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Bugs

Washing a waxed jacket?

I've been given an old Barbour which is perfectly wearable but smells very musty (partly my fault for leaving it hung up untouched for about a year).

I'd like to use it but I can't bear the dusty, musty smell, and although it's hanging on the line now to see if the rain can work on it, I would like to try wash it.

I *think* I can do this on a cold machine wash, with no detergent, and if necessary I could then get a tub of reproofing stuff?

Or would I be better off buying some special washy stuff - does such a thing exist? Has anyone done this and if so, can you advise what to do (or what to avoid?)?
sally_in_wales

I'm pretty sure Nikwax do a detergent that will wash proofed things
gz

As far as I remember, they are supposed to be wipe down only.
Having said that I always gave ours a cold wash with a little detergent, then dried them in front of the Rayburn and re-waxed when they were still warm and dry. Smile
wellington womble

I vaguely recall having to send ours to the dry cleaners. But only vaguely, and that could have been wrong even then.
Bugs

gz wrote:
As far as I remember, they are supposed to be wipe down only.
Having said that I always gave ours a cold wash with a little detergent, then dried them in front of the Rayburn and re-waxed when they were still warm and dry. Smile


Ah yes, upon reading more carefully I think the ones that can easily go in the machine are the modern waterproofs. I have now read of people hosing them down in the summer, which might work, or as you say sponging them.

I've looked up Sally's suggestion of Nikwax, and their product chooser does direct me to something called Tech Wash, which isn't too expensive. I can't find if anyone has used it though, I'll have to have a look next time we are in Scats or somewhere similar. I don't mind buying a couple of products in this instance as it might mean I wind up with a coat significantly better than any I would be likely to lay money out for...

Does the wax smell nice I wonder drunken
Bernie66

Probably better than musty but the right herbs or and spices left in the pockets as it dries wiil enhance any smell..............
12Bore

We washed a wax years ago - and ruined it.
They can be re-waxed easily enough, they're supposed to stink though, aren't they?
alison

Mole Valley Farmers do a reproofing service, which may do, if you machine wash first.
wellington womble

I think techwash is for modern waterproofs (it was we use for ours) I know you can get them re-waxed, but I suspect it's not a home process. You could ask a dry cleaner or the rewax people whether you can wash it first (would the wax do un-fixable things to your washing machine, though?)
judith

Barbours do smell a bit musty at the best of times. Or at least mine does.
I have never washed mine, but I don't imagine it would be the end of the world if you did wash it. But do expect to spend a pleasant evening by the fire with the pot of wax re-proofing it.
And it might not smell any less musty though. Very Happy
random

I'm not sure if it's the same for Barbour but I always use this to reproof my Drizabone

http://www.drizaboneclothing.co.uk/store/Driza-Bone_Oilskin_Reproofer_Pump_Spray.html

It also comes in a tin that you can paint on.

Both methods work really well and can easily be done at home.

They also do a detergent for the washing of oilskins

http://www.drizaboneclothing.co.uk/store/Driza-Bone_Oilskin___Wool_Detergent.html
judith

Have just dug out my tin of stuff. Barbour Thornproof Dressing is what you want. According to the tin, you should sponge down the coat with clean, cold water only - don't use soap or detergent.
Sadly the smell is nothing to write home about.
yummersetter

whilst we have Barbour experts around, does anyone know how to deal with a misaligned zip? It works up and down but not down enough, by 1 'cog', to come apart.
12Bore

judith wrote:
Have just dug out my tin of stuff. Barbour Thornproof Dressing is what you want. According to the tin, you should sponge down the coat with clean, cold water only - don't use soap or detergent.
Sadly the smell is nothing to write home about.

Must be just me, I love the smell of a freshly waxed jacket, mind you, I enjoy bulling shoes and boots....... Neutral
Bugs

Thanks comrades...I should say it didn't smell anything like as bad when I hung it up a year or so ago (it was slightly smoky you see...dating from before my SIL gave up).

On reflecting it looks like a sponging down with ice water followed by potentially a hose down is the first step, and see how it goes from there. I could probably do the coat at the same time.

Yummersetter, in my travels I found Barbour seems quite keen on repairing stuff, it might be worth attempting to speak to them in case they can either advise or might offer to repair if it has always been like that.
yummersetter

thanks - but I must just check first that it's a real Barbour or generic! It only recently slipped.

