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wellington womble

Stihl FS 95 C-E brushcutter

I am just about to buy one of these, unless anyone has heard awful things about it. The local dealer is a Stihl dealer, so I will have support and they have a good reputation for reliability. It is more than I wanted to spend, but I hear you get what you pay for.

Any views?
vegplot

Stihl are good quality. However, I would look at the Honda fours strokes as they're quieter, require less maintenance, last longer, and don't need a petrol/oil mix.

If you do get a 2 stroke (or 4-Mix as they call it) buy the best quality oil.
Nick

I've had both brands, and both are great.

My Stihl died in the fire, and I replaced it with an ancient Honda that had done nothing in my fil's shed for years. It started first time and runs without me having to mix fuel.

I'd take either, but the Honda is better (it's bigger, too).
Behemoth

The FS94 is a which best buy, not sure how they differ.
sean

By 1.
Treacodactyl

If you do get a 2 stroke (or 4-Mix as they call it) buy the best quality oil.


Or buy ready mixed long life 2-stroke petrol for it. Expensive but might be worth it.
wellington womble

By 1 idiot. I do in fact mean an FS94. Embarassed

I'd have to pay even more to get a Honda of equivalent power (they only do 1 hp or 1.6 hp. Nothing in between). I'd budgeted about 200, and am now up to 400, without helmet, harness, whatever it drinks and blades. I shouldn't need loads of power, as there should be limited initial clearance. I hope it won't need re-doing!

They do Honda as well, so I will look at those when I go to buy (Monday, weather permitting)
vegplot

By 1 idiot. I do in fact mean an FS94. Embarassed

I'd have to pay even more to get a Honda of equivalent power (they only do 1 hp or 1.6 hp. Nothing in between). I'd budgeted about 200, and am now up to 400, without helmet, harness, whatever it drinks and blades. I shouldn't need loads of power, as there should be limited initial clearance. I hope it won't need re-doing!

They do Honda as well, so I will look at those when I go to buy (Monday, weather permitting)


I've the Honda 425 1HP model. Had it for years. No problem with power and has dealt with everything that's been thrown at it. It has good torque which is more important than max power.
alison

We have the Stihl.

It is fine. No problems with it, and 14 years old, still going strong.
onemanband

........ I'd budgeted about 200, and am now up to 400..........

You know you could get that model 100 cheaper on-line ?
I appreciate that a local dealer will/has given you advice, but still, that's 100 you could save.
See if your local dealer will throw in some accessories or try to use accessories as a bargaining tool.
Behemoth

I thought Stihl didnt allow on-line sales. I'm after an fs40 so if I'm wrong would appreciate saving a few pennies. wellington womble

Looks like there are cheaper versions. Although they could never arrive for all I know.

Also, I believe there have been problems with fake Stihls online? No idea how you could tell.
wellington womble

Ah, they require a safety handover. So you need to pick them up or live within a stones throw of the cheaper dealer. wellington womble

But prices do vary between dealers. Swadlincote has it for almost 100 cheaper, and is only 13 miles away. Admittedly ibstock is only about 2 miles away, but I'll happily drive 30 miles to save 100! mousjoos

I bought my Stihl 12 years ago...still runs like new...little maintenance...don't leave them "dry" over winter, that's the advice I got when buying it, & that's all I do onemanband

...don't leave them "dry" over winter, that's the advice I got when buying it, & that's all I do

That's wrong. Or a typo ?
You should drain fuel before storing or it could evaporate leaving behind carb clogging goo.
That said, I generally don't drain mine unless I happen to run it dry before storing.
mousjoos

...don't leave them "dry" over winter, that's the advice I got when buying it, & that's all I do

That's wrong. Or a typo ?
You should drain fuel before storing or it could evaporate leaving behind carb clogging goo.
That said, I generally don't drain mine unless I happen to run it dry before storing.

I was told to leave a small amount of fuel in the machine as the membranes (wherever they are, carb I presume) dry out & crack

I've always done this & so far, no problems
onemanband

...don't leave them "dry" over winter, that's the advice I got when buying it, & that's all I do

That's wrong. Or a typo ?
You should drain fuel before storing or it could evaporate leaving behind carb clogging goo.
That said, I generally don't drain mine unless I happen to run it dry before storing.

I was told to leave a small amount of fuel in the machine as the membranes (wherever they are, carb I presume) dry out & crack

I've always done this & so far, no problems

Possibly makes sense.
OTOH carb gunking-up could happen over one storage and then require carb strip and clean.
Whereas diaphragm/gaskets perishing could take several years and would also mean carb strip.

?
mousjoos

...don't leave them "dry" over winter, that's the advice I got when buying it, & that's all I do

That's wrong. Or a typo ?
You should drain fuel before storing or it could evaporate leaving behind carb clogging goo.
That said, I generally don't drain mine unless I happen to run it dry before storing.

