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dpack

wasps MWEEEP

HUGE linky

Shocked Cool
Mistress Rose

Luckily wasps usually inhabit a nest for only one year. That is a huge one, although I think one I saw on a cable drum many years ago when I was working was in excess of 2' across. The tunnel is particularly interesting.
Woo

I saw this on FB.
that would give you a freight when you went up for the decorations in December! Shocked Shocked Shocked
Lorrainelovesplants

Oh my God- that would absolutely freak me!
dpack

rugby ball size is the biggest i have found, with that one it was full of very cross wasps and about a third of it attached to the roof tile in my hand. nowt wrong with a 15 ft jump to safety off a kitchen extension Rolling Eyes
Woo

rugby ball size is the biggest i have found, with that one it was full of very cross wasps and about a third of it attached to the roof tile in my hand. nowt wrong with a 15 ft jump to safety off a kitchen extension Rolling Eyes


something similar happened here while himself was up a ladder moving the ridge tiles.
he returned with a blow torch and a tennis racket zapper. foolish boy... Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes
Slim

We had one almost that large on the front of my house growing up. Bald-faced hornets. Nasty buggers. We got rid of it on year 3 as they started stinging us with no provocation (I'm thinking they got big enough that they felt they had a bigger territory to defend)


A year or two later a hive of ground wasps that had burrowed in right next to the foundation got scooped out and eaten up by a bear. It was good work by the bear as we hadn't managed an easy way to get rid of the nest up until then (previously tried flooding, even spray!)
Mistress Rose

The badgers in our woods tend to go for bumble bees nests. One year some hornets built their nest in a fallen tree quite close to the ground, and by the evidence, a badger went for that one. No idea who won on that encounter, but must have given the badger a shock.
Behemoth

I found an old one in the roof when renovating. About the size of a beach ball, so relatively big then. After we finished they set up iMessage again and At night I could here them munching. Ptobably turning my insulation into nest.
Nick

I found an old one in the roof when renovating. About the size of a beach ball, so relatively big then. After we finished they set up iMessage again and At night I could here them munching. Ptobably turning my insulation into nest.


Smart wasps. Did they Facetime, too?
vegplot

We had one almost that large on the front of my house growing up. Bald-faced hornets. Nasty buggers. We got rid of it on year 3 as they started stinging us with no provocation (I'm thinking they got big enough that they felt they had a bigger territory to defend)


A year or two later a hive of ground wasps that had burrowed in right next to the foundation got scooped out and eaten up by a bear. It was good work by the bear as we hadn't managed an easy way to get rid of the nest up until then (previously tried flooding, even spray!)

Our animal arsenal is paltry by comparison. One mildly poisonous snake the occasional hornet, clegs, and midges are about all we can muster.
Behemoth

I found an old one in the roof when renovating. About the size of a beach ball, so relatively big then. After we finished they set up iMessage again and At night I could here them munching. Ptobably turning my insulation into nest.

Smart wasps. Did they Facetime, too?

Hahaha, no idea how that got in there. Laughing
Slim

We had one almost that large on the front of my house growing up. Bald-faced hornets. Nasty buggers. We got rid of it on year 3 as they started stinging us with no provocation (I'm thinking they got big enough that they felt they had a bigger territory to defend)


A year or two later a hive of ground wasps that had burrowed in right next to the foundation got scooped out and eaten up by a bear. It was good work by the bear as we hadn't managed an easy way to get rid of the nest up until then (previously tried flooding, even spray!)

Our animal arsenal is paltry by comparison. One mildly poisonous snake the occasional hornet, clegs, and midges are about all we can muster.

We have a poisonous snake species, but it's incredibly endangered and locations in a small ridge area are kept fairly secret to try to give them a chance at surviving. I don't know anyone that has seen one. Other than that, no poisonous spiders. Biggest concerns are Lyme's disease from ticks, and triple E or west nile from mosquito bites (rarely a threat to humans).

Bears are big, but we only have black bears, so they're a lot like big lazy woodland dogs. There are occasionally individuals that get too used to humans and need to be put down, but it's usually humans fault for leaving out greasy trash, or leaving bird feeders up past hibernation season.

