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kGarden

Which kitchen food mixer?

I'm thinking of buying a food mixer. My Mum had a Kenwood one, she probably bought it just after the war and we stupidly threw it out when she downsized 4 or 5 years ago ... it had never given her a day's downtime ...

We have quite a few applicanced from Andrew James, and they have a mixer for £90 (or £100 including Meat Grinder and Blender attachment)


https://andrewjamesworldwide.com/UserControls/productIndividual.aspx?ProductID=579

but I don't know if I need something more ... ermmm ... expensive (as I have no idea whether a higher price brings me something more? Lasting 50 years, like my Mums, would be worth paying extra for!!)

The Independent has an article on "10 best Kitchen mixers" and starts with the "Kenwood Chef Major Titanium KMM020" at £715. Gulp!

Kitchenaid Stand Mixers seem to crop up often and the reviews are full of "Perfect" comments Smile



4.8L bowl (AndrewJames 5.2L), pretty much the same beaters with both makes ... Kitchenaid starts at £380, or a bit more depending on colour.

So ... just buy the Andrew James? or is there some benefit of buying Kitchenaid? or perhaps something else entirely?
dpack

sorry ,i could help re hand mixers/stick blenders etc (i have killed a few and have new ones that are doing ok) but the big ones all i can suggest is make sure replacement parts are easy to get and that second hand industrial can be better than new domestic .
kGarden

second hand industrial can be better than new domestic .


That's a good shout, thanks. Further reading suggests that decision might be best made on:

How loud the motor is
Whether the motor is, say, Belt driven or Induction as the later is likely to be longer lived.

I'm inclined to buy-cheap and see how much it actually gets used, and buy quality second time around (if there is a 2nd time around Smile )
vegplot

Look for second hand Hobart mixers.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/hobart-mixer-/181607293369?pt=UK_BOI_Restaurant_RL&hash=item2a48a361b9
kGarden

Hobart mixers


Thanks, not heard of them before and look suitable robust.

Googling tells me that Hobart make a 140 Litre floor-standing model with stainless steel bowl - I reckon that will mix plaster!, which will bring a whole new dimension to marriage compared to cleaning my mower's Briggs & Stratton in the kitchen sink Laughing
vegplot

Hobart mixers

Thanks, not heard of them before and look suitable robust.

Googling tells me that Hobart make a 140 Litre floor-standing model with stainless steel bowl - I reckon that will mix plaster!, which will bring a whole new dimension to marriage compared to cleaning my mower's Briggs & Stratton in the kitchen sink Laughing

In the '80's I worked for Redland's (now La Farge) in the research labs We used table top Hobarts to mix small batches of cement. Never went wrong despite being driven hard by lab technicians.
sean

Hobart kit is really good. It's not multi-function though so if you want the mincer and liquidiser functions you'll need stand-alone ones of those too. kGarden

It's not multi-function though so if you want the mincer and liquidiser functions you'll need stand-alone ones of those too.

We're not particularly short of space, and as such I would prefer tools that are good at jobs, rather than multi-function.

I bought a soup maker, which I love. It is also able to be a liquidiser, at which it is decidedly average, and it came with an egg boiler - no I have no idea why either, nor have I ever used it ... but I have felt obliged to keep it "just in case" so its wasting cupboard space. A dedicated mincer might not take up much more storage space than a strap-on one, perhaps?

Although now you mention it Mother's pre-historic Kenwood had a mincer. Looking at glossy £MegaBucks mixer models today there was one with a strap-on mincer, and then another strap-on which allowed the front of the mixer to driver a pasta maker. Surely one of those hand-wind Pasta makers would do just as well?, other than for industrial quantities.
Pilsbury

Hobart kit is really good. It's not multi-function though so if you want the mincer and liquidiser functions you'll need stand-alone ones of those too.
not actually true, if you look in the pic that the eBay link is for at the top front of the mixer is a little sticky out bit with a black knob.
that holds a plate on that can be moved and different attachments can be added, granted not a liquidizer ascthst needs a faster rate than the machine uses but on the big floor standing one I used to use I could grate a 5kg block of cheesewithout cutting in.
Mincers are also available and veg prep attachments.
One thing is be careful you down nt get carried away on size, even small catering kit can struggle to mix a Small enough for home use.
Pilsbury

http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/181600950421?nav=SEARCH
mincer attatchment
Pilsbury

http://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/181600948454
veg prep
earthyvirgo

I asked Mum for her old Kenwood when she upgraded.
Much prefer it to the more modern one I used to have.
I reckon it's about 40 yrs old and still works a dream.

