she has been done. (No idea why a bitch would do such a thing, anyone know)?

Bed getting all uppity and needed putting back in its place? Laughing
gregotyn

I have had 2 bitches, both were been spayed due to pyometre, and both luckily lived, to a good age, 13, due mainly to good vets; don't hesitate if you are not intending to breed. Less hassle all round, no 'wrong' time and no bloody nuisance dogs giving grief at the gate or nearer if they could be!
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