Archive for Downsizer For an ethical approach to consumption
 


       Downsizer Forum Index -> Finance and Property
Cathryn

Stabilising internal walls

Last year we replaced half of the roof and sorted out a leaking drainpipe down the front of the house. As a consequence the walls are drying out and the internal plaster, crumbling apart, from the bedroom to the dining room. (It's never straightforward is it. Rolling Eyes) This includes the coving which is not hugely ornate but would be impossible to replace in small lengths (Victorian). Chunks have fallen and we are back to the lathe, plaster and horse hair in some places.

I was wondering if there is anyway of stabilising it in the short term or do we have to accept it's shot and that it will all have to be replaced. (Too expensive at the moment.)

The same is going to happen on the other side of the house when we eventually replace the rest of the roof.
T.G

I'd have thought it would depend on how bad it is.

There are all kinds of things you can do short-term to bodge it, but that's all it'll be, it reads as if it's a re-do job.

I've found dry wall adhesive is a godsend for those need to do something now but don't want to do it all jobs(for whatever reason) it goes off quickly, it sticks to almost anything, does small, medium or larger jobs, cracks holes or bonding, you can sand it, it's relatively cheap and easy to get hold of, comes in a big sack, is easy to prepare and apply and can be painted over.
vegplot

Try spraying diluted PVA onto the plaster. This will help stabilise the surface in the short term.
Treacodactyl

Whatever you use ensure it doesn't stick too well. When I had to hack off some old plaster and render a patch had been treated with something that made it almost impossible to hack the old stuff off. In the end some of the underlying bricks broke off with the old render steadfastly attached to it.
Cathryn

Thank you. I've had some advice from the AECB forum as well (including a scarey mention about dry rot). When I'm feeling brave I will go and look at it and see if I can actually tackle it at all.
Behemoth

To do a proper job Specialists can patch old cornices (he says looking at 2ft of water damage) . It costs but not as much as you might think.
Jamanda

To do a proper job Specialists can patch old cornices (he says looking at 2ft of water damage) . It costs but not as much as you might think.


Have you been flooded?
Behemoth

Not in any dramatic way, just an overloaded gutter on a bay window.
Jamanda

That's good. Lots of dampness around at the moment.
Behemoth

Oh yes, busy, busy, busy and an Ofsted inspection on the side. I can't wait for our holiday.
Jamanda

Oh yes, busy, busy, busy and an Ofsted inspection on the side. I can't wait for our holiday.


Now? Jeeze! What do you do cancel sports day and trips so they can observe lessons?
Behemoth

No they just come along, so OH is being observed all day tommorrow in her capacity as class teacher, head of year group, whole school maths coordinator, SENCO and in the evening, end of year show which she's running.
       Downsizer Forum Index -> Finance and Property
Page 1 of 1
Home Home Home Home Home