A good relevant story to go with this: http://www.wcax.com/story/17409406/gov-shumlin-chased-by-bears-in-backyard

Bobcats, mountain lions, coyotes, and fishers don't bother people much, but they do occasionally eat housecats. Coyotes are probably the most visible, and definitely the most audible. They typically fear people, though there was one very surprising incident where they killed a young woman in Canada: http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/Music/10/29/canada.singer.killed/

Really if you were to visit our woods the only warnings you would get would be about black fly season in the early spring (nasty buggers) and mosquitoes in general, and to watch for hunters during bear and buck season.

Does poison ivy grow in the UK? I guess that could be considered a nasty, though I don't react to it.
Behemoth

I visited the Shenandoah Valley at Easter. Although we didn't see a bear we found enough evidence of them in the woods to confirm the old adage. dpack

empty picnic baskets? Slim

empty picnic baskets?

I believe you mean "pic-a-nic baskets"
dpack

indeed i do Nick

indeed i do

I think you mean a matabooboo.
Mistress Rose

Lyme disease is a risk in the UK too Slim, but luckily we don't have poison ivy, bears or the other creatures you have. Adders are our only poisonous snake, although a grass snake bite needs urgent treatment, not for venom, but for infection. Jam Lady

Coyotes, yes. Infrequent black bear. Copperhead snakes not too far away from here. Skunks dig out yellow jacket ground nests.

Really hope the PC / mouse interface gets fixed soon. This vintage XP laptop is so not what I'm used to using.
dpack

our most dangerous wild critters either cause car crashes (deer hurt a few hundred folk a year and kill a few ) or kill folk with allergies to them like bees and wasps.
our toxic spiders can give quite a nasty reaction to their venom ,afaik no fatalities recently but a few folk have spent a while in hospital . we have a few bitey natives and some exotics among those.
a couple of years back i was nipped by an unidentified grassland spider which made my hand double in size for a couple of days .
we have a few nasty fish such as the weaver but it is rarely fatal and quite a few that give a very painful stab with spines that have various toxic bonuses to the spikey aspect if you mishandle them.
conger eel can be a bit scarey up close and personal but unless you fish for them they are unlikely to be a problem , if you do a claw hammer is a handy bit of kit.



among the plants we have some stars of deception and toxicity , some of the water umbelifers are very special, foragers are quite rare and usually quite clued up about such things. if i was looking for toxins the flora of the uk (and its gardens) would be an ace place to seek such things.

we dont have poison ivy ,sumac or oak but we do have giant hogweed which is pretty nasty. nettles are annoying but not very dangerous
Jam Lady

We have nettles here also. And giant hogweed is listed as a dangerous, noxious weed to be destroyed when noticed. Many of "your" plants happily make themselves at home - garlic mustard, anyone? Japanese plants are worse - kudzu (the vine that ate the South), Japanese honeysuckle, Japanese stilt grass. Multiflora rose. Phragmites. Japanese knotweed. I'm getting depressed, better stop. Woo

I think mother nature is pretty awesome at defending herself.

but for pure entertainment value I declare Slim and his front garden bear eating the nest the winner... Cool
Jam Lady



Deer looking in kitchen window. Perhaps waiting for coffee to go with salad bar / garden?
Woo

how lovely! Mistress Rose

Nice picture of the deer Jam Lady. I am glad to say that the deer stay in the woods and we only tend to get things like foxes in the garden. They seem able to climb over the garden wall quite easily. One year a vixen reared her cubs in the buddliah bed and the little pests played football with my onion sets. Slim

Slim and his front garden bear eating the nest...

If you think that's good, there was a bear in that same area (same bear?) that I discovered had followed me through the snow.
I came back to the spot I walked my dog through the woods the next day and found big ole paw prints nestled right in my snowshoe tracks for a length of our walk, crystalized enough when I found them that the bear was probably going through within an hour or two after I had (before the nighttime cold).
Woo

Slim and his front garden bear eating the nest...

If you think that's good, there was a bear in that same area (same bear?) that I discovered had followed me through the snow.
I came back to the spot I walked my dog through the woods the next day and found big ole paw prints nestled right in my snowshoe tracks for a length of our walk, crystalized enough when I found them that the bear was probably going through within an hour or two after I had (before the nighttime cold).


Shocked Cool
buzzy

Slim and his front garden bear eating the nest...