I was told to leave a small amount of fuel in the machine as the membranes (wherever they are, carb I presume) dry out & crack

I've always done this & so far, no problems



Possibly makes sense.
OTOH carb gunking-up could happen over one storage and then require carb strip and clean.
Whereas diaphragm/gaskets perishing could take several years and would also mean carb strip.

?

Not a clue...man in shop was adamant (at least according to his make-up...) that this should be done once machine was going to be stored for any length of time...I'm not enough of a mechanic to question his wisdom on this
onemanband


Not a clue...man in shop was adamant (at least according to his make-up...) that this should be done once machine was going to be stored for any length of time...I'm not enough of a mechanic to question his wisdom on this

Well I can say much the same - apart from my man in shop isn't a dandy highwayman.
mousjoos


Not a clue...man in shop was adamant (at least according to his make-up...) that this should be done once machine was going to be stored for any length of time...I'm not enough of a mechanic to question his wisdom on this

Well I can say much the same - apart from my man in shop isn't a dandy highwayman.

this is why it's so specialised
Mutton

We have a Stihl brushcutter, have had for a few years - might be that model. Its been very reliable but it has its limits.

For having a go at brambles, youngish gorse, smaller branches on gorse it is great. For bracken and especially reeds less so - gets tangled very fast. You also have to wear all the clobber. We now use scythes as much as we can - with a shorter, thicker brushcutting blade. They are better on bracken and reeds than the brushcutter, also no protecting gear or whitefinger off the vibrations.
wellington womble

Don't need to worry about reeds! It arrived on Friday, but I haven't had a chance to play with it yet. It didn't come with any fuel, anyway.

The handover consisted of 'there you go, luv'.
wellington womble

Works great, was to start and isn't too heavy. However, it requires Stihl (tm) Motomix to run on (according to the manual, anyway). What's that when it's at home, and what's it's generic name? I though it ran on petrol, that you bought from a garage. This appears to have been naive! sean

It'll be premixed two stroke fuel. wellington womble

Doesn't come out of a petrol pump, then? Bother. Why are things always more complicated than you thought?! sean

You can use petrol from a pump and mix it with the oil yourself. But if you're not going through gallons of it and want the convenience then the premixed stuff may make life simpler. Falstaff

oh Cum on !

It's 2 stroke you say ?

What mix are you wanting ? (Find that in the manual) - IF the manual is "use stihl stuff" - FIND it on a forum ! Mad

If you're stuffed use a 30 - 1 mix with 10-40 oil - But I'd really want to use the forums resources first ! Smile
wellington womble

I did. It does. I am.

If you can't be more polite, please refrain from commenting on my thread.
Treacodactyl

As has been said, it'll be a pre-mixed fuel. It'll be more expensive but it'll have a longer shelf life and should not contain some of the more harmful elements of pump fuel that can harm the seals of 2-stroke tools.

It should be available anywhere that sells Stihl tools, such as country stores or large garden centres.

I'd run it on the motomix at least a few times, probably until it's out of guarantee.
wellington womble

Thank you. I shall look less of an eejit in Higgots, now. I didn't know whether it was really necessary or not. Of course the manual says you need the branded stuff! dpack

branded fuels and lubricants are a bit more expensive,depending on how near your supplier is can be less convenient but have been tested for that machine.as mentioned perhaps a good idea during the gnt period or if you only use it a bit.

however both stihl and husky engines will run on a variety of moody fuels it might reduce the time between services and perhaps the life of the engine/tool head etc but if you consider a bloke wearing nowt but a pair of shorts in the middle of a jungle with a vintage saw he probably isnt using premixed "manufacturer"fuel but he will work all day every day and relies on his saw to do that .

it is important to get the 2 stroke mix right for that engine(see manual or online info) and to lubricate/clean various bits with the correct type of oil/methods.

ps be careful and use the ppe every time,even though brush cutters are fairly safe they can chuck rocks and the spray from some plants (see hogweed etc)can be quite nasty .if the thing tangles with brambles etc a few mins sharpening might help a lot.

that said they are very quick at( edit for missing)clearing weeds
alison

On one of our stihl things (not sure which one) we have a mixer bottle for the fuel. you put in unleaded and squirt in the correct measure of oil. onemanband

My FS55 died last week, so I bought an FS94 today, used it for 2 hours and the verdict is a big thumbs up.
I had no complaints about the '55, but the '94 is better......
quieter, lighter, better balanced, easier starting, wider handlebars with better off-set, feels easier and more precise to use.
The variable throttle dial seems a bit unnecessary - I'll probably tape it up on max setting so it doesn't inadvertently get moved. Or I might read the instructions and see what it's for Laughing

Re 2-stroke. I use the Stihl 'shots'. Yes, cost per litre they are expensive, but a 1 'shot' does a gallon of fuel - no thinking, no mess, no mistakes.

How you getting on with yours WW ?
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