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fish (the other one)

Wartime rosehip syrup.



This week we have been very busy harvesting rosehips for our store cupboard,Rosehips dont keep long unless dried properly,by far the easiest method of preserving is to make a syrup of them,we have manges around 15 pints so far with plenty more to do.
During the world war they were harvested by the tonnes from the English hedgerows. A s citrus fruits were off the menu for the war years vitamin c had to be found and believe it or not the humble rosehip was the answer and yielded more vitamin c than oranges!
Rosehip syrup is great as cordial,drizzled over pancakes or just by the spoon full as a tonic.
Here is the recipe that i use as did my mother and grandmother during the war years:

Pick 3 lb of rose hips,ideally after the first Autumn frost,wash and then mince with a coarse mincer add to your pan and pour 4 pints of boiling water over them,bring to the boil then let stand for twenty minutes.
Next pour into a some fine muslin or pillow case and allow to drip until the bulk of the liquid has come through,then return the residue of the hips to the saucepan, add one and a half pints of boiling water, stir and allow to stand for 10 minutes.
Pour back into the jelly bag and allow to drip through. To make sure all the sharp hairs are removed, put back the first half cupful of liquid and allow to drip through again. Put the mixed juice into a clean saucepan and boil down until the juice measures about one and a half pints, then add one and a quarter pounds of sugar and boil for a further 5 minutes. Pour into hot sterile bottles and seal at once,if using corks scald them and seal with paraffin wax.

The Hedgerow Harvest, Ministry of Food , 1943

thanks for looking.
dpack

nice post

tis good stuff ,in hot water with a wee nip tis a proper tonic
T.G

Ooo Now this is timely I was looking at the hips midweek and thinking I ought to make a syrup, thank you Very Happy
Green Rosie

Just come in from picking some Wink . I swear by rosehip syrup; the first sniffle I feel add a good glug to boiling water with the juice of half a lemon and imbibe.
DawnMK

might be picking some tomorrow thank you Very Happy
DawnMK

Thanks for the post got mine done today



might get some more done during the week Very Happy
fish (the other one)

looking good there dawn.one thing my mum used to do to make it a better colour was to add a chunk of beetroot to colour it then take it out,doesnt leave any taste but makes it redder.
Green Rosie

I actually prefer the paler one, perhaps because that is the only colour I have ever made.
DawnMK

think it also depends on your hips, they are suppose to better after a good frost,
it tastes good Very Happy
fish (the other one)

There is an interesting fact about vit c which I seem to remember reading was discovered when they tested batches of syrup made by schools during war. We all know vit c is destroyed by heat and folk used to think that the longer you cooked something the more vit c you would loose, but you need to get the hips soft which takes a while. What they found was that once at a boil it didn't affect vit c content if you boiled long or short. The time it denatures is on the way up and on the way down so as the recipe says pour boiling water on em don't put in cold and bring the water up to boil. Same goes for potatoes dropping them into boiling water preserves the vit c.
sgt.colon

We'll be making this for the first time this year. I'm looking forward to finding out what it is like.
Green Rosie

think it also depends on your hips, they are suppose to better after a good frost,
it tastes good Very Happy


In that case could you freeze the hips and make the syrup later?
pookie

sounds like a plan! Wink
DawnMK

now why didn I think of that, the point of the frost is it softens the berries making it easier to exctract there goodness, so I supppose poppin them in the freezer would have the same effect Very Happy
Nick

Works on sloes for gin.
dpack

vit c oxidises it isnt denatured by heat as such

heat increases the rate of oxidation

but

steam prevents air getting into the pan /max concentration of o2 in solution drops with temp (reduced by half for every ten c rise ,roughly iirc )

therefore a fast boil = low oxidation

pressure cooker is best
Azura Skye

never tried syrup - but I love the jam. It's very popular in Germany - it's called Hagenbutter Marmalade.
I've picked 3 kg so far and will make jam and tea out of them.
Sally Too

vit c oxidises it isnt denatured by heat as such

heat increases the rate of oxidation

but

steam prevents air getting into the pan /max concentration of o2 in solution drops with temp (reduced by half for every ten c rise ,roughly iirc )

therefore a fast boil = low oxidation

pressure cooker is best


Thanks for that... I was trying to figure out the "why" of that! Makes more sense now. Cool
Claire70

Can I slightly hijack this thread and ask you good people a question? I'm currently in the middle of making my first batch of rosehip jelly. I've cooked the rosehips and they're currently straining - but it seems to be taking HOURS!!!! I think I'm getting one drip per 10 minutes. Am I really going to have more than a very small puddle in the bottom of the bowl by the time I wake up tomorrow? Or have I done something horribly wrong? NorthernMonkeyGirl

I left mine hanging overnight and squidged some more out in the morning Smile fish (the other one)

sounds like you had too little liquid in it. Claire70

But how do you know how much liquid to put in? The recipe said to just cover the rosehips with water, then keep topping up to stop it boiling dry. So that's what I did - by the time they were cooked, it was more mush than anything, not much liquid at all.

Anyway, along with the apples, I now have a small bowlful... Not that much but it might make 1 pot of jam!
fish (the other one)

have it the consistency of tomato soup. Claire70

have it the consistency of tomato soup.

Ah, that's a good tip. Thanks!
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