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dpack

tales of the riverbank

this isnt nc so behave

but i like beaver

i can think of quite a few places where they would be perfect for river flow management ,a new hat might be nice and allegedly they are quite edible
Mutton

Well, wow. Not often something makes a comeback.

On the other hand, if I owned trees at the riverbank I might be peeved, plus what about flooding up stream from the dams they build?
Jamanda

I've been following this for months, and I think even signed a petition asking for them to be allowed to stay where they are. I think it's great!

I'd have like the post to have been about Hammy et al though.
dpack

hammy et al were charming but these wee critters could be back in the uk rather than on dvd.
as they were native and fairly widespread until the norman conquest (last english about 1250 ,last scotish about 1600)they could be counted as british native and reintroduced (like kites etc ).

im quite serious about thinking that they could be a very useful part of flow management in some places and although they do geo engineer eagerly the environment they create has merit both in flora and fauna terms that could more than offset the loss of damp places to wet ones and trees a bit further up the slopes and coppiced by tooth can be usefully productive for beast and folk .

i can think of a few places that they would be a huge asset (and cute and tasty and cosy to wear if there are lots).
Mistress Rose

While they can cause localised flooding, which isn't helpful if your land is in a flooded bit, there are certainly some schemes to slow down rivers by allowing catches to form so there is less spate during high rainfall periods down stream.

A certain volunteer in our woods left the trees he cut with a machete looking like that, and then he went to Devon for a while. Unless the beavers have been actually sighted, has he made a return? Laughing The area he coppiced in our woods is now known as Beaver Acre, and we don't have any streams or even ponds near us. He did a brilliant job for us, and we just tidied up after him with a chainsaw.
buzzy

hammy et al were charming but these wee critters could be back in the uk rather than on dvd.
as they were native and fairly widespread until the norman conquest (last english about 1250 ,last scotish about 1600)they could be counted as british native and reintroduced (like kites etc ).

.......................................................................


Did you know that when filming of Tales of the River Bank had finished, Hammy and his pals escaped (or were released) and tried to set up home on the Isle of Wight?

Henry
Mistress Rose

Didn't know it was filmed there. I remember it well, but didn't like it quite as much as the programmes it replaced like the Flower Pot Men.
VM

...as they were native and fairly widespread until the norman conquest (last english about 1250 ,last scotish about 1600)they could be counted as british native and reintroduced (like kites etc ).


How do we know they died out in 1250 or thereabouts? Just interested. Assume they weren't already worrying about species extinction back then?
dpack

the dates come from contemporary accounts of the last ones available to be made into hats.

a bit like the last wolf in yorkshire etc etc
dpack

ps i recon the last to be caught etc has often been the one best remembered dpack

some of these tales are invented ,some are based on misunderstood place names ,transposed historical events and such twisty tale things

most last sighting records are based on old bob (or whoever)saying the last one caught round here was when he was a kid to a diarist or historian or whatever .other dates are from the last time a tax or bounty was paid and recorded in the manor rolls or similar documentation.
Mistress Rose

They may well be right to within a generation then, but not much more accurate than that.

It is interesting to speculate on whether some things really did die out or whether they retreated from where men lived so weren't seen.

There are a lot of animals living currently in the UK that are 'officially' not there. Wild boar were a serious case in point for some years, but I think it has been accepted now that they are there. Officially they weren't as the rifles needed to shoot them were the sort of thing that makes officialdom have forty fits. We are sure there is at least one big cat living along the South Downs, and a swamp cat was found killed on the road in this area a few years ago. All of these animals would almost certainly have come from escapes or people letting the animal into the wild on purpose, rather than them living quietly for centuries in the area.
Treacodactyl

I don't think there was every a problem with people owning boar legal rifles, after all .308s are widely owned and one of the most common calibres used on deer. I just think it's taken the various government depts many years to research and decide what to do with the boar. Mistress Rose

I have heard of people who have been refused the licence for the heavier bore rifles because officially there were no wild boar in their area, in spite of there having been several sightings and even dangerous encounters with hikers. Treacodactyl

I don't doubt various police forces would have come up with various excuses as firearms licensing has been a bit of a mess for years. However, it would have been fairly easy to get a .308 for deer or target shooting, if you have somewhere to use it, but much harder for boar if they aren't recognised to be a target species. Forces often insisted on listing target species as well which again may have caused problems. These days it should be easier.
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