It came from one of the Sherborne charity shops, like most of my wax jackets. That is a classic Barbour Town. And I've never washed one, just wiped off the worst of the dogspit and mud and reproofed the dry looking patches, the wax overwhelms every smell. I like a good solid patina on a wax jacket. The pockets are usually the first casualty on mine, keys, fossils and dog leads soon wear a hole in them and drop down into the lining.
judith

It isn't cheap having repairs done - I had to have my cuffs replaced a few years ago. They did a grand job, but it cost something like £45 to have it done. Cheap compared to the cost of replacing the coat, and I expect many more years of service from it, but there was a sharp intake of breath at the time.
Belinda

I have a 20-year-old Barbour. You can send any Barbour back to the Barbour people to be repaired/reproofed (they'll do patches, mend slits etc as well as reproofing) but the state of the coast after 20 years meant that a new one would actually have been cheaper than the combined cost of a great many small repairs. I just put a bit of wax on occasionally, or not as the mood takes me. It's still lovely and warm in really cold weather.
Mutton

We have SCATS Barbour copies. What we've found is that the waterproofing wears off over several years and they start to leak.
Then we wash them with ordinary clothes powder at 40C, and when dry, re-proof them. We used to use a water based green coloured wax liquid we bought from the local shoe menders (it was meant for coats not shoes Smile ) But we found we were spending best part of £10 per coat on coats that cost £10 each in the sale.
Now we use a bit of Ducks Back silicone liquid (I think that is the name, its out in a shed and I'm not going out to look Smile ) Anyway, bought in a DIY place and it does brick, stone, fabric etc. The trick being to get it spread out nicely over the coat, not so much it soaks through to the lining, little enough at a time it doesn't run off the edges. That does fine. (Note to self, need to re-proof the clean coats again.....)
Bugs

Thanks for that Mutton - on reflection, it will still be a useful coat even if I somehow ruin its waterproofness, so I think I will try progressive treatments - giving it a sponge down will help to start off with anyway, and once I get the worst of the dusty smell off it I can try perfuming it a bit.
Gervase

I've found with Barbours that putting them in a bath of cold water and giving them a going over with a scrubbing brush works wonders (you'll be amazed at how filthy the water gets). Take it outside, hose it down and let it dry, then reproof with the wax you get in the tins - stand the tin in a pan of hot water for half an hour beforehand, rub it in well with an old dishcloth wrapped around your fingers and use a hair-dryer to make sure it sinks in evenly. It'll never be quite as pristine as a new Barbour, but who wants that?
If it's simply smelling, hanging it up outside in the wind and sun for a day or so will go a long way to curing that - it managed to get rid of the smell of a hob ferret that, for some weeks, had guaranteed me a lot of personal space on the Underground.
butlerman

Re-proofing Wax Jacket

A wax jacket can be washed in cold water, but not with detergent. The problem doing it yourself is the applying a fresh coat of wax and ensuring it is water-proof, which can be a very tedious proceedure.

After a time these jackets can be become very smelly, many get fogotten for years in dark damp garages. If cleaned properly they look as good as new. I run a business that specialises in the cleaning of wax and leathers http://www.butlerz.co.uk/Wax_Jacket_Cleaning.htm and we see a lot waxed garments which have been retrieved from a garage or cellar at which point the customer thinks they are beyond redemption. A wax jacket will last for years if it is regularly cleaned and re-waxed. Rather like servicing your annually, it costs a bit but keeps the car running for years.
juliagoolia367

Maybe someone could help me? Ö
Itís not so much the smell of the Barbour itís the marks its putting on my car seats thatís bothering me! Sad

Anybody else had this problem?
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! Laughing

thank you!
Bebo

The marks are probably down to the wax on it rather than it being dirty. Not much you can do about that other than chucking an old blanket over the seat.
Mithril

Re: Re-proofing Wax Jacket

A wax jacket can be washed in cold water, but not with detergent.


I wish I'd known this - I've been replacing them every 15 - 20 years. Wink One of them would have gone on a lot longer but the smell of ferret just got too much, even for me Laughing Mind you I'm not sure cold water would have cut it.
Scotiadave

Does anyone know whether Barbours can get so dried out so far that they wonít absorb the wax dressing any more?

I was delighted to find a chocolate-brown Barbour Bedale in my favourite charity shop for £15. Structurally itís in good nick, no holes or signs of excessive wear, even has the Barbour badge still pinned on the collar, hurrah! Problem is it doesnít have that waxy feel, and it just smells of that special sweetish charity-shop odour you donít seem to get anywhere else. Also, it weighs about 8oz less than my venerable navy one. And finally, itís got very dark, black patches around the hand-warmer pocket areas on both sides

So, do I invest £10 of my hard-earned, plus some time in a warm room giving it the hot wax treatment with the Barbour Thornproof, or am I likely to end up with a sodden, dripping oily thing because itís lost itís absorbent properties?

My goodness Iíve rambled on, thanks for any advice!
Nick

No idea. But, try a small patch, and you'll find out soon enough. Seems unlikely that it'll become wax proof, tho.
gleefulgoat

Re: Re-proofing Wax Jacket

We used to use our old ones for re roofing the chicken and duck sheds when they had their day Laughing
dpack

wash and rewax is a time greedy but easy job

a quick spray of nutradol will fix most smells
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