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SteveP

Sycamore Problem

Maybe the subject should be 'problem sycamore'

I cut one down about two years ago and it insists on pollarding itself. Does anyone know how to kill the root without digging it out as it is mostly under concrete. I have tried spraying the new growth with roundup but that only kills the new shoots.

Steve
Treacodactyl

You can get treatments to kill stumps, often you drill holes in the stump, pour in the treatment and cover it. Google "stump killer" and don't forget to carefully follow the instructions.

Edit to add, I'll refrain from posting up another link to "Farming with Dynamite" Laughing
SteveP

Thanks for that. I will talk to the hardware store and get some. I should have tried google before posting.

Steve
Treacodactyl

There's some more ideas on this old thread: http://forum.downsizer.net/viewtopic.php?t=49582
dpack

copper roofing nails work well
12Bore

Can you still get copper sulphate crystals? Drill hole and fill with same?
dpack

not a clue dont see why not ,
gil

I also have a sycamore problem, though much of it is now rotation coppice.
RichardW

Keep cutting it.

It will die in the end.

Or dig it out.
gil

I'm tempted to try ring-barking my excess sycamores when the sap starts to rise. Do you think that would work ?
dpack

burns ok when dry
Treacodactyl

Sycamore burns very well when dry, and it dries quite quickly, but it isn't the densest of woods so doesn't last that long. Carves easily.

As for ring-barking, will it not just shoot from the stump from under the ring-barking?
RichardW

Yes & you will then in years to come have standing dead wood which whilst great for wildlife can be a bugger to deal with it there are any "targets" in its branch drop zone or worse in its uncontrolled felling zone.

PS

I love sycamore as a firewood. As has been said it cuts easy, splits easy & dries quick. You do have to watch for it getting full of mould if left on the ground or cut at the wrong time.
Tavascarow

I like it as a wood.
Fast growing, many uses as a timber as well as fuel.
Reasonably straight grained & not too knotty.
Leaves break down to humus fast unlike oak & beech so good for the understorey.
When I first started harvesting it I wanted to get rid & replant with ash & oak, now I just accept that without chemical poison I wont get rid, so just keep the bigger smaller & plant around them.
gil

I love sycamore as a firewood. As has been said it cuts easy, splits easy & dries quick. You do have to watch for it getting full of mould if left on the ground or cut at the wrong time.


I like it too, but you can have too many of them.
I've noticed it moulding - what time of year would you recommend cutting to avoid this ?
Tavascarow

It's also an excellent nectar source for honey bees.
Makes a mild light honey.
RichardW

Ah yes, dont park under a sycamore cos they drool/dribble like mad. I wonder if sycamore will make a good maple syrup as it is from the same family.

Shake a branch & watch the insects fly.
RichardW



I like it too, but you can have too many of them.
I've noticed it moulding - what time of year would you recommend cutting to avoid this ?


I cant remember lol. I think its when the sap is down which make sense as there would be less sweet food for the mould.

I cleared a patch last year. This year about 20 new ones came up per m2. Compared to about 10 other tree types in the complete area of about 400m2
vegplot

We're cutting some this year for firewood. Bit of a weed tree but excellent fuel and seasons so quickly. Shane

My two pet hates with sycamores are the aforementioned dribbling (all over the car and windows in our case) and the weekend after weekend that you have to spend pulling hundreds of saplings out of the garden.

Mind you, I've recently decided that I prefer that to no trees whatsoever Laughing
Tavascarow

I wonder if sycamore will make a good maple syrup as it is from the same family.


I'm sure I've read that it can be tapped like maple & birch but I don't think it's as high in sugars as either.
Probably better for wine or beer instead of syrup.
Treacodactyl

25g of sugar per litre according to notes in PFAF.

I know it self seeds freely, just like ash, but there's none on our woodland despite neighbouring trees. I think the deer must keep all the seedlings down.
Shane

I know it self seeds freely, just like ash, but there's none on our woodland despite neighbouring trees. I think the deer must keep all the seedlings down. Someone once told me that the fast-growing, highly-fertile trees like sycamore tend to be found on the outskirts of woodland. They are the trees that allow the wood to colonise more land, and other, slower growing trees follow in their wake. Never looked into the truth of it, but it might explain why you're not finding any in your wood. gil

I wonder if sycamore will make a good maple syrup as it is from the same family.


I'm sure I've read that it can be tapped like maple & birch but I don't think it's as high in sugars as either.
Probably better for wine or beer instead of syrup.

Yes, lower sugar content even than birch sap. I did make wine with sycamore sap one year, and it was OK, quite like birch but more woody.
Treacodactyl

I know it self seeds freely, just like ash, but there's none on our woodland despite neighbouring trees. I think the deer must keep all the seedlings down. Someone once told me that the fast-growing, highly-fertile trees like sycamore tend to be found on the outskirts of woodland. They are the trees that allow the wood to colonise more land, and other, slower growing trees follow in their wake. Never looked into the truth of it, but it might explain why you're not finding any in your wood.

Yes, it's a pioneer species so it can be good for establishing new woodland although in can also exclude out other trees. I have a mix of newly planted and old woodland so would have expected the odd seedling. Along with deer though we have a large number of voles which I expect eat quite a few seeds.

Just curious really, apart from blackthorn and gorse there's not much natural regeneration in our woodland.
tahir

Just curious really, apart from blackthorn and gorse there's not much natural regeneration in our woodland.

We've got maple, birch and blackthorn but all the natural regeneration seems to be self seeded oak and ash, mostly oak
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