EV
Nick

I think I'd buy a twenty year old kenwood. They'll do another century and parts are available. oldish chris

I think I'd buy a twenty year old kenwood. They'll do another century and parts are available. Mine's 39 years old, not used a lot, but still works OK. kGarden

I think I'd buy a twenty year old kenwood. They'll do another century and parts are available.

I clearly should have hung on to Mother's Sad Although it was blinking heavy, and would have been a chore to get out each time - Mother's was permanently stationed on the worktop, but back in those days she baked almost daily ...


"Restored" but £350 ...
https://www.kenwoodchefrestore.co.uk/shop/Kenwood-Chef-Used-Attachments/kenwood-chef-a700-mixer-restored

That's an A700 model (I now know) from the 1950's, didn't see any of those on eBay at the moment, although there are plenty of A900's (1976-88 )

which looks a bit of an uninteresting shape to me
oldish chris

......That's an A700 model (I now know) from the 1950's, didn't see any of those on eBay at the moment,.....which looks a bit of an uninteresting shape to me

We modernists think that the second image (A701?) is the best looking of the lot:
Quote:
The Bauhaus firmly establish industrial design. It stripped away the decoration, and left clean lines of function....... To the teachers and followers of the involved in the Bauhaus, function was the primary concern,
Ref kGarden


We modernists think that the second image (A701?) is the best looking of the lot

I'm rubbish at "what looks good" in all sorts of areas - except perhaps the garden. Simple demarcation on choices with Mrs K responsible for interior décor and me for the garden Smile so I'm not surprised that the A701 is considered superior design.

I was brought up with the A700 and that may have been formative.

Having said that it weighed a ton, and the A701 looks lighter, and Forum chatter I read (including a 10 page theead on Money Saving Expert discussing the minutia!) favours the A701 as being bomb-proof.

I've ordered the Andrew James as being cheap & cheerful for now, and I'll take an executive decision on a replacement if it gets used a lot. Not sure about life-expectancy giving a Food Mixer as a Crimbles pressie two years running Very Happy Meantime I have some searches running on eBay and might make an impulse purchase during the year if something suitable comes up.

I can also see myself persuading myself that £200 would be well spent on restoring one to "better than new condition" Smile
http://kenwoodchefrestore.co.uk/Restorations.htm

Mrs K is quite happy with practical gifts (before you ask Smile ). I remember hearing on the radio, some years ago in the run up to Christmas, advice to men from a (female) Pundit - "Nothing for the kitchen, and nothing you saw on late night TV" Very Happy At that point I had already bought a kitchen table in readiness for XMas ... not to worry, Mrs K loved it. Years ago I bought her something that probably WOULD have been seen on Late Night TV ... not going to try that again though!!
oldish chris

I've ordered the Andrew James as being cheap & cheerful for now, and I'll take an executive decision on a replacement if it gets used a lot. That's probably a wise decision. At a guess, it won't be used that much, not like you are going to become a professional baker (are you?). In which case it will probably give years of service. If you do actually wear it out, then something nearer to professional kit would be an investment. Duane Dibbley

I have just sold a A701A on Ebay for a bargain £26 Sad Chez

We've got an A 701 with various attachments that we use for everything but liquidising; and a Vitamix blender. Love them both. The Kenwood cost me about £30, is easy to fieldstrip and the parts are readily available. oldish chris

My Kenwood (A701) has rarely been used for several years. With only the two of us at home, the amount of pastry that I make, I just do it by hand so there's very little washing up.

However, youngest son who is a bit of a cook (signature dish: Beef bourguignon) says he'll get it restored and give it a good home - reckons that that particular model will give him great credibility with other cooks.
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