If you think that's good, there was a bear in that same area (same bear?) that I discovered had followed me through the snow.
I came back to the spot I walked my dog through the woods the next day and found big ole paw prints nestled right in my snowshoe tracks for a length of our walk, crystalized enough when I found them that the bear was probably going through within an hour or two after I had (before the nighttime cold).

You're being stalked by a bear? Shocked Probably rather less scary than if by some of the 'humans' who stalk people.

Henry
sean

Any piglet tracks?




Jam Lady

Whereas if Slim were in Montana

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/10/03/man-survives-2-bear-attacks-same-morning/91461590/
Woo

Whereas if Slim were in Montana

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/10/03/man-survives-2-bear-attacks-same-morning/91461590/

Just a subscription page I'm afraid....
dpack

yogi?

definitely not yogi Shocked
Slim

Whereas if Slim were in Montana

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/10/03/man-survives-2-bear-attacks-same-morning/91461590/

Just a subscription page I'm afraid....

Not for me, but I use adblock and noscript
buzzy

Whereas if Slim were in Montana

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2016/10/03/man-survives-2-bear-attacks-same-morning/91461590/

Just a subscription page I'm afraid....

Not for me, but I use adblock and noscript

And live in the USA!

Henry
dpack

my pooter lives wherever i tell it to live Wink Laughing Woo

I've seen it now. thanks, the reply post with the link worked.

blimey...

BUT if my kids were threatened, I would....
Mistress Rose

Glad we don't have anything that nasty here. I am rather nervous about wild boar getting into the area, although I must say it will give me great pleasure to put up a sign warning dog walkers to keep their dogs on a lead in case they get attacked by a wild boar. At present we sometimes either meet the dog and don't see the owner at all, or hear the owner frantically calling the dog, who is somewhere else, not even in the same wood. dpack

i had forgotten about the hairy piggies, if they are hurt, startled or defending piglets they can be very fierce, mostly they just scamper off into the bushes or hide when they smell or hear folk.

i had some snuffling about around me in total darkness in the forest of dean a long time ago , they came they sniffed they went away . i suspect it is rather different with bears.
Slim

they came they sniffed they went away . i suspect it is rather different with bears.


Surprisingly not that much different (with black bears sans offspring).

The best way to picture coming across a black bear in the woods is to think of a scavenging raccoon crossed with a big fat lumbering dog. Now triple or quadruple the size. I still wouldn't want to get between one and its cubs, but they're pussycats compared to grizzlies (brown bears).
Jam Lady

Pussycats, you say?

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/06/060613-cat-bear.html?source=rss
dpack

Laughing Slim

Pussycats, you say?

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/06/060613-cat-bear.html?source=rss

A perfect example Very Happy
dpack

thinking of them as part raccoon and part big dog and scared of cats does put them in a different category to the white bear that ate my pal's mars bars and then tried to eat him unaware he was an ex para and armed. when i was defleshing the skull for him i was amazed at the size of it's teeth and the strength of bone and muscle the thing had to make them chomp.

im glad your local black ones are not overly keen on eating folk , i get the impression brown ones can be a bit iffy even if they are not hungry or protecting cubs. white ones are always hungry or at least looking to stock up the fridge for later.
Mistress Rose

Wild boar also apparently eat bluebells, so a ploughed up bluebell patch is a sign of them.

Small animals can be very protective and territoral. In laws used to have a small poodle that would make sure it brought back the number of people it took out with it, and if when it was with people it would see off any other dog including a huge alsation or similar. Never found out what it would do if confronted with a bear as the situation very rarely arises in the south of England, thank goodness.
dpack

there could be a few "exotics" pottering around the uk . my ex fil was a game warden for 8000 acres of woodland ,heath and farmland in surrey. in the early 1980's he was convinced there was a puma/cougar sized feline killing deer ,paw prints, cat style kills (bite to windpipe on red deer ,bite to spine on little ones ,liver eaten first etc etc ). he tried dead bait , long hours in high seats by water etc etc and did not get it in a few years , it stopped leaving kills and traces about 1984. ps he wasn't given to fantasy and had hunted just about every thing .

many of the "exotic"stories are mistakes and hoaxes but im fairly sure some are not, thing is with felines they are rather good at avoiding people. quite a few were turned loose when the wild animal regulations about "pets " came into force but up until then one could buy a puma in a pet shop.
Slim

When the discoverer knows enough to distinguish from a bobcat or a lynx, I tend to give credence to claims of mountain lion. It's still a bit of a contentious subject here, but many people swear they've seen the long tails of mountain lions. I myself am pretty sure I heard a warning growl/call while walking just over the border in Canada as a younger lad, but have no visual evidence, other than reports of scat previously in the same area.

