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Bodger

Stumped. Bird ID please.If you can

This morning, we've had a bird in the garden that we've never had before feeding on the fat balls. Not only that, I don't recall ever having seen one before anywhere.
Normally, when there's a newcomer, I generally have a clue as to what it might be and go to the books or internet for confirmation but this time, I'm stumped. I haven't got a clue.
Sods law, I managed to jigger the camera up yesterday, so here goes with the best description that I can give.
The bird was sparrow sized but appeared to be more elongated. It didn't have a finches bill, it was quite long and pointed. At first glance we thought it to be a red poll but the cap wasn't right. It was uniform olive green in colour and extended towards the back of its neck.
The birds underneath was light solid grey in colour and its back had sparrow like markings. Its tail was quite short.
I pride myself in knowing the birds that come to our garden but this
one has me beaten. I'll know it if I can see a picture of it again, so can you help me out? Its definitely not one of your common or garden birds, or I'd know what it was.
dpack

considering the weather we have had it might be worth checking the usa id books
Colin & Jan

Garden warbler? I think there are a few beginning to move across from the Continent.

Chiff Chaff

Hen blackcap but they do have light brown head plumage
LynneA

Sounds like a warbler of some kind.

This Winter there have been more vagrants from the Americas mentioned on the birdwatching sites that from mainland Europe. Could easily be a waif or stray from the US or Canada.
dpack

a few years ago i saw what seemed to be a purple version of a blackbird .

i didnt get the camera in time and could not find it in the bird books or on line

a while later i was looking at a 1940's book which had a drawing of one ,purple blackbird from the usa last seen since the 1930's ,turns out mine might well be a fugee

i recon your birdy could well be a refugee from somewhere
Bodger

Garden warbler? I think there are a few beginning to move across from the Continent.

Chiff Chaff

Hen blackcap but they do have light brown head plumage


Definitely not the last two but I'll check out the garden warbler.
Bodger

Nope. not that one either.

https://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide/name/g/gardenwarbler/
alice

Siskin?
Bodger

No we have dozens of those Alice.
Piggyphile

Is it one of these?
http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/617/overview/Green-tailed_Towhee.aspx

This is a list of sparrow sized american things
http://www.whatbird.com/browse/objs/All/birds_na_147/59/Family/11107/Sparrows%20(Emberizidae)/default.aspx
Mr O

Re: Stumped. Bird ID please.If you can

This morning, we've had a bird in the garden that we've never had before feeding on the fat balls. Not only that, I don't recall ever having seen one before anywhere.
Normally, when there's a newcomer, I generally have a clue as to what it might be and go to the books or internet for confirmation but this time, I'm stumped. I haven't got a clue.
Sods law, I managed to jigger the camera up yesterday, so here goes with the best description that I can give.
The bird was sparrow sized but appeared to be more elongated. It didn't have a finches bill, it was quite long and pointed. At first glance we thought it to be a red poll but the cap wasn't right. It was uniform olive green in colour and extended towards the back of its neck.
The birds underneath was light solid grey in colour and its back had sparrow like markings. Its tail was quite short.
I pride myself in knowing the birds that come to our garden but this
one has me beaten. I'll know it if I can see a picture of it again, so can you help me out? Its definitely not one of your common or garden birds, or I'd know what it was.


Sounds like a female purple finch, but no one could tell without a picture.
buzzy

I suppose you have ruled out Dunnock? Apart from the olive green head, the rest fits.

Henry
Bodger

Definitely not Buzzy, we get quite a few of those but he's been back again today. The camera is still US and the picture that my wife has attempted to take on her mobile phone isn't very good. I'm pretty sure that its a warbler of some description but its the coloured cap that I can't find a match for. pollyanna

Linnet? pollyanna

Female blackcap has a red head. buzzy

Definitely not Buzzy, we get quite a few of those but he's been back again today. The camera is still US and the picture that my wife has attempted to take on her mobile phone isn't very good. I'm pretty sure that its a warbler of some description but its the coloured cap that I can't find a match for.

Even a "not very good" picture might give some clues!

Henry
LynneA

A couple of warblers reported as visting the West Midlands - maybe one of these fits the bill:

http://www.birdguides.com/species/species.asp?tx=1335

http://www.birdguides.com/species/species.asp?tx=1320
Colin & Jan

Bodger

Best thing to do is shoot it and then you can get a real close-up look at it Laughing

Said that once to a twitcher who saw the funny side when he realised I was joking.
dpack

Laughing buzzy

Bodger

Best thing to do is shoot it and then you can get a real close-up look at it Laughing

Said that once to a twitcher who saw the funny side when he realised I was joking.

As they used to say "What's hit's history, what's missed's mystery"

Henry
Mistress Rose

That used to be the way of identifying birds. Mentioned several times by Gilbert White in Natural History of Selborne. Not the modern method with photography, filming etc. but certainly expanded our knowledge of the natural world in the past. Nick

http://www.funtrivia.com/en/subtopics/Extinct-birds-100-unique-species-237143.html

Have a look for the word 'shot' on that page. Seems we are pretty good at shooting the last of a species, to check it really is.
dpack

there is good evidence that the large mammals of the americas went the same way once humans turned up

gone

so perhaps shooting it isnt a good idea cos there may be two of em Laughing
Mistress Rose

Not suggesting it is. In these days of cameras of all sorts it is totally unacceptable to shoot rare birds these days, as well as unnecessary.

Any more luck with the ID?
Bodger

The bad luck is that our usually reliable camera was Kaput on the tow days that the bird visited. Crying or Very sad The picture that Karen took with her mobile was like a speck on the horizon. Bodger

That bird? I managed to capture these pictures this morning when it popped in for some more fat ball. Not the best set of photos but I hope that they'll do.














Bodger

A member on another forum has quickly sorted it for me. I didn't realize that female Blackcaps didn't have black caps. Embarassed


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHKjpvJHUU0
Mistress Rose

Nothing exotic then, but nice to know and to have in the garden. They do it on purpose to fool us mere mortals you know. Laughing dpack

tis indeed a lady blackcap ,nice visitor and good to sort what it is Jamanda

Well she's a pretty little thing what ever she is. gythagirl

We had a male blackcap on our fat balls last week - the first we've ever seen in our garden. Haven't seen him again, or his missus.
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