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Bulgarianlily

Use less stuff year 2010

I am thinking about how to make 2010 a year in which I simply buy / use less stuff. In other words, to make it a 'useless' year Laughing

All the good intentions seem to focus on recycling and carbon emissions, but very few of the campaigns seem to look at the easiest solution (maybe), just don't buy it. The trouble is that everywhere you go the world is full of new shiny stuff, so how can I set some helpful ground rules to keep my purse in my pocket?

Thoughts so far, to try to and not buy anything that isn't made -
a) locally, failing that -
b) within my country of residence, failing that -
c) within Europe.

I am hoping that the extra time working out where everything is made will give me a moment of reflection to think 'do I really need this?'. It is a bit like reducing my 'BMI' but making it stand for Buying Mass Impulse, as on the whole a lot of our cash goes on impulse, not in carefully thought out purchases.
Mrs R

I'm already *very* good at not buying things. What helped me was having no money. So, simply give your spare money to me, and I will invest it in cattle for you Cool
Bulgarianlily

Only if you promise to ride them out to Bulgaria
Jo S

Ixy wrote:
I'm already *very* good at not buying things. What helped me was having no money. So, simply give your spare money to me, and I will invest it in cattle for you Cool


I was going to say the same thing, just substitute cattle for pigs Very Happy
gil

Re: Use less stuff year 2010

Bulgarianlily wrote:
The trouble is that everywhere you go the world is full of new shiny stuff, so how can I set some helpful ground rules to keep my purse in my pocket?

a moment of reflection to think 'do I really need this?'.


Stay away from shops
Develop an aversion to new shiny stuff

Think up reasons in advance why you don't 'really need this', such as
I've already got one
The old one can be repaired / hasn't worn out yet
I've already got something like it
How many times would I really use it ?
Is it worth the money ?
Take food and drink with you so you don't need to buy snacks enroute
Mrs R

Bulgarianlily wrote:
Only if you promise to ride them out to Bulgaria


too easy!

I shall expect the money in my account by morning Cool Laughing
chicken feed

Very Happy a friend of mine once told me on a shopping trip the best way to decide if your going to buy someting is to work out its true value say you work for 7.50 an hour and a new jumper costs 37.50 is it worth 5 hours work Question it makes you look at things in a different light.
boisdevie1

A period of enforced poverty is a great way of getting used to not buying stuff. Here are some ideas:

1. For books, magazines, music and film use your local library.
2. Charity shops are ace for clothes.
3. Take picnics when you are away from home.
4. Cheap holidays - camping.
5. Freecycle.
6. If you don't have a big big garden grow stuff that's expensive to buy - herbs, spices, garlic etc.
7. For Xmas and Birthday ask for 'useful' presents. This year I'm getting a genuine swiss army knife.
8. Keep a list of supermarket prices - I was surprised to find that flour in Sainsbury's was cheaper than Aldi in France.
Mutton

Develop a keen eye for re-use of "rubbish".

Plastic milk bottles when cut up in different ways=
Plant labels, useful pots, plant watering pots, plant growing pots, draught seal flap strips around the door of your greenhouse, something to keep the corrugated iron roofing sheets from touching the tanellised timber which will rust it, watering cans.

Keep the plastic cup from the water cooler - seedling pot/seedling cover if transparent.

Eye up neighbour's rubbish and ask nicely to take away the towel rail/timber offcuts/useful cardboard for lining the floor of the duck hut etc.

Re-use the large size yoghurt/soup pot/margarine tub as a freezer container.

Be shameless - embarrass your family with all the useful tat you can acquire. Get your neighbour whistling Steptoe and Sons theme music at you - then you will really be on a roll. Very Happy
Bebo

chicken feed wrote:
Very Happy a friend of mine once told me on a shopping trip the best way to decide if your going to buy someting is to work out its true value say you work for 7.50 an hour and a new jumper costs 37.50 is it worth 5 hours work Question it makes you look at things in a different light.


That can work against you as well though. I'm a rubbish knitter so it would take me two solid days of knitting to make a pair of socks. Even on minimum wage I would earn a lot more in two days than it would cost to buy a pair of socks.

If you have a particular profession and can potentially earn considerably more than the minimum wage in theory it would be pointless to spend a couple of hours chopping up veg and making your own chutney as in two hours you could earn enough to buy double (or more) the amount that you have made. It's a point that has been put to me on numerous occassions by various people I know, but it doesn't stop me making my own chutney. Wink
gardening-girl

:You knit fast Bebo. I,m more likely to take two weeks.
Bebo

gardening-girl wrote:
:You knit fast Bebo. I,m more likely to take two weeks.


The two days was based on me knitting constantly for the entire day and evening and doing nothing else (apart from the odd meal break). Even that was probably an under-estimate of the time needed Laughing
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