They're damn elusive, don't like to be seen by humans much! There is photographic evidence of mountain lions as far south as Massachusetts, so I assume them to be here as well, though maybe transiently. The discussion gets further muddied as the 'catamount' subspecies that used to patrol the New England area has been officially deemed extinct, but people are still reporting sightings of mountain lions. The genetic evidence reveals that we have individuals from the American West and from South America that live here now. As to whether or not they're breeding, it's unknown but seems likely.

The Western mtn. lions likely just ranged far enough to make it here, the south american stock are expected to have been pets that were released by rich idiots after they grew to be too large and dangerous to keep on illegally in their Manhattan apartments
Mistress Rose

In the UK the only cats of that sort are wild cats, and I understand they really are wild, but they live in Scotland and only there in very remote areas on the whole.

We are fairly sure we have a big cat of some sort in out area. It has been seen in various places on the Downs, and we have seen it, although not close and have some paw print evidence too.

A swamp cat was killed on the road not too far from here a few years ago, and a friend has a picture of an enormous, but domestic cat standards, animal he saw in his garden. All of these must have escaped or been released from captivity, as none are native.
dpack

the scottish wild cat is very rare ,about twice the size of a largish domestic , it can cross breed with domestics which usually results in wild cat markings and a fairly big size (i'm fairly sure i had one for 15 yrs , mum went camping, got pregnant and all the kittens had the wild cat striped tail and grew up huge )
much of the wild population has domestic and wild cat genetics

the beast dick was after was far bigger ,he reckoned about the size of a puma ,4 ft between front and back paws when drinking and probably around 50kg.
one of the neighbours had a pair of pet lions (properly caged etc so it wasnít them ) and the mystery beast left prints about half the size of napoleon and josephine (he had a deal to give them manky deer carcases if he was culling sick ones ). beasty left smaller paw prints than them that were similar but not quite the same.

it was big enough to drop adult red deer but usually went for fallow (and probably bunnies but it did not leave bits of them as they are snack size)

this was before dna testing so if he did ever see hair or dung he didnít get samples.

thinking of mistaken identity my ronnie ( [wolf x gsd] x [ wolf x newfie] ) was huge for a "dog", hairy and mistaken for a bear by a couple who met him in the woods, they sent a picture of his paw print with a yale key to show scale to the local paper Laughing Laughing Laughing (he did have big paws but he would have been a very small bear )
i didn't bother correcting the story so there are probably folk still think there are bears in the woods of urban west yorkshire which i find quite amusing Laughing

in south yorks a family pet dog (gsd x ) had a partial hair cut ,leaving a "mane" to help treat its mange , that one was mistaken for a lion when it said hello to a delivery driver Laughing
Slim

the scottish wild cat is very rare ,about twice the size of a largish domestic , it can cross breed with domestics which usually results in wild cat markings and a fairly big size (i'm fairly sure i had one for 15 yrs , mum went camping, got pregnant and all the kittens had the wild cat striped tail and grew up huge )
much of the wild population has domestic and wild cat genetics

the beast dick was after was far bigger ,he reckoned about the size of a puma ,4 ft between front and back paws when drinking and probably around 50kg.
one of the neighbours had a pair of pet lions (properly caged etc so it wasnít them ) and the mystery beast left prints about half the size of napoleon and josephine (he had a deal to give them manky deer carcases if he was culling sick ones ). beasty left smaller paw prints than them that were similar but not quite the same.

it was big enough to drop adult red deer but usually went for fallow (and probably bunnies but it did not leave bits of them as they are snack size)

this was before dna testing so if he did ever see hair or dung he didnít get samples.

thinking of mistaken identity my ronnie ( [wolf x gsd] x [ wolf x newfie] ) was huge for a "dog", hairy and mistaken for a bear by a couple who met him in the woods, they sent a picture of his paw print with a yale key to show scale to the local paper Laughing Laughing Laughing (he did have big paws but he would have been a very small bear )
i didn't bother correcting the story so there are probably folk still think there are bears in the woods of urban west yorkshire which i find quite amusing Laughing

in south yorks a family pet dog (gsd x ) had a partial hair cut ,leaving a "mane" to help treat its mange , that one was mistaken for a lion when it said hello to a delivery driver Laughing

Sounds lynx-ish...

I'm starting to wish I could get a cat with some scottish wildcat genetics.... Laughing Probably the closest I could get around here is a Maine Coon cat.

Interesting that someone confused wolfish prints for bear.... I always think bear hind prints looks like a big barefoot print. Looks a bit like "bigfoot went running with his dog"
dpack

i thought the maine coon was part domestic part bengal cat as a starting point.

they are about the same size as the wildcats and wc crosses

any of those would keep the bears off the patio Laughing
Jam Lady

Maine coon is a large, long haired domestic cat.

"The Maine Coon is the largest breed of domestic cat. On average, males weigh from 13 to 18 lb (5.9 to 8.2 kg) with females weighing from 8 to 12 lb (3.6 to 5.4 kg). The height of adults can vary between 10 and 16 in (25 and 41 cm) and they can reach a length of up to 48 in (120 cm), including the tail, which can reach a length of 14 in (36 cm) and is long, tapering, and heavily furred, almost resembling a raccoon's tail. The body is solid and muscular, which is necessary for supporting their own weight, and the chest is broad. Maine Coons possess a rectangular body shape and are slow to physically mature; their full potential size is normally not reached until they are three to five years old, while other cats take about one year."

Bengal is a cross from Asian leopard cat and domestic cats. The first three generations out from the cross are usually kept as foundation stock for breeding, or for specialty owners. The fourth generation is sold as pets. Popular for their rosette markings, agility, long muscular body, fondness for water.
Mistress Rose

Son has a cat with some Maine Coon in its breeding he thinks. It is very furry, apart from its lower legs, so looks as if it is wearing boots, has the mottling in some lights on its sides, and has a very mobile tail. It wags it when pleased rather like a dog. It is all black with green eyes. Rather pretty. Not at all vocal and does like water. buzzy

Maine coon is a large, long haired domestic cat.

"The Maine Coon is the largest breed of domestic cat. On average, males weigh from 13 to 18 lb (5.9 to 8.2 kg) with females weighing from 8 to 12 lb (3.6 to 5.4 kg). The height of adults can vary between 10 and 16 in (25 and 41 cm) and they can reach a length of up to 48 in (120 cm), including the tail, which can reach a length of 14 in (36 cm) and is long, tapering, and heavily furred, almost resembling a raccoon's tail. The body is solid and muscular, which is necessary for supporting their own weight, and the chest is broad. Maine Coons possess a rectangular body shape and are slow to physically mature; their full potential size is normally not reached until they are three to five years old, while other cats take about one year."

Bengal is a cross from Asian leopard cat and domestic cats. The first three generations out from the cross are usually kept as foundation stock for breeding, or for specialty owners. The fourth generation is sold as pets. Popular for their rosette markings, agility, long muscular body, fondness for water.

Oh good grief! Shocked Teetotal cats! Shocked Shocked Where will it all end?

Henry
Slim

Son has a cat with some Maine Coon in its breeding he thinks. It is very furry, apart from its lower legs, so looks as if it is wearing boots, has the mottling in some lights on its sides, and has a very mobile tail. It wags it when pleased rather like a dog. It is all black with green eyes. Rather pretty. Not at all vocal and does like water.

I think of all black as suggesting Norwegian forest cat. Where's Erikht when you need him?

My 12 lb orange tabby was acting a little strange the night before last. Really upset with us for bringing him in. Then as we left yesterday morning we noticed he kept hanging out by a car. Turns out he had caught a rabbit and was annoyed that we kept him from being able to eat it that night. Last night he "brought up" the remains of the hindquarter that he had eaten while we were away for the day. puke_l Rolling Eyes puke_r
dpack

puss in boots sounds amusing Laughing Mistress Rose

She is rather pretty rather than amusing, and I am sure, as most cats would, that you would get a distainful feline 'look' for even suggesting she is amusing in appearence. Very Happy dpack

Laughing

the last one i laughed at was dangling cartoon style from the wire roof of a fox trap ,disdainful is an understatement of it's mood Rolling Eyes
Mistress Rose

Very Happy
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